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Jose Joaquin Garcia, Patricia Herrera and Jesse A. Myers lead a workshop on Theater and Social Justice

photo of workshop instructors

Click HERE to read about this workshop in the Bentley on October 11

 

 

 

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Department of Theater
Dartmouth College
6204 Hopkins Center
Hanover, NH 03755
Phone: 603-646-3104
Fax: 603-646-1757
Email: Department.of.Theater@Dartmouth.EDU
Home >  Productions

Voices: The Dartmouth Theater Visiting Artist Program

 

Voices Logo

African Company Presents Richard III

GUEST DIRECTOR BARON KELLY

Dr. Baron Kelly has the distinction of being a three-time Fulbright Scholar and an internationally recognized critic, historian, practitioner, and scholar. He has just returned this summer from directing Ray Cooney's Out of Order at National Chung Cheng University in Taiwan. Prior to that he had returned from an international tour of Romeo and Juliet and Oedipus to Athens Greece and the island of Spetsis.

International: credits include Tullus Aufidius in Coriolanus (National Theatre of Great Britain); Aaron in Titus Andronicus, Dionysus in The Bacchae, Williamson in Glengarry Glen Ross, Cassius in Julius Caesar, Prince of Morocco in The Merchant of Venice, (Stratford Shakespeare Festival of Canada); King Duncan in Macbeth (The Bargello, Florence, Italy); Krogstad in A Doll's House (National Theatre of Norway); Ira Aldridge in Ira Aldridge (Yermelova Theatre, Moscow, Russia); Lucky in Waiting for Godot (Edinburgh Theatre Festival); DJ in Medal of Honor Rag (Academy Theatre, Dublin, Ireland).

Broadway: credits include Salome with Al Pacino and Electra with the late Colleen Dewhurst. He replaced Tom Woppat as King Arthur in Camelot and played The King in the 50th anniversary production of The King and I. Baron also played Belize in the World Premiere of Angels in America. In addition to beginning his career with New York's Metropolitan Opera, he has performed numerous classical and contemporary roles for over 30 of America's regional theatres including the Oregon, Utah, Dallas Fort Worth, and California Shakespeare Festivals; Yale Repertory; The Guthrie; San Diego's Old Globe; Mark Taper Forum; South Coast Repertory; Shakespeare Theatre Washington; Actors Theatre of Louisville; Williamstown Theatre Festival; McCarter Theatre; Huntington Theatre Company; Philadelphia Theatre Company; Berkshire Theatre Festival; Repertory Theatre of St. Louis; Missouri Repertory; Portland Repertory; Baltimore's Center Stage; Hartford Stage Company; among others. He has also been a participant at Robert Redford's Sundance Playwright's Lab and a member of the Bread Loaf Acting Ensemble.

Film: Thoughts of Suicide; A Day Without a Mexican; Bird; Looking for Jose; Snail Boy; Who Killed the Baby Jesus; Heroes; Voices.

Television: As The World Turns (1 year); Loving (2 years); All My Children (1 year); PBS Cultural Horizons (Emmy winner); Frazier; Law and Order; The Innocent; Majority Rule; Homicide; Joe Bash; The Adventures of The Galaxy Rangers. Dr. Kelly has lectured and taught on the theatre in Norway, Finland, Sweden, Denmark, Ghana, Italy, China, Taiwan, Germany, Hungary, Russia, Poland, Colombia, Puerto Rico, and has been a visiting scholar at Harvard University's W.E.B. Du Bois Institute. He is on the board of the Comparative Drama Conference and has served on the Theatre Advisory Panel for the NEA in Washington. Last year he was given the honor of being elected to membership in The National Theatre Conference.

Training: He holds a diploma from London's Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, an MFA in Acting from California State University Long Beach, and a Ph.D. in Theatre History, Criticism, Literature and Theory from the University Wisconsin-Madison. In 2012, Dr. Kelly will be a visiting scholar at National Taiwan Normal University. He is currently under contract to Focus Publishing for his forthcoming book The Act of Acting.

VOICES OFFERINGS IN 2010-11

Echoes from a Thousand Hills, a solo performance by Hope Azeda & a collaborative performance by the students of THEA 23/ AAAS 54   

Thursday, March 3rd, 4:30-5:30pm
Bentley Theater
Hopkins Center 
"Echoes from a Thousand Hills," a solo performance by Hope Azeda *and* a collaborative performance by the students of THEA 23/AAAS 54 developed with Hope Azeda.
Performed by David Becker '13, Sofia Chernet '13, Ayana Christie '11, Baaba Grant '12, Cassidy Griffin '12, Aryana Jacobs '11, Victor Lekweuwa '13, Olivia Scott '13, Nathan Severance '12, and Celeste Winston '14.  

Hope Azeda is a leading figure in contemporary Rwandan theatre. She is the founder, artistic director and choreographer of Mashirika Creative and Performing Arts, one of the major theatre companies in Rwanda. Under her direction, the group collaboratively created Rwanda My Hope, which was performed in Kigali at the 10th anniversary commemoration of the genocide, and also at the G8 World Summit in Edinburgh in 2005. The play also toured in the UK in 2006 and in Sweden in 2008. Ms. Azeda's work as a writer, performer and teacher has taken her to many theaters and universities around the world, including the Biennial Festival in Stockholm, the Caravan Festival in Copenhagen, the International Festival of the Arts in Sophia and tours of the USA, Canada, Austria, Italy, Germany and South Africa. She has also been an artist-in-residence at the Institute for the Arts and Civic Dialogue in Cambridge, Massachusetts. In addition to her theatre work, she served as a casting director and acting coach for several national and international films, including Sometimes in April, Shake Hands with the Devil, and Shooting Dogs. Ms. Azeda has choreographed for the Rwanda National Ballet and the Rwandan Olympic Committee. She is currently the President of ARTEJ/ASSITEJ Rwanda (International Association of Theaters for Children and Young People) and serves on the Executive Committee of ASITEJ International. Hope was a participating artist in the summer 2008 Dartmouth Summer Arts Festival, Eti! East Africa Speaks!
**************

VOICES COURSE

Winter term 2011 @2A

THEATER 23: Topics in African Theater and Performance

This course introduces the student to the startling diversity of African theater. In addition to reading plays and critical essays from Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa, Uganda, and Côte d'Ivoire, students will have the unique opportunity to work with Rwandan playwright and director Hope Azeda, who will be guiding the students through a series of workshops for three weeks of the course. These three weeks will culminate in a public performance for the Dartmouth community. This course is open to all students with or without a background in theatre. Taught by Laura Edmondson.

Visualizing and Performing Violence: Local and Global ActsHope Azeda 

PANEL DISCUSSION  

4:30 - 6:00 pm
Monday, February 28
Haldeman Center Kreindler Conference Hall (041)

What are the ethics and aesthetics of representing violence through the visual and performing arts?
How do playwrights, choreographers, and painters "speak the unspeakable"? This panel features Hope Azeda, a leading figure in Rwandan theatre, who will discuss Rwanda My Hope, a play that she developed for the ten-year commemoration of the 1994 genocide in Rwanda. Ford Evans, the director of the Dartmouth Dance Ensemble, will discuss his current project called Undue Influence, which explores sexual violence on the Dartmouth campus; Mary Coffey, Associate Professor of Art History, will speak on the violent images that pervade the controversial Orozco murals in the Baker Library. Moderated by Associate Professor Laura Edmondson of the Department of Theater.  

Hope Azeda is a leading figure in contemporary Rwandan theatre. She is the founder, artistic director and choreographer of Mashirika Creative and Performing Arts, one of the major theatre companies in Rwanda. Under her direction, the group collaboratively created Rwanda My Hope, which was performed in Kigali at the 10th anniversary commemoration of the genocide, and also at the G8 World Summit in Edinburgh in 2005. The play also toured in the UK in 2006 and in Sweden in 2008. Ms. Azeda's work as a writer, performer and teacher has taken her to many theaters and universities around the world, including the Biennial Festival in Stockholm, the Caravan Festival in Copenhagen, the International Festival of the Arts in Sophia and tours of the USA, Canada, Austria, Italy, Germany and South Africa. She has also been an artist-in-residence at the Institute for the Arts and Civic Dialogue in Cambridge, Massachusetts. In addition to her theatre work, she served as a casting director and acting coach for several national and international films, including Sometimes in April, Shake Hands with the Devil, and Shooting Dogs. Ms. Azeda has choreographed for the Rwanda National Ballet and the Rwandan Olympic Committee. She is currently the President of ARTEJ/ASSITEJ Rwanda (International Association of Theaters for Children and Young People) and serves on the Executive Committee of ASITEJ International. Hope was a participating artist in the summer 2008 Dartmouth Summer Arts Festival, Eti! East Africa Speaks!

Co-sponsored by the Leslie Center for the Humanities, the Dickey Center for International Understanding, and Voices, the Dartmouth Theater Visiting Artist Program.
*****


VOICES OFFERINGS FOR 09-10

Come see the original performance piece created and performed by students in THEA 10/WGST 66 "Hearing Voices Through Invisible Walls"VOICES Spring Final Presentation

faith * guilt * connection * transformation * fear

Sunday, May 30th @ 7 PM

Rollins Chapel
Free admission

 

"When Crime Runs in the Family:Four Generations of Killers, Thieves, and Con Men"

by Fox Butterfield
Author and Journalist

Sunday, May 16th
4:00 pm
Carpenter Hall Room 13
Reception to follow 

This presentation is free and open to the public.

The Theater Department's VOICES program and the Dartmouth Pow-Wow present:

 "STILL WAITING..."
Poverty, Drug Abuse, and the Vicious Cycles of Modern Reservation Life 

Selections from Samuel Beckett's "Waiting for Godot" followed by a Panel Discussion

Directed by George Neptune '10
Saturday, May 8 @ 4:30 PM
Carpenter 13, FREE ADMISSION

Panelists:

George Neptune
Sean Warnecke
Ian Allison
Chris Holland
Josh Proper
Chelsey Luger
Kiva Sam
Elizabeth Neptune

 

Spring 2010 VOICES Public Presentations:

(in conjunction with THEA 10.4./ WGST 66.3 : "Hearing Voices through Invisible Walls: The Art(s) of Facilitation")

"Is William Martinez Not Our Brother?" Twenty Years of the Prison Creative Arts Project
by Buzz Alexander
Founder, Prison Creative Arts Project

Monday, April 26th
6:30 pm
Carpenter Hall Room 201F
Refreshments Served

"When Crime Runs in the Family:Four Generations of Killers, Thieves, and Con Men"
by Fox Butterfield

Author and Journalist

Sunday, May 16th
4:00 pm
Carpenter Hall Room 13
Reception to follow

These presentations are free and open to the public.

About the VOICES Program:

The Dartmouth Theater Visiting Artist Program brings to campus accomplished minority and other theater artists to collaborate on a theatrical project or projects. At a March 2006 August Wilson tribute, Dartmouth President James Wright was struck by students' passionate desire to see more diverse voices represented in Dartmouth's theatrical productions. "The performing arts are in a unique position to take a leadership role in communicating via a collaborative, public forum," said Peter Hackett, Chair of the department. With an annual funding commitment from the administration, the Theater Department began to develop the program whose mission is to "present work of particular relevance to Dartmouth's minority communities; attracting and increasing the participation of members of Dartmouth's minority communities in the activities of the Theater Department; expanding and enriching the repertoire of Department offerings by regularly including significant theatrical works by artists of color; bringing to Dartmouth distinguished theater artists, including artists of color, to collaborate on these productions; and creating a highly visible artistic initiative that celebrates the diversity at the center of the Dartmouth community."

Spring 2010
THEA 10.4./ WGST 66.3 : “Hearing Voices through Invisible Walls: The Art(s) of Facilitation”
@ 3A
Co-taught by Pati Hernandez and Professor Ivy Schweitzer

Description:

This course examines how four different media––theater, dance, writing, and documentary film making––work to facilitate voice with the goal of turning the invisible walls that separate us into bridges across differences. We will study how these arts facilitate voice through reading, discussion, journaling, reflection papers, and guest speakers, including writers, theater artists, and documentary filmmakers who work with incarcerated people, recovering addicts, and refugees. Students will produce a collective performance about having a voice, and each student will create a short documentary giving voice to a person behind invisible walls in the community. LIT, Dist: CI

Visiting artists include Bill T. Jones, Liz Lehrman, John Borstel, and Fox Butterfield.

VOICES OFFERINGS FOR 08-09

March 2, 2009 @ 8 pm, Moore Theater - Free and open to the public 

BUTA Presents a bench reading of Ruined, a new play by Lynn Nottage.

Directed by Deja Kemp'10 and Lou-Lou Igbokwe'10Lynn Nottage

There will be a Q & A with the playwright in the Moore immediately following the reading.

Ruined is a haunting, probing work about the resilience of the human spirit during times of war. Set in a small mining town in Democratic Republic of Congo, this powerful play follows Mama Nadi, a shrewd businesswoman in a land torn apart by civil war. But is she protecting or profiting by the women she shelters? How far will she go to survive?     
Hailed by Chicago and New York critics as "dazzling," "gripping," and "the play that in every way deserves to become the 2009 Pulitzer Prize winner for drama," Ruined premiered at the Goodman Theatre in Chicago and is now playing off-Broadway at the Manhattan Theatre Club.

This reading is co-sponsored by the Theater Department's VOICES program.

March 3. 2009. 2 PM & 4 PM in 219 Wilson

Ms. Nottage will attend Professor Laura Edmondson’s “Human Rights and Performance” class @ 2 PM and Professor Soyica Colbert’s “Playwrights of Color” class @ 4 PM to further discuss the play.  These class sessions, both held in 219 Wilson, will be open to other interested students. Please blitz the instructor of the class you wish to attend.

About the Playwright

In addition to Ruined, Nottage is also the author of Intimate Apparel, (New York Drama Critics Circle’s Best Play; Roundabout, Center Stage, South Coast Rep); Fabulation, Or The Education Of Undine (Obie Award; Playwrights Horizons, London’s Tricycle Theatre); Crumbs From The Table Of Joy; Las Meninas; Mud, River, Stone and Por’knockers and Poof! .

Nottage received the MacArthur Foundation “Genius Grant” Award, the PEN/Laura Pels Award, the 2005 Guggenheim Grant for playwriting, and fellowships from the Lucille Lortel Foundation, MTC, New Dramatists and the NYFA is an alumna of New Dramatists, and a graduate of Brown University and the Yale School of Drama where she is a visiting lecturer. 

Ms. Nottage’s residency is co-sponsored by The Leslie Center for the Humanities, The Dickey Center, The Rockefeller Center, the Office of Institutional Diversity and Equity, the Kingsdale Fund in Drama, the English Department, the African and African American Studies Program, and the Office of Pluralism and Leadership. 

 

THEATER 10 - VOICES: Playwrights of Color

3B Winter Term, Professor Soyica Colbert

This course will explore the perspectives of contemporary playwrights of color by focusing on their texts' social and political contexts. We will also examine how the playwrights comment on the formation of identity and subjectivity, paying particular attention to the categories of race, gender, sexuality, and class. We will consider how the playwrights utilize these demarcations to construct and explode identity, realizing how race, gender, sexuality, and class have always been fluid, enigmatic, constructed, and historically informed categories. Moreover, we will consider how the specular quality of theater comments on these categories. We will read plays by Chin, Hwang, Moraga, Parks, and Wilson.  

 

THEATER 10 - VOICES: PerformActivism

2A Fall Term, Professor Patricia Herrera

This course examines how performance has functioned as a forum to raise consciousness and rehearse notions of community in the 20th century. Our archive will include various theoretical texts and performances that spark civic dialogue. Students will have the opportunity to work with guest artists, experience hands on interventionist techniques, and collectively develop a performance piece. This course is open to all students with or without a background in theater. 

Universes Theater GroupAs part of “Voices: The Dartmouth Theater Visiting Artist Program,” the nationally acclaimed Poetic Ensemble Theater Company Universes and the renowned hip-hop dancer and choreographer Pop Master Fabel will be in residency at Dartmouth in the fall along with in-house poet, playwright, and performer Woon-Ping Chin.  These artists will conduct public presentations, master classes, and workshops for the course “Voices: Peformactivism” (THEA 10/LATS 11/AAAS 86). Under the guidance of Professor Herrera and direction of community activist Pati Hernandez participants will develop a culminating performance engaging the Dartmouth campus community and community at large around a current social issue.  This production will be held in the Bentley Theater on Wednesday, December 3, 2008 at 8pm.

Co-sponsors for the following residencies include: VOICES program, Latin American, Latino, and Caribbean Studies Program, African and African American Studies Program, the East Wheelock Cluster, The Leslie Center for the Humanities, The Rockefeller Center, and The Office of Institutional Diversity and Equity.

To learn more about the VOICES Visiting Artists Universes and Pop Master Fabel, please visit the Baker-Berry Library Exhibition "Latinos and Latinas at Dartmouth: Community, Culture, and Scholarship" starting Friday, October 10.

Company-in Residence: Universes

Master Class: "The Voice of the Ensemble"

Tuesday, October 21 & Thursday, October 23, 2008

An exploration into the workings of ensemble, how pieces are formed individually and fused together. 

Public Presentation: "Talking the Talk”

Wednesday, October 22, 2008

A look at the sights and sounds that make us, us, and you

Universes is a National/International ensemble Company of multi-disciplined writers and performers who fuse Poetry, Theater, Jazz, Hip-Hop, Politics, Down Home Blues and Spanish Boleros to create moving, challenging and entertaining theatrical works. The group breaks the bounds of traditional theater to create their own brand, inviting old and new generations of theater crafters as well as the theatergoers and new comers to reshape the face of American Theater.

The company recently (January & February 2008) returned from a four continent tour, which carried them through Africa’s Morocco and Tunisia, Europe’s England, Amsterdam, Romania and Turkey and even over to the Asian Continent via Istanbul.  This tour was collaboration between Jazz at Lincoln Center and the US State Department to carry American music abroad on a Rhythm Road Tour.  In addition, a Universes anthology of work and process entitled, UNIVERSES: THE BIG BANG (Plays, Poetry & Process) is scheduled for release in January of 2009 by TCG Books.   Universes, is also completing their newest work, Ameriville, directed by acclaimed director, Chay Yew. 

Steven Sapp and Mildred Ruiz, founding members of Universes, will be conducting workshops to the Dartmouth community. .  She is the recipient of fellowships from the Theater Communication Group, National Endowment of the Arts, and Ford Foundation. 

***********************************************************************

Visiting Artist: Pop Master Fabel

Master Class: Foundational Dance Forms Associated with Hip Hop Culture

Tuesday, October 28 & Thursday, October 30, 2008Fabel dancing

Public Presentation: “We Are One”

Wednesday, October 29, 2008

Intertwining history, identity, struggle, commitment and perseverances, this presentation looks at the unity and parallels within the various forms of Hip Hop expression.

Legendary Jorge “Fabel” Pabon was born and raised in Spanish Harlem, NYC where, at an early age, he developed his dance and choreography career at Hip Hop jams and clubs throughout the city.  His pioneering individuality has been showcased internationally since 1982. President of the Hierophysics crew, Senior Vice President of the Rock Steady Crew, member of Magnificent Force, and an honorary member of the Electric Boogaloos, Fabel is also co-founder of GhettOriginal Productions, Inc. With GhettOriginal, Fabel co-authored, co-directed, and co-choreographed the first two Hip Hop musicals ever, "So! What Happens Now?" and "Jam on the Groove" (first official Off-Broadway Hip Hop musical).

He has also toured internationally as a featured performer with "Jam on the Groove," which was nominated for best choreography at the Drama Desk Awards in 1996. Fabel was also featured in the cult classic Hip Hop movie "Beat Street." Along with fellow members of the Rhythm Technicians and Rock Steady Crew, he won the 1991 Bessie Award for choreography. Highlights of his career include performing in Lincoln Center's "Serious Fun!"; P.B.S.'s "Great Performances 20th Anniversary Special"; the Boston Ballet; the 1994 American-Japan Festival (sponsored by the Smithsonian Institution); both the 1983 and 1991 Kennedy Center Honors Gala events, and a Hip Hop version of Kurt Weill's "September Songs" for P.B.S. Fabel was the first American Hip Hop dancer to perform in Cuba, in 1986 & 1988, with the dance company, Ballet D'Angelo.

He is currently working on three documentaries: "Apache Line", "Fabel's History of Hip Hop Fashion Vol. 1" and "Puerto Ricans in Hip Hop." Fabel is a historian of and activist within Hip Hop culture. His other forms of expression include "graffiti" art, DJ'ing and rhyming. Fabel is a co-founder of Tools Of War, a grass roots Hip Hop company covering publicity, events coordination and promotions, activism, bookings, and consultation.

 

 

 

Voices Inaugural Program

On October 4th,  Suzan-Lori Parks, Pulitzer prize winning playwright of Topdog/UnderdogSuzan-Lori Parks, came to speak in the Bentley Theater of the Hopkins Center for the Arts. Come and see our production of

Topdog/Underdog

October 25, 26, & 27

Directed by VOICES visiting artist Niegel Smith '02
Bentley Theater
October 25 & 26 at 8:00 pm
October 27 at 5:00 pm
This event is free and open to the public. For tickets, contact the Department of Theater, 646-3104.

and 365 Days/ 365 Plays by Suzan-Lori Parks

Directed by VOICES visiting artist Niegel Smith '02
October 25 & 26 at 7:00 pm
October 27 at 4:00 pm
Locations around the Hopkins Center

The 365 National Festival

Hundreds of theaters have joined a grassroots premiere of the plays in Atlanta, Austin, Chicago, Colorado, Greater Texas, Los Angeles, Minnesota, New York, Northeast, San Francisco Bay Area, Seattle, Southeast, Universities (365U), Washington DC Area and Western US. And the festival is growing every day. Produced by Bonnie Metzgar and Suzan-Lori Parks.

On November 13, 2002, Pulitzer-prize winner Suzan-Lori Parks got an idea to write a play a day for a year.  She began that very day, finishing one year later.  The resulting play cycle, called 365 Days/365Plays, is a daily meditation on an artistic life.  Some plays are very short, less than a page.  Others last forever.

The 365 National Festival invites every theater in the world to join a grassroots premiere of this play cycle. Over 600 theaters are producing the plays in Atlanta, Austin, Canada, Chicago, Colorado, Greater Texas, Los Angeles, Minnesota, New York, Northeast, San Francisco Bay Area, Seattle, Southeast, Universities (365U), Washington DC Area, Western US and in universities (365U). Produced by Bonnie Metzgar and Suzan-Lori Parks, the 365 Festival will be performed from November 13, 2006 through November 12, 2007.

Plays can be produced in traditional theater spaces or site-specific locations. They can be staged readings or fully produced. Participating theaters will each present seven plays, representing one week of this play cycle, before then passing the cycle on to the next theater in a cultural relay race that celebrates the community of theater artists around the world.

The Dartmouth College Department of Theater joins with the 365 Festival to celebrate the widely diverse cross-section of over 50 theater companies and universities who are participating in the Northeast component of 365.  Make Theater.  Make History.

VOICES visiting artist Niegel Smith '02Niegel Smith

NIEGEL SMITH is a freelance director and is the Artistic Leadership Associate at The Public Theater in New York City. Whether in the median of a busy highway or on the stage of a conventional theater, Niegel uses performance to navigate the boundaries between spectator and participant in communal experiences. With Todd Shalom, Niegel co-conceived and staged PROCESSION and FALLOUT, mass rituals in public settings. His New York directing credits include RAINY DAYS & MONDAYS, MAUD – THE MADNESS, ONE FOR THE ROAD, and LIMBS: A PAGEANT. He is Associate Director to Bill T. Jones on the new Concert/Musical FELA KUTI and has assisted directors Jo Bonney, George C. Wolfe, Kristin Marting and James Lapine. Niegel has received grants and fellowships from Theater Communications Group (through the NEA and Doris Duke foundation), the Van Lier Fund, The Tucker Foundation, and Dartmouth College. He has an A.B. in Theater from Dartmouth. He grew up in the North Carolina piedmont, fishing with his dad, shopping with his mom and inventing tall-tale fantasies with his two younger brothers.

New theater program to emphasize diversity and bring visiting artists

Dartmouth College Office of Public Affairs * Press Release

Posted 05/02/07 * Genevieve Haas * (603) 646-3661

The Dartmouth Department of Theater is developing a new program that will produce an annual theater piece focusing on issues of particular relevance to Dartmouth's minority communities. The annual program, Voices: The Dartmouth Theater Visiting Artist Program, will bring to campus accomplished minority and other theater artists to collaborate on a production. The first event, sponsored and produced by the theater department, is tentatively scheduled for the fall term in 2007.

Peter Hackett, chair of the theater department, said that at a February 2005 August Wilson tribute, both he and Dartmouth President James Wright were struck by students' passionate desire to see more diverse voices represented in Dartmouth's theatrical productions. "The arts are in a unique position to take a leadership role in communicating via a collaborative, public art form," said Hackett. With an annual funding commitment from the administration, Hackett began to develop the program whose mission he describes as "presenting work of particular relevance to Dartmouth's minority communities; attracting and increasing the participation of members of Dartmouth's minority communities in the activities of the Theater Department; expanding and enriching the repertoire of Department offerings to regularly include significant theatrical works by artists of color; bringing to Dartmouth distinguished theater artists, including artists of color, to collaborate on these productions; and creating a highly visible artistic initiative that recognizes the diversity at the center of the Dartmouth community."

"A program like Voices is a way of putting into practice the ideals and spirit of Dartmouth," said Provost Barry Scherr, whose office is funding the program. "It provides a way for faculty and students to join with talented artists from outside the institution in creating something new and meaningful through theater."

Hackett, who is planning to convene the theater department in order to select a multidisciplinary selection committee, explained that Voices is deliberately amorphous. Beyond the basic requirement of inviting a visiting artist to contribute to a theatrical production, Hackett said he left the criteria and structure of the program flexible and open to allow for artists' schedules and to make possible different kinds of theatrical projects and collaborations that would not mesh with the more regimented performance schedule in an academic setting.

The flexibility of Voices not only allows for non-academic production schedules, but permits different kinds of artists, including playwrights, actors and directors, to make a variety of contributions to the program. Ideally, said Hackett, Dartmouth will develop a resource pool of talented artists invested in the program, and possibly find itself able to commission new works for the program.

Last Updated: 7/13/12