Skip to main content

Spanish Courses

Please check with the Registrar's Office for up-to-date information on course meeting times and course availability

Spanish Language Courses

Spanish 1: Spanish I. Introduction to spoken and written Spanish. Intensive study of introductory grammar and vocabulary with a focus on culture. Oral class activities, readings and compositions. Weekly practice in the virtual language lab includes viewing TV series and films and weekly drill sessions. Never serves in partial satisfaction of the Distributive or World Culture Requirements. Sample Syllabus. (PDF)

Spanish 2: Spanish II. Continuation of Spanish 1. Further intensive study of grammar and vocabulary with a focus on culture. Oral class activities, readings and compositions and continued practice in the virtual language laboratory. Weekly drill sessions. Never serves in partial satisfaction of the Distributive or World Culture Requirements. Open to first-year students by qualifying test and to others who have passed Spanish 1. Sample Syllabus. (PDF)

Spanish 3: Spanish III. Continuation of Spanish 2. Spanish 3 provides additional, intensive study of grammar and vocabulary with a focus on literature and culture. Oral class activities, readings and compositions and continued practice in the virtual language laboratory. Weekly drill sessions. Completion of this course on campus or as part of the LSA constitutes fulfillment of the language requirement. Never serves in partial satisfaction of the Distributive or World Culture Requirements. Open to first-year students by qualifying test and to others who have passed Spanish 2. Sample Syllabus. (PDF)

Spanish 5 (Language Study Abroad): Taught in the context of the Language Study Abroad program, this course in Hispanic culture reinforces listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills in Spanish. The thematic focus is on local and regional art history, with special emphasis on the city as a dynamic form of cultural production through time. Attending to political, social, economic, and religious contexts, the course features brief presentations by local personnel as well as relevant field trips. Assignments include conversation, writing projects, oral presentations, and a final course examination. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Dartmouth Language Study Abroad Program. Dist: WCult: W (Spain), NW (Buenos Aires).

Spanish 6 (Language Study Abroad): Taught in the context of the Language Study Abroad program, this introductory course in Hispanic literature strengthens listening, reading, speaking and writing skills in Spanish. The reading materials are selected to help students develop their analytical strategies as well as to expose them to relevant cultural issues and major figures of the region in which they are studying. Assigned work may include brief research papers, oral presentations, a mid-term exam and a final course examination. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Dartmouth Language Study Abroad Program. Dist: LIT; WCult: W (Spain), NW (Buenos Aires).

Spanish 7: First-Year Seminars in Spanish and Spanish-American Literature. Consult special listings. Sample Syllabus. (PDF)

Spanish 9: Culture and Conversation: Advanced Spanish Language. This course serves as a bridge between Spanish 3 and Spanish 20. Through the intensive study of a variety of aural media (e.g., documentaries, TV and radio programs, films), grammar, vocabulary and speech acts as presented in the course packet, students will actively practice listening and speaking skills with the goal of reaching an Intermediate High Level (on the ACTFL scale). Additional written material may be added according to the professor’s particular interests. Prerequisite: Spanish 3; AP Lang 4 or AP Lit 4; local placement test 600+, or permission of the instructor. It serves as a prerequisite for Spanish 20.

Spanish Literature Courses

*Spanish 10: Effective Summer term 2011 Spanish 10 will be re-numbered Spanish 20 and will be a required course for the major, minor, and modified major.  All students who have taken Spanish 10 prior to Summer term 2011 can use this course as a required course for the major/minor or modified major in the Department.

Spanish 15: Intensive Writing Workshop for Spanish Speakers.  This course is designed for bilingual and/or bicultural students with a background in Spanish who wish to enhance their skills in writing and composition.  Course materials will reflect a multi-media approach to understanding the cultural experiences of U.S. Latino/as and the Spanish-speaking world.  The course will focus on structures related to languages and cultures in contact, review key grammatical concepts, and move to advanced stylistics.

As with Spanish 9 this course serves as prerequisite to Spanish 20.

Spanish 20: Writing and Reading: A Critical and Cultural Approach. Spanish 20 is the first course of the Major/Minor, and serves as transition between the skills acquired through the Spanish language courses (Spanish LSA or equivalent preparation) and those needed for all upper-division courses (30 and above). Through the study of critical and theoretical vocabulary, and the reading of short stories, poems, films, theatrical plays and journalistic articles, students will acquire analytic tools to comprehend and analyze several types of texts. This course is also designed to familiarize students with different textual genres and a wide array of literary and interpretative key concepts.

Prerequisite: Participation in one of the Spanish LSA programs; Spanish 9 or 15; exemption from Spanish 9 based on test scores (see Department web site); or permission of instructor. Spanish 20 may be taken in conjunction with 30-level survey courses. It serves as a prerequisite for all Spanish courses 40 and higher. Dist: LIT.

Spanish 21: Traditional and Contemporary Andean Cosmogonies and Cultural Production: A Historical Approach (L.S.A.+).  This course will connect course content with cultural activities, such as excursions, visits to museums, and lecture.  The thematic focus of the course will be Andean Art and Culture from pre-Hispanic times to the preent, elements of Andean cosmogony, civilizational clash, and cultural miscegenation included.

Spanish 22: Modern and Contemporary Spanish Artistic and Cultural Production. (L.S.A.+).  This course will make students fluent in some of the main topics relevant to modern and contemporary Spanish cultural production, with a particular emphasis on Northern Spain.  The course will not count towards the major or minor. Dist: ART; WCult: W.

Spanish 23: Argentine Cultural Heritage. (FSP) This course deepens the student’s knowledge of the Argentine art and cultures through the study and discussion of the visual, architectural and plastic arts, as well as music and performance. The materials will expose the students to the main trends and topics of contemporary Argentine art, cultures and society. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program, Argentina. Dist: ART; WCult: NW.

Spanish 24: Spanish Cultural Heritage. (FSP) This course deepens the student’s knowledge of the Spanish art and cultures through the study and discussion of the visual, architectural and plastic arts, as well as music and performance. The materials will expose the students to the main trends and topics of contemporary Spanish art, cultures and society. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program, Spain. Dist: ART; WCult: W.

Spanish 30: Introduction to Hispanic Studies I: Middle Ages to 17th Century. This course presents an overview of major literary trends and cultural productions from the Middle Ages to the 17th century in both their Spanish and Spanish American contexts. Students will read a representative selection of major literary works from that period, both Peninsular and Spanish-American, and discuss theoretical, aesthetic, and critical issues pertinent to the Renaissance, the Baroque, colonialism, syncretism, etc. Texts may also be cultural, visual, and/or filmic. Prerequisite: Spanish 20. Dist: LIT; WCult: W.

Spanish 31: Introduction to Hispanic Studies II: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries. This course presents a chronological study of major trans-Atlantic literary trends and cultural productions, corresponding to the cultural and aesthetic movements of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Students will read a representative selection of major literary works, both Peninsular and Spanish-American, from that period and discuss theoretical, aesthetic, and critical issues pertinent to modernity, empire, enlightenment, nationalism, gender, democracy, etc. Texts may also be, cultural, visual, and/or filmic. Prerequisite: Spanish 20. Dist: LIT; WCult: W.

Spanish 32: Introduction to Hispanic Studies III: 20th - 21st Centuries. This course presents a chronological study of trans-Atlantic major literary trends and cultural productions, corresponding to the cultural and aesthetic movements from the 1880s to the present. Students will read a representative selection of major literary works from that period, both Peninsular and Spanish-American, and discuss theoretical, aesthetic, and critical issues pertinent to modernismo, the avant-garde, revolution, post-modernism, etc. Texts may also be cultural, visual, and/or filmic. Prerequisite: Spanish 20. Dist: LIT; WCult: W.

Spanish 33: Argentine Civilization: Society, Culture, and Politics in Argentina. (FSP) This course studies socio-political events in the Southern Cone that have shaped the contemporary configuration of society in Argentina. Emphasis will be placed on key political figures, social movements, oppositional tensions, dictatorship and democracy, and their articulation in the cultural field. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program. Dist: SOC; WCult: NW.

Spanish 34: Society, Culture and Politics in Spain. (FSP) This courses studies socio-political events in the Iberian Peninsula that have shaped the contemporary configuration of society in Spain. Emphasis will be placed on key political figures, social movements, oppositional tensions, dictatorship and democracy, and their articulation in the cultural field. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program, Spain. Dist: SOC; WCult: W.

Spanish 35: Studies in Spanish-American Literature and Culture. (FSP) This course is designed to offer students an opportunity to study a topic of interest in Spanish American literature and culture through the reading of a wide variety of literary and cultural texts. Emphasis will be placed on Argentina and the Southern Cone. Topics may vary. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program, Argentina. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW.

Spanish 36: Studies in Modern and Contemporary Spanish Literature. (FSP) This course is designed to offer students an opportunity to study a topic of interest in the literature's and cultures of Spain through the reading of a wide variety of literary and cultural texts. Topics may vary. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program, Spain. Dist: LIT; WCult: W.

Spanish 40: Hispanic Literature and Culture by Period. This course will focus on the study of the significant historical periods and cultural movements of the Hispanic world. It is organized according to chronological eras that are marked by distinct cultural and literary movements. Areas covered will be the Middle Ages, the culture of the Renaissance and the Baroque, the Colonial Period, Enlightenment and Modernity, Nineteenth-Century Romanticism and Realism, the Avant-Gardes, Post-modernism, and new developments in the contemporary period. One or more periods will be selected for study. Spanish courses numbered 40 and above may be repeated for credit when offered as different topics. Prerequisite: Spanish 20. Dist: LIT; WCult: Varies.

2014-15:

In 14F, War in 19th Century Latin American Culture

This course will provide a critical and theoretical approach to textual and visual representations of war during the 19th century in Latin America, specifically focused on Argentina, Chile, Paraguay and Uruguay. We will analyze war as a special condition in the production of cultural artifacts -such as essays, novels, illustrated newspapers, memoirs, paintings, wood engravings and photography- during the formation of Nation-States. We will look at three study cases: the wars of Independence at the beginning of the century, the River Plate Civil Wars, and the War against Paraguay. Díaz-Duhalde.

2013-14:

In 13F, The Novels of Destruction. Social and State Violence in 19th Century Latin American Narrative Fictions

This course will explore the topics of social and state violence through 19th century novels from the Southern Cone. The course will have two overarching objectives. First, we will study the novel as genre in the context of political and aesthetical movements that pertain to the State-building process. Second, we will rethink the role of narrative fictions as they bear witness to the social upheavals and military destruction produced by that very process of nation construction (revolutions, wars, riots, mutinies). Authors we will explore in this course: José Victorino Lastarria (Chile), Juan María Gutiérrez (Argentina), Alejandro Magariños Cervantes (Uruguay), Alberto Blest Gana (Chile), Eduardo Acebedo Díaz (Uruguay), Juan Crisóstomo Centurión (Paraguay), and Eugenio Cambaceres (Argentina). Diaz-Duhalde.

Spanish 43: Hispanic Literature and Culture by Genre. A literary genre is defined as an established category of written work employing a set of recognizable common conventions, such as technique, style, structure or subject matter. This course will focus on the study of Hispanic literature's and cultures and is organized around one or more basic genres like poetry, drama, novel, and essay. Other articulating categories for the course may include epic poetry, tragic drama, short-fiction narrative, the picaresque novel, and melodrama, among others. The course will provide students with the appropriate critical vocabulary to understand the specificity of the genre or sub-genre examined in the course. Spanish courses numbered 40 and above may be repeated for credit when offered as different topics. Prerequisite: Spanish 20. Dist: LIT; WCult: Varies.

2014-15:

In 14F, Ballads in Medieval Hispanic Literature

This course will focus on the tradition of ballads or Romancero in Spanish literature from the Middle Ages to the present. Although compounded in distant times, the romances reflect a worldview that has its continuity in the present era. The set of poetic compositions called Romancero has been forged through a complex process that involves the translation of genres from oral tradition to culture writing. These genres of oral tradition are known as simple forms, such as case, fable, joke or the historical anecdote, among others. The course will deepen into the meaning and range of these simple forms. We will study a variety of old and new, Sephardic or contemporary, vulgar or burlesque romances from both sides of the Atlantic. Lozano.

2013-14:

In 13F, Let's Make a Scene!: from Love to War in Stages in Modern Spain

Theater in 18th century Spain enjoyed a new age of splendor that continued into the 19th century with an increasing number of theatergoers. This panoramic course will explore how theater shocked people into questioning controversial issues in a highly tumultuous period in Spain: Women issues; fashion "diseases;" romantic love; insatiable passions; domestic violence; illiterates, freaks and prostitutes; war and revolution. Other issues to be examined include "dangerous" spaces such as gardens, balconies and windows; the physical space of theater as a place of social and emotional encounter; and the impact in stages of political breakthroughs –after all the word "liberal" was coined for the first time in early 19th century and has shaped Spanishness ever since up to these days. Muñoz.

Spanish 45: Regional/National/Trans-Atlantic Approaches to Hispanic Studies.  This course studies the complex intersections between literatures, languages, cultures and their national, regional, and trans-Atlantic contexts in Spain, Latin America, and the US. In this course, literary and cultural expressions are studied in relation to place in a wide array of historical contexts. Issues may include literature and colonialism, "indigenismo," the city/country dialectic, regional and national languages and cultural interdependence, the arts as buffers of political/nationalistic violence, national borders and cultural identity, and the formation of national literatures. Spanish courses numbered 40 and above may be repeated for credit when offered as different topics. Prerequisite: Spanish 20. Dist: LIT; WCult: Varies.

2014-15:

In 15S, Slaves from the Past, Slaves Next Door

This course will deal with human bondage. It will try to address a fundamental question: Under what circumstances and through what strategies does a human being strip another human being of his/her humanity? From Columbus to Almodóvar we will use modern theories of human domination/bondage —such as Hegel and Nietzsche's theorization of the master-slave dynamics —as we explore slavery and human bondage trough history in literature and films. Materials for the course will include readings from Columbus, Cuneo, Chanca, Hegel, Nietzsche, Manzano, Carpentier, Rulfo and García Márquez, as well as films by Pontecorvo, Almodóvar, Bollaín, Taberna and Sauper. Pastor.

2013-14:

In 14S, Utopian Cartographies of Enlightenment and Emancipation/Cartografías utópicas de la Emancipación.

This course will trace the fascinating map of utopian journeys, visions and proposals that shaped Latin America's independence from Spain between the 18th century and 1900. We will read a variety of literary works and documents as we explore the many dialogues that, across the Atlantic and between North and South America, revolutionized Spanish American societies and helped shape new ideals of freedom, justice, culture and art. Readings will include Lizardi, Miranda, Bolívar, Alberdi, Sarmiento, Marti and many others. Pastor.

Spanish 50: Gender and Sexuality in Hispanic Studies. This course will explore how the study of gender and sexuality is integral to understanding the complexities of Hispanic societies and cultures. In addition to analyzing literary texts and cultural and artistic productions, students will also examine theoretical and critical approaches to the study of gender and sexuality. Topics may include feminist movements, the construction and performance of gender, the theory and practice of women’s writing, sexual identities, and queer theories as they relate to Hispanic embodiments and representations in literature and culture. Spanish courses numbered 40 and above may be repeated for credit when offered as different topics. Prerequisite: Spanish 20. Dist: LIT; WCult: CI. Varies.

2014-15:

In 15S, New Sexual and Social identity in Film and Literature in Post-Franco Spain

This course addresses changes in Spanish society since the end of the dictatorship. These include the relativization of family, love, drugs, sexuality, life, death, and democracy; and the devaluation of morals, history, and culture. Authors include Vázquez Montalbán, Marías, Loriga, Montero, Riera, Almodóvar, de la Iglesia, Amenábar, and Balagueró. Aguado.

Spanish 53: Topics in Spanish Linguistics, Rhetoric, and Poetics. The focus of study for this course will be the evolution of the Spanish language from its old and early modern manifestations to contemporary uses. Specific geographical contexts will be given special attention. Topics may include the constitution of Castilian as a national language and its relation to other peninsular languages; the history of linguistic change on all levels (phonetic/phonological, morphological, syntactic, and semantic); the influence of Arabic, indigenous languages of the Americas, English, and dialectal variants. Fundamental notions of rhetoric and poetics will be central to this course as well. Spanish courses numbered 40 and above may be repeated for credit when offered as different topics. Prerequisite: Spanish 20. Dist: LIT; WCult: Varies.

2014-15:

In 14F, History of the Spanish Language

This course features a series of lectures on the history and geography of the Spanish language. In history, it provides an account of how the Spanish language derived from Latin, with particular regard for phonological and morpho-syntax development. In geography, students will learn how to observe and record the reality of Spanish currently used in Spain and Latin America. The objective of this course is to understand the derivation of different linguistic phenomena and the geographic variations of Spanish by exploring its history and geography. Lozano.

2013-14:

In 13F, Spanish Linguistics, Rhetoric, Poetics, and the Politics of Language

The first part of this course surveys the evolution of Castilian language, with special emphasis on the influence of Arabic and indigenous languages of the Americas, Judeo-Spanish (ladino), Italianisms and Cultisms, Voseo, and the influence of English. In the second part, students will acquire analytical skills to understand the rhetorical and poetic architecture of major works of the Golden Age (Garcilaso de la Vega, Luis de Góngora, Fray Luis de León, etc). Finally, the course reflects on the politics of language by focusing on the history of Language Academies, the production of Grammars, Dictionaries and Orthographies, the relation between Castilian and other languages in Spain and Latin America, and the place of Castilian/Spanish in the United States. Cirnigliaro.

Spanish 55: Hispanic Literature, Culture, and Politics. This is an interdisciplinary course that studies through diverse representations in literature and the arts major sociopolitical realities that have shaken and transformed the Hispanic world such as the Conquest, colonialism, the rise of the modern nation states, the Mexican and Cuban revolutions, the Spanish Civil War, Latin America’s “dirty” wars, etc. The course will explore the interconnection between culture and politics allowing the student to read culture as a political text and political events as texts. Spanish courses numbered 40 and above may be repeated for credit when offered as different topics. Prerequisite: Spanish 20. Dist: LIT; WCult: Varies.

2014-15:

In 15W, Humor and Politics in Latin American Literature, Film and Culture

Comedy and humor often serve to undermine cultural elitism and denounce social injustice. Many Latin American authors, filmmakers, and artists have used comedy and humor in politically subversive ways, but also as a way to legitimize the cultures and communities of the marginal and disenfranchised. This course will explore several theories of humor as well as Latin American traditions of humor. Reyes.

Spanish 60: Race and Ethnicity in Hispanic Studies. A common misperception about race and ethnicity is that they are uniformly defined and that one region’s understanding of these terms is identical to any other. How are race and ethnicity conceptualized and represented in Spain, Latin America, and U.S. Latino communities? This course will examine the particular historical, regional, and cultural factors that give rise to different notions of race and ethnicity in the Hispanic world. Individual offerings of this course may focus on one or more of the following: Moorish Spain and the Reconquista; the Jewish Diaspora in Spain and Latin America; indigenous societies in Latin America; racial and cultural “mestizaje”; whiteness, racial purity, and “blanqueamiento”; slavery, the African Diaspora, and “afro-latinidades.” Spanish courses numbered 40 and above may be repeated for credit when offered as different topics. Prerequisite: Spanish 20. Dist: LIT; WCult: CI.

2014-15:

In 15W,

2013-14:

In 14S, Bullets and Letters: Basque Terrorism and the Arts

This course will focus on Basque culture produced in response to ETA terrorism and its resolution. We will study the ideology that governs nationalist discourses, understand the relation between identity and violence, and find in the arts (literature, film, painting, and sculpture) a reason to make the humanities one of the legs upon which peace and reconciliation rest.  Literature by Atxaga, Etxenike, Otxoa, Juaristi, Zaizarbitoria; films by Medem, Calparsoro, Arteta, Gutiérrez Aragón, Rosales, Taberna; and art by Ugarte, Ameztoy, Oteiza, and Chillida. Martín.

Spanish 63: Hispanic Film Studies. Film and the visual arts in Spain, Latin America, and/or the US will be studied under different approaches in order to: understand the historical evolution of film making within these contexts; examine the different film genres (surrealism, neorealism, melodrama, film noir, Hollywood realism, animation, documentary, etc.) in their Hispanic contexts; study the body of work of renowned Latino, Spanish, and Latin American filmmakers and visual artists; analyze important cultural or historical events through their visual representations (the Mexican Revolution, the Spanish Civil War, the Cuban Revolution, end of Francoism, etc.); etc. Students will become familiar with relevant concepts in film analysis, film theory, and cultural studies and learn how issues of representation in the visual arts are linked to their literary counterparts. Spanish courses numbered 40 and above may be repeated for credit when offered as different topics. Prerequisite: Spanish 20. Dist: ART; WCult: Varies.

2013-14:

In 14W, Latin American Film

In this survey of Latin American film we will study the Mexican Golden Age of film (1936-1969), Cuba's revolutionary film (Lucia) as well as other radical films of the 60s (Sangre del condor), and women's films. We will end looking at the most important production coming out of Latin America today such as the films of Francisco Lombardi, Claudia Llosa, Lucrecia Martel and others. We will also study important film manifestos. Spitta.

Spanish 65: Hispanic Performance, Media, and the Arts. In our increasingly globalized society, what impact have transnationalism and new technologies had on the formation and articulation of local cultures in the Hispanic world? How do subjects remember and represent themselves as embodied actors in the spaces where conflicting and contestatory identities meet? How have television, the visual and graphic arts, and music redefined national space and identity in Spanish, Latin American, and U.S. Latino communities? Individual offerings of this course may focus on one or more of the following: theater, performance, and performativity; comics and the graphic arts; literature and the marketplace; the politics of mass media; sports and national identity; and popular culture’s strategies of resistance. Spanish courses numbered 40 and above may be repeated for credit when offered as different topics. Prerequisite: Spanish 20. Dist: ART; WCult: Varies.

2014-15:

In 14F, The Freak Onstage

What does it mean to transform the body onstage?  To "mark" the body as different? And, within a Latin American context, what is the significance of theatrical practices using the "strange" body as a medium to explore the underlying myths of a nation? What I am referring to here is the body as monstrous, as the freak, as the representation of absolute Otherness, and this is precisely what is occurring across the stage in many Latin American performative practices. In this course we will read a series of plays, performative texts, and theoretical readings that will allow us to question the meaning of the different body. The analysis of the "freak" onstage will lead to the recognition of the different body as a political issue, a social construction, an individual difference, and a category of inquiry. Santana.

 Spanish 70: Great Works of Hispanic Literature: Don Quixote and One Hundred Years of Solitude. Few novels of the Hispanic world have had greater resonance than Cervantes’ Don Quijote (published between 1605 and 1615) and Gabriel García Márquez’ Cien años de soledad (1969). Both have continually fascinated their readers and provoked myriad interpretations and reinterpretations. This course seeks to understand each text as an autonomous work of literature and as a highly creative response to the literary and cultural forces in which it was forged. Individual offerings of this course will focus on one of these literary masterpieces. Spanish courses numbered 40 and above may be repeated for credit when offered as different topics. Prerequisite: Spanish 20. Dist: LIT; WCult: Varies.

2013-14:

In 14S, Don Quixote

From the time of its publication in 1605 (Part I) and 1615 (Part II), Don Quijote has provoked radically different interpretations. Taking as point of departure both the comic and the romantic interpretation, the course will explore, in the first place, the meaning of the Quijote across the centuries. Parallely the course seeks to understand the Quijote both per se--as an autonomous work of literature--and as a highly creative response to the literary and cultural forces from which it was forged. In addition to explore the historical context, such as social conflicts in the Hapsburg monarchy, in order to make understand better the work, the course will attend also to the literary history, and will offer an approach to novel as literary genre, product of the Medieval "mixtification" which flourished in the Renaissance. Lozano.

Spanish 72: Latin American and Latina Women: Gender, Culture, Literature.

Spanish 73: Special Topics in Hispanic Literary and Cultural Production. This course is offered periodically with varying content so that writers, genres, historical contexts, or theoretical approaches not otherwise provided in the curriculum may be studied. The course can be offered any term and its distinct content, theoretical, or methodological approach will depend on the area of specialization of the instructor. Spanish courses numbered 40 and above may be repeated for credit when offered as different topics. Prerequisite: Spanish 20. Dist: LIT; WCult: Varies.

2014-15:

In 14X, Under the Influence. Intoxicating Goods and Vicious Texts from Early Modern Spain

The encounter with America in 1492 radically transformed the Spanish marketplace. Previously unknown culinary delicacies, beverages and other novel intoxicating items from the New World (such us tobacco and chocolate) took Spaniards' forms of consumption and consumerism to a new level. These novelties introduced in the Spanish diets and habits reinforced attitudes of orientalism towards America and, by the same token, shaped the Spanish identity and taste in new ways. We will concentrate on practices of intoxication that include, but are not limited to, sniffing tobacco, drinking excessive amounts of chocolate, and eating indigestive clay for cosmetic purposes. We will study literary and historical texts that describe, decry and sometimes celebrate early modern new fashions and bad habits. Cirnigliaro.

In 15S, Spanish Leviathan: Literature and State Violence from 1812 to 2009

Spain's modern history could be read as an almost incessant succession of wars, authoritarian dictatorships and repressive gestures. The state's monopoly of violence, its rhetoric of sacrifice and regeneration, and its self-arrogated historico-political superiority have been at the core of many of these tense processes. In this course, students will be exposed to a series of Iberian literary texts that deal with this issue and, in a concise and pedagogic fashion, to the most relevant theories and critiques of the modern state (i.e. Hobbes, Kant, Hegel, Marx, Mill, Schmitt, Benjamin, Derrida, Agamben). Gómez.

Spanish 75: Creative Writing in Spanish. This course offers a workshop in creative writing to be taught by prominent writers in residence in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese. It is designed for native speakers of Spanish, heritage speakers, and Spanish majors in their junior or senior years. Seminar-sized class meets twice or three times a week plus individual conferences when necessary. The class will consist of group workshops on student writing (fiction, poetry, and/or theater) and individual conferences with the instructor. The limit for this class is 14. Spanish courses numbered 40 and above may be repeated for credit when offered as different topics. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Dist: ART; WCult: Varies.

Spanish 77: Texts and Contexts: Topics in Writing (formerly Spanish 37). This course is designed to help students develop excellence in writing as they prepare for upper level literature and culture courses in Spanish. Topics will vary according to term and faculty as well as the "texts" studied in the course (literary, filmic, cultural, and visual). Given that thinking, reading, and writing are interdependent activities, Spanish 77 is designed to offer students an opportunity to study a topic of interest in Hispanic literature or culture while simultaneously emphasizing the advanced writing skills required of a research paper. Frequent exercises in writing and close textual study are basic to this course. Spanish courses numbered 40 and above may be repeated for credit when offered as different topics. Prerequisite: Spanish 20 or permission of instructor. (PDF). Dist: LIT; WCult: W.

2014-15:

In 15W, Manuel Puig: The Evolution of a Narrative Poetics. From La traición de Rita Hayworth (Betrayed by Rita Hayworth), to Cae la noche tropical (Tropical Night Falling)

This course will delve into the great Argentine novelist of the Latin American post-Boom. It will pay special attention to the development of those narrative technics —such as fragmentarism, documental narration, objectivism, camera zoom, blocked dialogue, the character's other Ego, and totalitarism, among others— that granted Puig the fame of being one of most innovative novelist of the twentieth century Spanish American novel. In the process of eliciting Puig's Poetics and style, we will explore the composition of other of his most memorable novels, as well as the political and ideological polemics enacted by those works. The study includes comparative analyses with the movies based on Puig's novels, and a revision of the most relevant criticism on Puig (Bacarisse, Jill-Levine, Giordano, Corbatta, Tittler, etc.). Bueno.

Spanish 78: Living in the Borderlands: Latino/a Culture and Identity.

Spanish 79: Latino/a Literature: Between Literary Traditions, Languages, and Cultures.

Spanish 80: Senior Seminar in Hispanic Studies. The senior seminar in Hispanic Studies is designed to provide Spanish majors with a small group setting that facilitates in-depth discussion of key concepts of critical theory, literary studies, and the discipline. The seminar will encourage students to research and explore relevant topics related to Hispanic literature and the arts and experiment with the application of the different concepts under discussion in creative ways (essay writing, visual arts projects, performance pieces, etc). Spanish courses numbered 40 and above may be repeated for credit when offered as different topics. Prerequisite: Senior standing. Dist: LIT; WCult: Varies.

2014-15:

In 15W, A World on Sale: Spanish TV Advertisement and the Logic of Commodification (1956-2013)

This course will trace the history of Spanish public and private television broadcasting from a particular perspective: the evolution of TV commercials. Students will be exposed to many different examples of commercials that epitomize, capture and manipulate cultural and political problems and anxieties of these commercials' historical circumstances. Simultaneously, we will try to understand how television publicity has evolved, both in narrative and audio-visual terms. Finally, this course aims at exploring the intensification of a late-capitalist logic that increasingly commodify more and more dimensions of our affective, private, sexual, professional, religious, and public existence. Students should be prepared to read historiographical and theoretical texts (both in English and Spanish) about the history and practice of (Spanish) television advertising. Gómez.

In 15S, The Ghosts of Globalization

What do ghosts and haunting in 20-21st century Latin American narrative and film have to do with global cultural and economic changes? (Rulfo, Garro, Puig, Cuarón, Gaviria, corridos, Gardel, Valenzuela, Ferré, Cisneros, Allende, Bolaño, etc.). Biron.

2013-14:

In 13F, Piratas, aventureros, curas, guerras y crisis religiosas: Miguel de Unamuno y Pío Baroja

The turn and first decades of the XXth century in Spain was a period of profound social, sexual, political, and philosophical changes. Miguel de Unamuno engaged in his time by focusing on religious values and existential crisis while Pío Baroja responded by freeing his characters from any form of constraint. We will read major works by both writers. Aguado.

In 14W, The Best Hispanic Poetry: Emotion for the Contemporary Reader

Sentiment and subjectivity establish themselves as pillars of modern poetry. In order to overcome its restrictive communicative function and prevail over time, language dwells in a figurative realm by grace of the metaphorical leap. This course will concentrate on the study of some of the finest poems and poets of the Spanish language. Starting with some early examples of the Castilian lyrical tradition (Jorge Manrique, Garcilaso de la Vega, Luis de Góngora or Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz), we will take pleasure in reading and study in depth major figures like Rubén Darío, Juan Ramón Jiménez, Federico García Lorca, and Pablo Neruda. Particular attention will be paid to contemporary manifestations of poetry that inhabit the territory of popular songs. del Pino.

In 14S, NARCO-NARRATIVAS (discurso político, literatura, música, y cine)

From the 1970s to the present day, the international War on Drugs has--directly and indirectly--produced a rich popular culture that might be organized as a new genre: narco-narrative. The stories that celebrate, defend, decry, or attack drug trafficking offer intriguing windows onto the relationship between cultural production (music, prose, and film) on the one hand, and politics/identity-formation on the other hand. In the specific context of Colombia and Mexico, we will explore governmental narratives about drug-trafficking (such El Plan Colombia and El Plan Mérida), popular corridos, rap, films, testimonios, novels and short stories in order to identify the aesthetic, economic, and moral stakes of these different types of story-telling about the drug trade. Biron.

Spanish 83: Independent Study. A program of individual study directed by a member of the Spanish and Portuguese faculty. Spanish 83 will normally consist of a program of reading and research that is not covered in regularly scheduled course offerings. After consultation with the faculty advisor of the project, all Independent Study proposals must be submitted for approval to the Department. Only open to majors in Spanish or Romance Languages. Under normal circumstances, no student may receive credit for this course more than once.

Students interested in pursuing an Independent Study must identify their topic and faculty advisor, and present a proposal to their faculty advisor and to the Department for approval no later than the seventh week of the term preceding the term they wish to undertake the Independent Study. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor and the Department.

Spanish 90: Honors Course. Supervised independent research under the direction of a designated advisor. Honors majors will normally elect this course as the first in the required sequence (90 and 91) for completion of the Honors Program. Spanish 90 is intended to prepare the student for writing the Honors thesis, through readings in primary and secondary texts, theory and methodology. The course will include periodic written assignments and culminate in a final paper. Prerequisite: Admission to the Honors Program.

Spanish 91: Honors Seminar. A prearranged program of study and research during any term of the senior year, on a tutorial basis, with individual faculty members (normally the thesis advisor). A thesis and public presentation are the expected culmination of the course. Prerequisite: Prior admission to the Department's Honors Program; clear evidence of capability to perform honors level work, normally indicated by completion of Spanish 90 with a grade of B+ or higher.

Last Updated: 6/11/14