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German Studies
6084 Dartmouth Hall, Room 333
Hanover, New Hampshire
03755-3511
Telephone: (603) 646-2408
Fax: (603) 646-1474
 
Chair: Ellis Shookman
Ellis.Shookman@dartmouth.edu
 
Administrator: Wadeane Kunz
Wadeane.Kunz@dartmouth.edu
 

Spring 2015

Gallerie des 20. Jahrhunderts


Language Study Abroad (LSA): this term's offering has been canceled.

German 1. Introductory German. Taught at 9S by Petra McGillen. Introduction to written and spoken German. Intensive study of basic grammar and vocabulary through readings, oral and written drills, composition exercises, conversation, and practice in the virtual laboratory. The textbook is the 6th edition of Deutsch: Na klar!, by Di Donato et al.

German 2. Introductory German. Taught at 10 by Bruce Duncan. It will also use the x-hour on Thursday at 12. Continued intensive study of basic grammar and vocabulary through readings, oral and written drills, composition exercises, conversation, and practice in the virtual laboratory. The textbook is the 6th edition of Deutsch: Na klar!, by Di Donato et al.

German 3. Intermediate German. Taught at 10 by Eric Miller. A continued intensive study of basic grammar and vocabulary through readings, oral and written drills, composition exercises, conversation, and practice in the virtual laboratory. This course completes the 6th edition of Deutsch: Na klar!, by Di Donato et al. The final weeks of the term will introduce students to a close examination of a real German text - literary or filmic, depending on instructor's choice. The completion of German 3 constitutes completion of College's language requirement.

 

Medien

German 10.03. – Intermediate German Language and Culture: Understanding German Media. Taught at 11 by Petra McGillen. This intermediate course explores the media scene of contemporary Germany, with a focus on newspapers, TV, radio, and blogs. We will compare these media, study the kinds of language they produce, and analyze their place in contemporary German culture. Students will develop writing skills by practicing the stylistic conventions of each medium, learning to communicate effectively with different audiences. The course reviews grammar topics in detail, expands vocabulary, and strengthens listening, speaking, and writing skills. Conducted in German.

 

Wolf, Goethe, Freud, Nietzsche, Riefenstahl, Marx

German 13. "Beyond Good and Evil." Taught at 12 by Ellis Shookman and other members of the department. Borrowing its title from Nietzsche, this course examines some of the most famous and infamous figures - mythological, fictional and historical - that have profoundly shaped German identity. While exploring the lives, works, and influence of the likes of Luther, Faust, and Leni Riefenstahl, students will not only develop a greater understanding of Wagner's question "What is German?" but also learn how the answer to that question has come to epitomize notions of good and evil in general. Taught in English.

Christopher KloebleGerman 82. Adaptation: Different Medium, Different Story. Taught in German by Christopher Kloeble, the Max Kade Visiting Professor, at a time to be arranged: Why are films so seldom as good as the books on which they are based? This seminar raises and attempts to answer such questions by comparing German novels with the movies made of them. It thus examines the kind of alterations and adjustments made to render such literary texts suitable for the cinema. The novels examined may include Fontane's Effi Briest, Schnitzler's Traumnovelle, Grass's Blechtrommel, Süskind's Parfum, Kehlmann's Vermessung der Welt and the instructor's own Unter Einzegängern and Wenn es klopft.

German 85. Independent study project. Before the beginning of the term, and after consulting with a faculty member, students submit a proposal to the department.

German 87. Honors Thesis. By the middle of the previous term, and after consulting with a faculty member, students submit a proposal to the department.

Last Updated: 11/25/14