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Geography Department
6017 Fairchild
Hanover, NH 03755
Phone: (603) 646-3378
Fax: (603) 646-1601
Email: geography@dartmouth.edu
 

 Student Spotlight

thomas

Cooper Thomas '14

Geography major Cooper Thomas '14 will spend the 2014–2015 academic year in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, as a Fulbright Fellow. There, he will conduct independent research on post-socialist urbanization and cultural transformation. Inspired by his coursework in urban geography and GIS, as well as a personal interest in Central Asia's social and political history, Cooper will explore the ways in which Bishkek's urban design, land use patterns, architecture, and iconography reflect the reconstitution of Kyrgyz national identity. As an avid cartographer, Cooper will also use advanced spatial analysis techniques to quantify and visualize trends in urban development. His research will culminate in a multimedia report comprised of text analysis, photography and video, and graphical data visualizations.

Faculty News

Jaclyn Hatala Matthes published a new paper (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2014JG002642/abstract) in the Journal of Geophysical Research – Biogeosciences. This research, conducted in collaboration with the Biometeorology Lab at the University of California, Berkeley, investigated the spatial drivers of methane emissions from a restored wetland in California. Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas that is emitted from flooded soils, and this research helped to better understand how temperature, wind, and the spatial configuration of plants on the landscape all contribute to the production and emission of methane from wetlands. This paper also developed novel methods for analyzing the spatial patterns of methane flux from ecosystems by fusing remote sensing data from the WorldView-2 satellite with eddy flux tower and micrometeorological measurements.

Footprint technopolitics, a new article by Susanne Freidberg, appears in the August 2014 issue of Geoforum.  The journal Historical Research has also published Freidberg's Moral economies and the cold chain, an article based on a plenary lecture delivered last year in London at the 82nd Anglo-American Conference of Historians on the theme of "Food in history."

Richard Wright has a new paper in the journal Political Geography.  Working with Mark Ellis, Matt Townley and Kristi Copeland (U Washington), he is interested in the effects of state level legislation on internal migration in the US.  The effects of Jim Crow laws on the exodus of blacks form the US South are well known and well documented.  Wright and colleagues ask: are the immigrant hostile environments in certain US states producing outflows of targeted populations. They focus on The 2008 Legal Arizona Workers Act (LAWA). LAWA requires all public and private employers to authenticate the legal status of their workers using the federal employment verification system known as E-Verify. With LAWA, Arizona became the first state to have a universal mandate for employment verification. While LAWA targets unauthorized workers, most of whom are Latino immigrants, other groups could experience LAWA's effects, such as those who share households with undocumented workers. In addition, employers may seek to minimize their risk of LAWA penalties by not hiring those who appear to them as more likely to be unauthorized, such as naturalized Latino immigrants and US-born Latinos. They find a significant and sustained increase in the internal outmigration rate from Arizona of foreign-born, noncitizen Latinos -- the group most likely to include the unauthorized — after the passage of LAWA. There was no significant LAWA internal migration response by foreign-born Latino citizens. US-born Latinos showed some signs of a LAWA-induced internal migration response after the law went into effect, but it is not sustained. The results indicate that local and state immigration policy can alter the settlement geography of the foreign born and require us to think about immigrant settlement may adjust in the coming years to the intersecting geographies of post-recession economic opportunity and tiered immigration policies.

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Course Information
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Faculty Spotlight

Jaclyn Hatala Matthes, Assistant Professor

matthewtowerJaclyn Hatala Matthes is a new Assistant Professor in the Department of Geography and an Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Department of Biology. Professor Matthes works at the intersection of ecosystem ecology and atmospheric science to investigate physical and biological feedbacks between global climate change, land-use change, and ecosystem processes. She is particularly interested in understanding how ecosystems control greenhouse gas fluxes between the biosphere and atmosphere, and the role that ecosystem management plays in the global carbon cycle. Her research also explores the impacts of disturbance processes, such as insect and pathogen outbreaks, floods, land-use changes, and fires, on the carbon cycle of ecosystems. In Winter 2015, Professor Matthes will teach a new course, GEOG 8: Life in the Anthropocene, which will investigate the physical and ecological consequences of our current era of unprecedented human impacts on the Earth and its ecosystems. Because her research is interdisciplinary, Professor Matthes looks forward to collaborating with a broad range of students with diverse interests.


 

 

Last Updated: 8/11/14