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Honors

GENERAL HONORS

The regulations of the following three paragraphs apply to the awarding on grad­uation of the degree of Bachelor of Arts summa cum laude, magna cum laude, or cum laude:

A student with final average exactly matching or exceeding the final cumulative average of the lowest standing of the past three academic year’s top 5% of gradu­ates will be awarded the degree summa cum laude.

A student with lower standing but with final average exactly matching or exceeding the final cumulative average of the lowest standing of the past three aca­demic year’s top 15% of graduates will be awarded the degree magna cum laude.

A student with lower standing but with final average exactly matching or exceeding the final cumulative average of the lowest standing of the past three aca­demic year’s top 35% of graduates will be awarded the degree cum laude.

The lowest averages for these three groups of graduates in the three academic years 2001-2002 through 2003-2004 were, in descending order, 3.84, 3.72, and 3.55. Accordingly, these values govern the awarding of the corresponding honors in 2004-2005.

A Senior Fellow may be eligible for these honors by application of the regula-tions already given, provided that the Committee on Senior Fellowships certifies that the level of his or her work during the fellowship year justifies the awarding of the honor.

The two students who attain the first and second highest standings for the college course shall be given respectively valedictory and salutatory honors (which shall not necessarily consist of appointments as commencement speakers). No student shall be eligible for salutatory or valedictory honors who has not been for at least three years a student at Dartmouth College.

HONORS IN THE MAJOR

Students with sufficiently high grade point averages overall and in their major may be admitted to the corresponding Honors Program. For details of admission and requirements see pages 88-89. To be certified for graduation, they like other students must complete in at least passing fashion all of the courses of their major along with any other requirements normally specified by the department or pro-gram.

Those graduating honors candidates who achieve at least a B+ average in the work of the Honors Program (but not necessarily an overall minimum B+ average in the major) will have officially completed the Honors Program and will so earn Honors in their major. If the department or program deems that the student has performed outstanding independent work, it may assign High Honors in the major by an individual vote.

Honors or High Honors in the major will be entered on a student’s permanent record, e.g., Honors in History or High Honors in Chemistry. No entry will be made concerning Honors or completion of an Honors Program for a student who does not achieve the indicated B+ average in the work of the Honors Program.

A number of departments and programs have described fully their Honors Pro-grams in the description of their majors; others refer to this statement and to the general requirements for the Honors Program (pages 88-89).

HONOR LIST

At the close of the spring term an Honor List is calculated for all the classes, based upon the work of the year starting the previous summer, and divided into three groups; to be included, students must have been enrolled for at least two of the terms, have received at least five regularly recorded grades (i.e., other than CT, NC, or NR), and have no standing of Incomplete in any course for the year. The regulations of the following three paragraphs apply:

An eligible student with annual average exactly matching or exceeding the annual average of the lowest standing of the previous year’s top 5% of eligible stu-dents will be placed in the first honor group (i.e., will be designated as a Rufus Choate Scholar) for the year.

An eligible student with lower standing but with annual average exactly matching or exceeding the annual average of the lowest standing of the previous year’s top 15% of eligible students will be placed in the second honor group for the year.

An eligible student with lower standing but with annual average exactly matching or exceeding the annual average of the lowest standing of the previous year’s top 35% of eligible students will be placed in the third honor group for the year.

Approximately January 1 in the current academic year the annual averages for the past academic year of all the eligible students of that year (as defined in the first paragraph) will be examined and the lowest annual averages for the students in the top 5%, top 15%, and top 35% will be determined. These values accordingly govern the placement in honor groups for 2004-2005. Preliminary examination suggests that the required averages will closely approximate, in descending order, 3.92, 3.79, and 3.59.

PHI BETA KAPPA SOCIETY

The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an honorary society, originally founded at the College of William and Mary in 1776, in which membership is conferred for high scholastic standing only. The Alpha of New Hampshire was established at Dart-mouth in 1787, being the fourth oldest chapter in the country. Membership is determined by vote of the chapter according to scholarship record, no initiative being taken by the student. The president of the chapter is Alan Gaylord, and the secretary-treasurer is Kate Soule.

The following persons are eligible for regular membership:

a) Any undergraduate who on October 15 of the fall term three years after matriculation has completed at least eight R (Residence) or O (Off-Campus) terms at Dartmouth College, and who then ranks in cumulative average among the twenty highest in that category. To be considered on October 15, such a student should have completed (with final grades) all courses for previous terms; if such is impossible, the student may present the reasons to the Chapter Secretary for due consideration.

b) Any student who at the time of graduation from Dartmouth College has a cumulative average no lower than the average achieved by graduates within the top tenth of those graduating in the preceding three academic years. If the application of this figure results in the selection of less than ten percent of the graduating class, additional students will be invited to join Phi Beta Kappa to bring the total mem-bership to ten percent of the graduating class.

Note: The cumulative average required of candidates during the academic year 2004-2005 is 3.78, which was the dividing line for the top tenth of those graduated in the academic years 2001-2002 to 2003-2004.

THE SOCIETY OF SIGMA XI

Sigma Xi is a scientific honor society, originally established at Cornell Univer-sity in 1886. Its mission is to honor scientific accomplishments, to encourage and enhance the worldwide appreciation and support of original investigation in sci-ence and technology, and to foster a creative and dynamic interaction among sci-ence, technology, and society. A fundamental responsibility of the Society is honoring research scientists or those with aptitude for research. Candidates are nominated by full members of Sigma Xi. Membership is determined by a vote of the Dartmouth College chapter’s Committee on Admissions. The president of the Dartmouth College chapter is Dean E. Wilcox, the vice-president is Jacqueline A. Sinclair, the treasurer is Charles P. Daghlian, and the secretary is Susan Taylor.

The following persons are eligible for associate and full membership:

(a) Associate Membership. Nominees for Associate Member should be seniors or early graduate (e.g., master’s) students who have demonstrated strong aptitude for scientific research. They must have done research that has resulted in an excel-lent written report, which should be available to the Committee on Admissions if requested. They should also have a demonstrated interest in further study and/or research in a pure or applied science.

(b) Full Membership. Nominees for election or promotion to Member should be graduate students in the final stage of a Ph.D. program, or those who have already completed the Ph.D. (including postdoctoral associates and faculty mem-bers). They should have demonstrated noteworthy achievement in research, as evi-denced by a completed Ph.D. dissertation or at least two published papers on their research, at least one of which lists the nominee as the principal author.