Skip to main content

Notice

Information on this website is posted for historical reference only. Please visit the Office of the Registrar for current requirements.

Women’s and Gender Studies Program

COURSES IN WOMEN’S AND GENDER STUDIES

7. First-Year Seminars in Women’s and Gender Studies

Consult special listings

CORE COURSES

10. Sex, Gender, and Society

11F: 10A, 11 12W: 10A 12X: 10 12F: 10, 12 13W: 2A

This course will investigate the roles of women and men in society from an interdisciplinary point of view. We will analyze both the theoretical and practical aspects of gender attribution—how it shapes social roles within diverse cultures, and defines women and men’s personal sense of identity. We will discuss the following questions: What are the actual differences between the sexes in the areas of biology, psychology, and moral development? What is the effect of gender on participation in the work force and politics, on language, and on artistic expression? We will also explore the changing patterns of relationships between the sexes and possibilities for the future.

Open to all students. Dist: SOC; WCult: CI. The staff.

15. Roots of Feminisms: Texts and Contexts

12W: 11 13W: 12

This course will examine pre-twentieth century texts and historical events that set important precedents for the development of contemporary feminist theories and practices. We will survey some of the writings that consolidate legitimated patriarchal/misogynist ideologies in Western worlds (e.g. Plato, Aristotle, the fathers of the Church, the philosophers of the eighteenth-century Enlightenment, Rousseau). We will analyze different ways in which women historically have articulated strategies of contestation and/or resistance to systems of power based on gender differentiation. Readings may include works by French medieval thinker Christine de Pizan; sixteenth-century Spanish cross-dresser Catalina de Erauso; seventeenth-century Mexican intellectual and nun Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz; Mary Wollstonecraft; Maria Stewart, the first African-American political woman writer; the nineteenth-century American suffragists; and anarchist leader Emma Goldman.

Open to all students. Dist: SOC; WCult: CI. 12W: Beasley. 13W: Warren.

16. Contemporary Issues in Feminism: Theory and Practice

12S: 11 13S: 2A

This course explores the theoretical underpinnings of some of the most highly contested issues in society today. We will look at a spectrum of positions on such issues as: questions of difference and equality; women’s health and reproductive rights; identity and identity politics; morality-pornography-violence; eco-feminism-environmentalism; children, family, and human rights; and the representation/performance of femininity/masculinity. Special emphasis will be placed on the connection between theory and practice.

Open to all students. Dist: SOC; WCult: CI. 12S: Bahng; 13S: Bronski.

18. Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies

12F: 10A

This course will examine the ways in which “deviant” sexual and gender behavior and identities, and the political movements that emerge from them, have been conceptualized in U.S. culture. We will cover basic lesbian/gay/bisexual/transgender cultural and political history and the interplay between sexuality, gender, race, class, ethnicity, and economics. Students will be expected to work with primary documents (including novels and film), recent work in queer theory, and historical analysis.

Open to all students. Dist: SOC; WCult: CI. Bronski.

GENERAL COURSES

19. Contemporary Issues in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies

Not offered in the period 11F through 13S.

20. Experimental Curriculum Course

12W: 3A

In Winter 2012 (Section 1) Gender, Activism, and the Common Good. This course will explore individual and group volunteerism and activism in the United States. Employing a community-based learning approach, students will develop their own gendered analysis and personal philosophy of volunteerism, activism, and philanthropy. Students will gain knowledge of American lives and movements through readings, films, perspectives from class speakers, and community-based research and service (interviewing and research, 3-4 hours per week).

Open to all students. DIST: SOC; WCult: CI (Pending faculty approval.) Damon-Moore.

23. Women and Gender in the Americas: Historical Perspectives

12W: 10A 12S: 11

In 12W, (Section 2) American Women’s History from the Civil War to the Present (Identical to and described under History 28). Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. DIST: SOC; WCult: W. (Pending faculty approval.) Orleck.

In 12S, (Section 1), Gender and Power in American History from the Colonial Period to the Civil War (Identical to and described under History 27).

Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Butler.

26. Women/Gender in History: Comparative Perspectives

12F: 12

In 12 F (Section 2) Women and American Radicalism Left and Right (Identical to and described under History 29). Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Dist: SOC; WCult: CI. Orleck.

30. Women, Gender, and the Economy

12S: 2A

In 12S, (Section 1), Women, Gender, and Development (Identical to, and described under, Geography 26).

Open to all students. Dist: SOC; WCult: CI. Fluri.

31. Women, Gender, and Politics

12S: 2A

In 12S at 2A (Section 1), Gender and Politics in Latin America (Identical to Government 49.4, and identical to and described under Latin American and Caribbean Studies 52). Dist: SOC; WCult: NW. Baldez.

32. Women, Gender, and the Law

11F: 10A

In 11F (Section 1), Gender and the Law (Identical to and described under Government 68).

Prerequisite: Government 3 or a law course strongly recommended. Open to all students. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Bohmer.

33. Women, Gender, Family, and Community

12W: 10A, 2 12F: 2A 13S: 2

In 12W at the 10A hour (Section 5), Women, Work, and Family (Identical to and described under Sociology 61). Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Open to all students. Smith.

In 12W and 13S at the 2 hour, (Section 1), Constructing Black Womanhood (Identical to, and described under, Sociology 46; also African and African American Studies 25). Open to juniors and seniors. Dist: SOC; WCult: CI. King.

In 12F, (Section 3) Gender and Judaism. (Identical to and described under Jewish Studies 53). Dist: TMV; CCult: CI. Bronski.

34. Gender, Self, and Identity

12W: 2A, 12 13W: 10A

In 12W at 2A and 13W at 10A (Section 2) Gender Identities and Politics in Africa (Identical to, and described under, African and African American Studies 40 in 12W). Dist: INT; WCult: CI. Coly.

In 12W, (Section 3) at 12 The Masculine Mystique. Why are so many boys and men fascinated by sport and war? Why are young boys more threatened by the term “sissy” than girls are by the term “tomboy”? What are the distinctive qualities of men’s friendships with other men and of their intimate relationships with women? Are our conceptions of masculinity dominated by models of white male development? What is the connection of biological sex with contemporary western notions of masculinity? Readings from anthropology, sociolinguistics, sociology, and race and ethnic studies, and movies will also be utilized in this interdisciplinary and multicultural course.

Open to all students. Dist: SOC. WCult: CI. Travis.

36. Cross Cultural Perspectives on Women, Gender, and Sexuality

11F: 12 12F: 2A

In 11F and 12F (Section 1) Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective (Identical to and described under Anthropology 31). Dist: SOC or INT; WCult: CI. Igoe.

37. Gender and Space

12F: 10

In 12F (Section 2) Gender, Space and Islam (Identical to Geography 41). This course will address various aspects of Feminism, Islam and Space. This course will seek to answer various questions about space, gender and Islam such as: What constitutes a Muslim Space and the “Muslim World”? Who decides and defines these spaces? How are theses spaces gendered and influenced by Islam or Islamic practices? How do such gendering of spaces differ by place? Additionally we will explore the readings of several Islamic feminist scholars that address several gender related topics such as women’s rights, gender roles, honor and Sharia (Islamic law). Open to all students. Dist: SOC. WCult: CI. Fluri.

41. Women, Gender and Global Feminism

12S: 10A, 2A

In 12S, (Section 2) at the 10A hour, Gender and Geopolitics of South Asia. (Identical to Geography 49 in 12S.) In this course we will examine gender and the geopolitical in South Asia. This will include exploring national and transnational conceptions of gender, which are intersected by other social categories, and how gender relations are implicated and impacted by the geopolitical in this region. We will also analyze the ways in which various forms and functions of masculinity and femininity are constructed, controlled, and contested in different situational, social, economic, and political contexts. Open to all students. Dist. SOC; WCult: NW. Fluri.

In 12S at the 2A Hour, (Section 3) Feminism and Islam. Students will be exposed to the writings of women in Muslim communities from Iraq, Iran, and Egypt to Europe and the U.S. We will consider several key questions: How do Muslim women’s voices contest the notion in Asian and African societies that feminism is a Western ideology? What role does Islam play in women’s emancipatory discourses? How have global politics shaped the articulation of Muslim women’s rights? The course will address major debates surrounding the roles of women in war, marriage, and religion. Open to all students. Dist. SOC; WCult: NW. M. Cooke

43. Women, Gender, and Religion

11F: 2

In 11F, (Section 4), Goddesses of India (Identical to and described under Religion 42).

Open to all students. Dist: TMV; WCult: NW. Ohnuma.

46. Gender and Philosophical Thought

12S: 2

In 12S (Section 1), Feminism and Philosophy (Identical to and described under Philosophy 22). Open to all students. Dist: TMV; WCult: CI. Brison

47. Women, Gender, and Literature of the Americas

12S: 11, 2

In 12S (Section 3) at 11, Modern American Women Poets (Identical to and described under English 72.6). Open to all students. Dist: LIT; WCult: W. Zeiger.

In 12S (Section 1) at 2, Immigrant Women Writing in America (Identical to and described under English 62.2). Open to all students. Dist: LIT; WCult: W. Zeiger.

51. Women, Gender, and Literature: Comparative Perspectives

13S: 11

In 13S (Section 5), Modern Jewish-American Woman Writers (Identical to English 67 and Jewish Studies 21). Open to all students. Zeiger.

52. Women, Gender, and Postcolonial Perspectives

11F: 10A 12S:2A 13S:10A

In 11F, (Section 2) Caribbean Women Writers (Identical to African and African-American Studies 80.2 and Latin American, Latino, and Caribbean Studies 65; identical to and and described under English 67.3). Open to all students. Dist: LIT; WCult: CI. Morgan.

In 12S and 13S, (Section 1), Colonial and Post-Colonial Masculinities (Identical to AAAS 67 and described under Comparative Literature 67 in 12S). Dist: LIT. Coly.

53. Gender, Language, and Writing

12W: 11

In 12W, (Section 5) The Poetry and Rhetoric of Love, From Petrarch to Nerve.com (Identical to and described under English 62.1). Open to all students. Dist: LIT; WCult: W. Zeiger.

54. Feminist Literary Criticism

12S: 10A

In 12S, (Section 1) Tears, Love, Happiness: Feminine Territories, Feminist Readings (Identical to Comparative Literature 29). This course is a cross-cultural and interdisciplinary rethinking of classical Hollywood melodrama.  We will examine the “cultural body” of this filmic genre and its “feminization,” the role that Hollywood mass culture plays in different historical contexts (US, Latin America, and Europe), and analyze the political importance of tears for social change.  Topics include socio-political repression, the site of social agency, politics and “feeling,” cultural, national, and gender identities, and historical memory. Dist: Lit; WCult: CI Martín

61. Women, Gender, and Health

12W: 2A 12S: 12

In 12W (Section 2) Plagues and Politics: The Impact of AIDS on U.S. Society. This course will survey the AIDS epidemic in the United States from 1981 to the present. We will examine the history and social impact of the epidemic by exploring its immediate and long lasting effects on issues such as health care, anti-discrimination law, immigration, education strategies, government drug policies, welfare services, as well as LGBT culture. We will also be examining its effects on popular thinking on sex, gender, and sexual culture through mainstream and independent film and media. Open to all students. DIST: SOC; WCult: CI. Bronski.

In 12S (Section 4), Women and Madness (Identical to Anthropology 61) This course will examine the multiple meanings of women’s mental illness. Readings will incorporate perspectives from practitioners, social scientists, historians, journalists, and patients. We will endeavor to unpack how women’s experiences of mental illness emerge within specific gendered social and historical contexts. Through this examination, we will grapple with crucial issues that feminists face in conceptualizing mental health and illness and the political nature of psychiatric knowledge. Open to all students. DIST: SOC; WCult: CI Gulbas.

65. Special Topics in LGBT Studies

13W: 10A

In 13W (Section 3), Queers, Queens and Questionable Women: How Hollywood Film Shaped Post-WWII LGBT Politics. (Identical to Film 47 at the 10A hour in 13W.) This course will examine the interplay between post-war LGBT film representation and the development of a national LGBT political consciousness and movements. It will also explore how this new consciousness shaped popular culture. Open to all students. Dist: ART. WCult: CI. Bronski.

66. Special Topics in Women’s and Gender Studies

11F, 12F: 2A

In 11F and 12F (Section 5) Telling Stories for Social Change. Our society is full of unseen, unspoken, and unheard dynamics that create visible and invisible social walls. Students in this course have the unique opportunity to collaborate with people from behind those social walls from two perspectives: theoretical and practical. Students study the causes of this invisibility and social isolation (mainly pertaining to incarceration and addiction) by participating in an interdisciplinary arts program with local community members from these invisible populations while at the same time attending discussion-based seminars. This combination of practice and theory asks for students to go beyond a critical reflection of our society by contributing to constructive social actions towards change. Dist: Art; WCult: CI (pending faculty approval). Hernandez.

67. Special Topics in Feminist Theory

11F: 2

In 11F (Section 2) Modern Sex: Weimar Republic Germany 1918-1933 (Identical to and described under German Studies 42). Fuechtner.

80. Seminar in Women’s and Gender Studies

11F: Monday, 3-6pm 12F: 3A

The seminar in Women’s and Gender Studies is designed as a culminating experience for Women’s and Gender Studies students and preparation for future work such as independent research, honors thesis, graduate studies and advanced scholarship. 11F: Bronski; 12F: Fluri.

Permission of the instructor is required.

85. Independent Study

All terms: Arrange

This will involve an independent project carried out under the direction of one or more of the Women’s and Gender Studies faculty.

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and approval of the WGST Chair.

90. Foreign Study in Women’s and Gender Studies I

12W: D.F.S.P.

Credit for this course, taught by the FSP Director, a member of the Dartmouth faculty, is awarded to students who have successfully completed a Women’s and Gender Studies course at the University of Hyderabad while a member of the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program in Women’s and Gender Studies. Note: Because this course will vary depending on the director, this course will not automatically be cross-listed with WGST.

In 12W (Section 2) Colonialism, Nationalism, and Gender in India (Identical to Asian and Middle Eastern Studies 29.2). This course will examine the changing character of gender ideologies and gender relations in India under colonial rule. Topics include British views on the position of women in India; the development of social reform movements during the nineteenth century; colonialism and the law; “subaltern” women and economic change; the construction of masculinity; early nationalism and patriarchy; Gandhi’s views on women; women and the Indian nationalist movement; sexuality and the birth control movement; and Hindu-Muslim violence and gender. Dist: SOC; WCult: NW. (pending faculty approval) Haynes

91. Foreign Study in Women’s and Gender Studies II (Identical to Asian and Middle Eastern Studies 27)

12W: D.F.S.P.

Credit for this course is awarded to students who have successfully completed a Women’s and Gender Studies course at the University of Hyderabad while a member of the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program in Women’s and Gender Studies.

In 12W, Gender and the Modern Media in India.

92. Foreign Study in Women’s and Gender Studies III (Identical to Asian and Middle Eastern Studies 28)

12W: D.F.S.P.

Credit for this course is awarded to students who have successfully completed a Women’s and Gender Studies course at the University of Hyderabad while a member of the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program in Women’s and Gender Studies.

In 12W, Contemporary Social Movements in India.

98. 99. Honors Thesis I and II

All terms: Arrange

This two-course sequence involves an extensive investigation of a topic in a student’s area of concentration and submission of an undergraduate thesis. Only students accepted into the Honors Program may take this sequence. Permission of the instructor and the Steering Committee is required.

ASSOCIATED COURSES

Associated courses, listed below, are those with a central focus on gender, women, or women’s experience, and make use of recent scholarship on women and gender. Courses not on the following list may also count as associated courses for certificate students and modified majors. To obtain credit, students must petition the Women’s and Gender Studies Steering Committee outlining how their work in a particular course corresponds to the above definition of an associated course.

African and African American Studies 19: Representations of African American Women in Cinema

African and African American Studies 25: Constructing Black Womanhood

African and African American Studies 36: Toni Morrison

African and African American Studies 40: Gender Identities and Politics in Africa

African and African American Studies 41: Women in Africa

African and African American Studies 67: Colonial and Post-Colonial Masculinities

African and African American Studies 81: Slavery, Gender and Resistance

African and African American Studies 84: Caribbean Women Writers

African and African American Studies 86: Black Feminism(s)/Womanism(s): in Contemporary U.S. Popular Culture

African and African American Studies 86: Black Women Writers

Asian and Middle Eastern Studies 19: Writing Gender in Islamic Space

Asian and Middle Eastern Studies 21: Writing Korean Women, Reading Korean Women

Anthropology 31: Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective

Anthropology 31: Politics of Latin@ Ethnography

Anthropology 33: Crossing Over: Latino Roots and Transitions

Anthropology 34: Comparative Perspectives on the US-Mexican Borderlands

Anthropology 44: Globalization from Above and Below

Arabic 61: Arabic Literature and the Quest for Modernity, with Special Reference to Feminist Discourse

Arabic 63: Society, Culture, and Gender in the Middle East

Art History 16: Age and Status in the Ancient World

Art History 16: Women Artists and Gender Theories

Art History 48: Gender, Race, and Politics in Eighteenth Century Visual Culture

Art History 71: The ‘American Century’: Modern Art in the United States

Art History 80: Sex, Gender, and Identity in the Arts of the Ancient World

Art History 82: Angelica Kauffman: Art and Gender in 18th and early 19th Century Europe

Art History 82: Ideals of Physical Beauty: Gender and Body in Ancient Art

Art History 82: Women and the Art of Japan

Classics 10: Fictions of Sappho

Classics 11: Roots of Feminism

Classics 11: Sex, Celibacy, and the Problem of Purity: Asceticism and the Human Body in Late Antiquity

Classics 11: Slaves, Wives, and Concubines: Did Roman Women Have a History?

College Course 01: Assisted Reproduction in the Twenty-First Century

College Course 04: Virtual Gender: Popular Culture and The Construction of Gender

College Course 05: Inside Out: Prison, Women and Performance

College Course 08: Sexuality and Science

College Course 10: The Performative Body: Culture, Queerness, and the Limits of Genre

College Course 80: Advanced Research on Special Topics in Assisted Reproduction

Comparative Literature 29: Tears, Love, Happiness: Feminine Territories/Feminist Readings

Comparative Literature 37: Gender and Islam

Comparative Literature 39: Mirror, Mirror on the Wall: Gendered Images in the Literary Fairy Tale

Comparative Literature 39: Trauma and Prose Fiction

Comparative Literature 46: Mothers and Daughters

Comparative Literature 47: Medea

Comparative Literature 49: Writing, Eating, and the Construction of Gender

Comparative Literature 52: The Borderlands: Latina/o Writers in the United States

Comparative Literature 55: The Karma of Love: Japanese Women Writers and the Classical Canon

Comparative Literature 67: Fictions of Sappho

Comparative Literature 67: Literature and Women’s and Gender Studies

Comparative Literature 67: Women’s Identities in Migration

Comparative Literature 67: Women and Surrealism

Comparative Literature 67: Colonial and Post-Colonial Masculinities

Comparative Literature 73/101: Feminist Readings

Education 54: Moral Development and Moral Education

Education 57: Social, Emotional, and Moral Development

Education 62: Adolescent Development

English 25: Gender and Power in Shakespeare

English 60: Gender and Sexuality in Asian American Literature

English 62: American Women Poets

English 62: Gender and Cyberculture

English 62: Gender and Memory

English 62: Hebrew Women Poets

English 62: Nags, Bitches, Shrews: Animals and Women in Literature

English 62: Jewish Women Writers

English 62: Immigrant Women’s Writing in America

English 62: Middle Eastern Memoirs/Autobiography and the Construction of Collective Memories

English 62: The Poetry and Rhetoric of Love: From Petrarch to nerve.com

English 62: Women, “Race” and Writing: American Drama and Performance

English 62: Slavery, Gender and Resistance

English 62: War and Gender

English 62: Queer Poetries

English 66: Feminine/Masculine: Visions and Revisions of Early America

English 66: Whitman and Dickinson

English 67: Black Movements

English 67: Black Women Writers

English 67: Caribbean Women Writers

English 67: Contemporary Playwrights of Color

English 67: A History of Asian America in Novels and Prose

English 67: Modern American Jewish Women Writers

English 67: From Cyberspace to MySpace: Studies in Cyberculture

English 67: Native Cultural Production: (Re)Mapping Race, Gender, and Nation

English 67: Toni Morrison

English 67: Woolfenstein

English 67: Contemporary Women Writers

English 67: A History of Asian America in Novels and Prose

English 67: Mixed Race Experience in Asian American Literature and Culture

English 67: Black Women Writers

English 67: Transforming Selves Through Narratives

English 70: Witchcraft and Early Modern England

English 70: Love, Gender, and Marriage in Shakespeare

English 70: Gender, and Power in Shakespeare

English 71: Not Your Father’s Walt Whitman

English 72: Victorian Queer: Constructing Nineteenth Century Sexualities

English 72: Men, Women, and the Love Lyric

English 72: Transnationalism in Asian American Literature and Cultural Criticism

English 72: The Poetry of Elizabeth Bishop

English 72: Virginia Woolf

Environmental Studies 15: Gender and the Environment

Film and Media Studies 46: Television and Histories of Gender

Film and Media Studies 47: Beatniks, Hot Rods, and the Feminine Mystique: Sex and Gender in 1950’s Hollywood Film

Film and Media Studies 47: Representations of African American Women in Cinema

Film and Media Studies 47: Women and the Film Industry

Film and Media Studies 47: Queers, Queens and Questionable Women: How Hollywood Films Shaped Post War LGBT Politics

Film and Media Studies 47: Woman/Nation

Film and Media Studies 47: Unlimited Women: Women and Popular Hindu Cinema

French 45: Masculinity/Femininity

French 60: Gender and French Literature

French 60: Gender and Genre in the Eighteenth Century

French 60: Feminist Theory and the Practice of Writing

French 60: Women in the Eighteenth Century

French 75: Women Filmmakers in the French Tradition

German 42: Freud: Psychoanalysis, Jews and Gender

German 42: Modern Sex: Weimar Republic Germany 1918-1933

Geography 09: Women, Gender, and Science

Geography 19: Gender, Space, and the Environment

Geography 26: Women, Gender, and Development

Geography 41: Gender, Space, and Islam

Geography 43: Geographies of Latin America

Geography 48: Geographies of the Middle East

Government 30: Women and Politics

Government 30: Gender and American Politics

Government 49: Gender Politics in Latin America

Government 60: Global Feminism

Government 68: Gender and the Law

Government 83: Women in Public Office

Government 84: Gender and American Politics

Government 86: Justice, Legitimacy and Power

Hebrew 31: Readings in Modern Hebrew Women’s Literature

History 06: Gender and War in Modern European History

History 06: Asian American Women’s History

History 06: Gender and Sexuality: Asians in America

History 27: Gender and Power in American History, 1607-1920

History 28: American Women’s History Since 1920

History 29: Women in American Radicalism: Left and Right

History 42: Gender and European Society From Antiquity to Reformation

History 48: European Society in the Industrial Age

History 63: History of Recent Science and Technology

History 82: Women in Latin American History

History 96: Marriage and Divorce in the African Context

History 96: Race, Ethnicity, and Immigration in American History

Italian 10: What About Italian Women

Japanese 61: Gender and Nationalism in Japanese Literature and Film

Japanese 63: Karma of Love: Japanese Women Writers and the Classical Canon

Jewish Studies 15: The Jewish Body

Jewish Studies 15: The Middle East Conflict in Film and Literature

Jewish Studies 21: Modern American Jewish Women Writers

Jewish Studies 22: From Fanny to the Nanny: Jewish Women and Humor

Jewish Studies 24: Hebrew Women Poets

Jewish Studies 27: Jewish Women Writers

Jewish Studies 52: Judaism, Sexuality and Queerness

Jewish Studies 53: Gender and Judaism

Jewish Studies 56: Women in Islam and Judaism

Jewish Studies 61: Freud: Psychoanalysis, Jews and Gender

Latin American and Caribbean Studies 52: Gender and Politics in Latin America

Latin American and Caribbean Studies 54: Latina Feminism: Acts of Intervention

Latin American and Caribbean Studies 56: Latin American Women Writers

Latin American and Caribbean Studies 80: Gender and Race in Latin America

Latino Studies 35: Complexities of Latina/o Identities

Latino Studies 41: Representations of/from Latin@s in the Media and the Arts

Latino Studies 44: Crossing Over: Latino Roots and Transitions

Latino Studies 45: Comparative Perspectives on the US-Mexican Borderlands

Latino Studies 51: Beyond Sex, Drugs, Rock and Roll: Radical Latinos in the 60’s

Native American Studies 30: Native Cultural Production: (Re)Mapping Race, Gender, and Nation

Native American Studies 42: Gender Issues in Native American Life

Philosophy 09: Love and Friendship

Philosophy 22: Feminism and Philosophy

Philosophy 50: Sexuality, Identity and Legal Theory

Public Policy 41: Sexuality, Identity, and the Law

Psychology and Brain Science 54: Psychology and Gender

Religion 13: Beyond God the Father: An Introduction to Gender and Religion

Religion 14: Women, Religion and Social Change

Religion 19: Gender and the Religious Imagination

Religion 19: Women in Islam and Judaism

Religion 31: Sex, Celibacy, and the Problem of Purity: Asceticism and the Human Body in Late Antiquity

Religion 40: Gods, Demons and Monkeys: The Ramayana Epic in India

Religion 42: Goddesses of India

Religion 48: Body and Sex in Chinese Religions

Religion 56: Women and the Bible

Religion 79: Feminist Ethics

Religion 80: The Bible, Sex, and Sexuality

Russian 38: Contemporary Russian Women Writers

Sociology 31: Youth and Society

Sociology 33: Self and Society

Sociology 39: Reproductive Rights and Technologies

Sociology 43: Dangerous Intersections: Race, Class, and Gender

Sociology 46: Constructing Black Womanhood

Sociology 49: Youth and Society

Spanish 50: Gender and Sexuality in Hispanic Studies

Spanish 62: Gender and Writing in Twentieth Century Spain

Spanish 62: Women Writers in Twentieth Century Spain

Spanish 72: Latin American and Latina Women: Gender, Culture, Literature

Spanish 78: Living in the Borderlands: Latino/a Culture and Identity

Spanish 79: Latino/a Literature: Between Literary Traditions, Languages, and Cultures

Theater 21: American Women Playwrights

Theater 21: Feminism and Theater

Theater 24: Engendering Asian Performance

Many other courses contain material of particular interest to students in Women’s and Gender Studies. To identify those related courses that would be most important in enriching their own program of study, students should consult with the Women’s and Gender Studies Chair.