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Program in Experimental and Molecular Medicine

COURSES IN EXPERIMENTAL AND MOLECULAR MEDICINE

101. Scientific Basis of Disease I

11F Offered every year

This course offers a general introduction to molecular medicine through principles from cell biology, molecular biology, neurobiology and physiology. Basic biological concepts will be integrated with clinical correlations and translational research. The class will meet 6 hours per week and combine both lectures and readings from the primary literature. Teaching modules will cover Integration of Biological Systems, Macromolecular Structure, Nuclear Processes, Protein Synthesis, turnover and trafficking, and Metabolism. Course director: Cole. Module leaders: Fejes-Toth, Cole, Kisselev.

102. Scientific Basis of Disease II

12W Offered every year

This course is a continuation of PEMM 101 and offers a general introduction to molecular medicine through principles from cell biology, molecular biology, neurobiology and physiology. Basic biological concepts will be integrated with clinical correlations and translational research. The class will meet 6 hours per week and combine both lectures and readings from the primary literature. Teaching modules will cover Plasma membrane receptors: channels and transporters, Plasma membrane receptors: adhesion, motility, proliferation and survival, Immunology and Inflammation. Course director: Cole. Module leaders: Maue, Shworak.

103. Biostatistics

11F Offered every year

This course is a survey of the biostatistical methods most often used in medical research, be it bench science, clinical research or translational science. The methods will be illustrated using studies relevant to research in molecular medicine. Course director: MacKenzie.

113. Advanced Endocrine Physiology (Identical to Physiology 113)

14F Offered every 4th year

This is a seminar course in which both students and faculty will present novel and important topics in Endocrine Physiology.

114. Advanced Respiratory Physiology (Identical to Physiology 114)

12W Offered every 4th year

This is an advanced seminar course covering specialized topics in respiratory physiology.

115. Neurosciences

12S Offered every year (On DMS calendar – offered in term III, mid-March until beginning of June)

The goal of the Neuroscience Course is to provide the student with the basic science background necessary to understand the clinical signs and symptoms of disorders of the human nervous system. The organization and function of the central and peripheral nervous systems will be presented from a correlated anatomical, physiological, and pharmacological perspective by means of lectures and conferences, and by laboratory exercises that incorporate dissection of the brain. Among the topics covered will be: the embryonic/fetal development of the nervous system; the gross and microscopic organization of the brain and spinal cord; the physiology of the neuron and neural transmission; control of motor and sensory functions; neuroendocrine control; control of involuntary functions; the special senses; the higher mental functions such as memory and language; the maintenance of consciousness and sleep; and the motivation and regulation of emotional states. In addition, the course will include an introduction to modern imaging modalities as they apply to neurological diagnosis and also will consider the interface between the brain and behavior.

Course director: R. Swenson.

116. Advanced Cardiovascular Physiology (Identical to Physiology 115)

Offered as requested

This is a seminar course in which both students and faculty will present novel and important topics in Endocrine Physiology. This course provides a systematic review of cardiac physiology; related topics, including circulatory physiology, vascular biology, and cardiovascular disease will also be discussed. Each class will center on 1-2 of the first 14 chapters in the book. The clinical topics covered in the last four chapters can be included in the student seminars. After reviewing this material, each student will select and present a brief seminar on a topic related to the material in the assigned chapter.

Course Director: Katz

117. Advanced Renal Physiology (Identical to Physiology 117)

13F Offered every 4th year

This lecture course will cover a broad range of topics in renal physiology. Ten, two hour lectures will be given by the Renal Faculty and there will be two written examinations. Medical Physiology 112 or an equivalent course is a prerequisite.

119. Advanced Immunology: Mucosal Immunity (Identical to Physiology 119)

Offered as requested

An advanced level immunology course on aspects of the mucosal immune system, including the secretory IgA response, intraepithelial lymphocyte function, specialized antigen presentation, lymphocyte recirculation and homing patterns, hormonal and cytokine regulation, etc. A comprehensive evaluation of the interface of the gastrointestinal and reproductive mucosal systems with the immune system will provide a basis for discussion of sexually transmitted infectious diseases including AIDS, gynecological cancers, and vaccine development considerations. Features of these mucosal immune systems will be compared and contrasted to that of the non-mucosal secondary lymphoid organs.

123. Graduate Toxicology (Identical to Pharmacology and Toxicology 123)

12W: Arrange. Offered every other year

This course provides an introduction to toxicology as a discipline, with a focus on the molecular basis for toxicity of chemicals in biological systems. Major topics include: principles of cell and molecular toxicology, xenobiotic metabolism, molecular targets of cellular toxicity, genetic toxicology, chemical carcinogenesis, immunotoxicology, neurotoxicology, clinical toxicology, and quantitative risk assessment.

Faculty lectures and discussion. This course is open to graduate, medical and advanced undergraduate students (with permission from the Course Director).

Course Director: C. Tomlinson.

124. Ethical Conduct of Research (Identical to Physiology 124 and Pharmacology and Toxicology 124)

12W: Arrange. Offered every year

This course is required for all PEMM and MCB graduate students. There will be approximately four one-and-a-half hour small group discussion sessions and four one hour lectures with the times to be arranged. Topics will include: mentoring, data collection, academic integrity, ethical use of human subjects and laboratory animals, authorship, sponsored research and intellectual property.

Faculty lectures and discussion. Course Directors: DeLeo, North.

126. Cancer Biology

13S: Arrange. Offered in alternate years

This course will present a comprehensive survey of the biology, biochemistry, pharmacology, and genetics of cancer. Students will become familiar with such areas as cancer terminology, epidemiology, carcinogenesis, tumor promotion, metastasis, oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, tumor viruses, growth factors, hormones, immunology, and therapy. Where possible, emphasis will be placed on the most recent cell and molecular aspects of cancer. The class will be in lecture format and meet for 3 hours each week.

Faculty lectures and discussion. Prerequisite: PEMM 101 and 102, or permission of instructor. Course director: Eastman.

128. Perinatal Physiology (Identical to Physiology 128)

Offered as requested

Selected topics in fetal and neonatal physiology.

Course Director: Darnall

131. Experimental Therapeutics & Drug Discovery (Identical to PHAR 131)

12S: Arrange Offered in alternate years

The course will present a practical survey of technical approaches to all stages of drug development and will include target identification, small molecule and biotherapeutic design and the development of therapeutic diagnostics. Topics will include pharmacogenomics, pharmacogenetics, functional genomics, global gene expression, proteomics, gene targeting, and drug development. The class will be in lecture format with student presentations of recent publications relevant to specific lectures. The class will meet for 3 hours each week.

Faculty lectures and discussion. Prerequisite: per-mission of instructor. Course Director: J. DiRenzo.

132. Physiological Systems Modeling (Identical to Physiology 132)

13S: Arrange. Offered in alternate years

This Ordinary, time-varying, nonlinear differential equations describe a wide range of physiological systems and responses. Students will learn to model dynamic physiological systems including excitable membrane phenomena, cardiovascular and respiratory system mechanics and control, and other systems of particular interest to each student. The orientation of the course is pragmatic rather than theoretical, and the goal of the course is to teach students how to construct and evaluate quantitative simulations of physiological phenomena using commonly available computer tools. There are no prerequisites for this course beyond successful completion of the first-year Physiology course. This course will be offered in alternate Spring terms, next in 2013, and will meet at the convenience of the participants.

Course Director: Daubenspeck

133. Pharmacology of Drug Development (Identical to PHAR 133)

12F: Arrange. Offered every year

This course will provide a solid foundation in the principles of pharmacology including pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, drug metabolism and biotransformation, bioavailability and receptor pharmacology. Emphasis is on how drugs are developed and the challenges and pitfalls that are involved in the drug development process using real-life examples. The class will be a combination of lecture format and student projects and presentations. The class will meet for approximately 3 hours each week.

Faculty lectures and student projects and presentations. Course Director: M. Spinella

150. Neurosciences I: Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience (Identical to Physiology 150)

13S: Arrange. Offered every year

This course is designed for students with a solid fundamental background in Neuroscience. Students should have completed Medical Neuroscience or the equivalent as a prerequisite. Students without this background who wish to take this course may do so with permission of the Instructor. Lectures will cover both classical papers relevant to cellular and molecular neuroscience as well as recent studies that highlight controversial and important findings in this field. Students will be required to read and critique original research papers. Discussion of these papers is an integral part of the course.

Course Director: Henderson

211. Neurobiology of Disease

12W: Arrange. Offered every year

This course will introduce students to the cellular and molecular processes that are pathologically altered in a variety of neurological diseases. Students will also learn by reading and presenting seminal papers on neurological disease topics how neuroscientists research the causes and potential treatments of the disease. The course will be team taught by experts from the neuroscience faculty who will give a one hour didactic lecture in the first session of the week. Then, in a 2 hour session later in that week, students will present and critique scientific papers on the topic chosen by the faculty for that week.

Faculty lectures and discussion. Prerequisite: For graduate students-—Neurosciences (spring term; R. Swenson, Course Director); For undergraduate students—must be senior Neuroscience major. Instructor: Lee (course director) and others.

271. Advanced Biomedical Sciences

12S: Arrange. Offered every year

This course emphasizes the integration of molecular, cellular, and systems level information and the experimental approaches used to understand physiology and pathophysiology. It is designed to provide graduate students with a more sophisticated understanding of the major systems of an organism and how they act and interact in order for an individual to adapt and survive in the face of changing environmental resources and challenges. The course is organized into week-long, “stand alone” modules that cover integrative, translational topics in immunology, cardiovascular physiology, endocrinology, and neurobiology (e.g.. influenza, congestive heart failure, sleep disorders, drug addiction, space physiology). Course meetings are a mixture of lectures and in-class discussions led by the participating faculty, as well as laboratory exercises and demonstrations, including human brain dissections, visits to clinical laboratories and diagnostic centers, and “hands on” opportunities with state-of-the-art electrophysiological and cardiovascular techniques. Course activities are supplemented by primary research articles, reviews, and other on-line materials. Instructor: Yeh.

275. Vascular Biology

12S: Arrange. Offered every year

The principles of development, organization and function of the cardiovascular tree in health and disease will be discussed in lecture format. Topics will include the physiology and regulation of vasculature as an organ system, the molecular and cellular biology of endothelial cell function, and the molecular basis of the disorders of the vascular system. Emphasis will be placed on molecular aspects of cardiovascular disease such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, inflammation and neovascularization. The course will meet 4 hours per week. Course materials will include current literature reviews and research articles.

Instructor: Stan.

137. Project Research (Qualifying Examination)

Summer term: Arrange

141. Research Rotation I

All terms: Arrange

142. Research Rotation II

All terms: Arrange

143. Research Rotation III

All terms: Arrange

297. Level I: part-time research: 1 course equivalent

All terms: Arrange

298. Level II: part-time research: 2 course equivalent

All terms: Arrange

299. Level III: full-time research: 3 course equivalent

All terms: Arrange