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Linguistics and Cognitive Science

COURSES IN LINGUISTICS

1. Introductory Linguistics

11F, 12S, 12F, 13S: 12

An introduction to the scientific description of human language. The course teaches methods of analyzing languages’ sound systems (phonology), word structure (morphology), sentence patterns (syntax), and systems of meaning (semantics and pragmatics). Some important implications of linguistics for the study of human cognition and cultural behavior will be discussed. This course is a prerequisite for all majors in linguistics. Open to all classes. Dist: QDS. Madigan (11F), Puju (12S), the staff (12F, 13S)

7. First-Year Seminar in Linguistics

Consult special listings

8. The Structure of Maori

12W, 13W: D.F.S.P. (New Zealand)

This course is an introduction to the structure of the Maori language. Emphasis is given to the morphology and syntax of basic Maori clause structure. This course is taught by a member of the Department of Maori Studies at the University of Auckland. Prerequisite: Linguistics 1 and one other Linguistics course in the 20s.

10. Language Acquisition (Identical to, and described under, Education 58)

12W: 10A

Open to all classes. Dist: SOC. Kay.

11. Topics in Linguistics

11F: 2A 12W: 10A 12F: 11 13W: 2A

In 11F, Words. This course explores all aspects of words. Among the topics are: theories of word meaning; synonyms, antonyms, and other relationships among word-meanings; changes in word meanings over time; word-borrowing among languages; the history of English vocabulary; how syllable structures differ between languages; how humans access words from the mental dictionary in real time; word-building from roots and affixes; compound words; slang and specialized vocabularies; how young children learn words. Ernst.

In 12W, Language and Politics of the Caucasus (Identical to Russian 11 and Government 40). One of the world’s areas with the highest linguistic and cultural diversity – the Caucasus forms an intricate web of Indo-European, Turkic, and over 50 indigenous languages. The course follows in parallel the complex historical-political development of the Caucasus and its cultural and linguistic history, under the hypothesis that one informs the other. We will study the dynamics between the linguistic features, oral and written traditions, language policies, and the major political trends in the region. No prerequisites. Dist: SOC; WCult: CI. Chitoran, Yalowitz.

17. Sociolinguistics

12S: 10A 13S: 2A

The field of sociolinguistics deals with the ways in which language serves to define and maintain group identity and social relationships among speakers. In this course we will consider such topics as regional and social variation in language; the relationship of language and ethnicity, sex and gender; language and social context; pidgin and creole languages; language endangerment and the fate of minority languages in the US and other countries; language planning, multiculturalism and education. Open to all classes. Dist: SOC; WCult: CI. Stanford (12S), the staff (13S)

18. History of the English Language (Identical to English 18)

12X: 11

The development of English as a spoken and written language as a member of the Indo-European language family, from Old English (Beowulf), Middle English (Chaucer), and Early Modern English (Shakespeare), to contemporary American English. Topics may include some or all of the following: the linguistic and cultural reasons for ‘language change,’ the literary possibilities of the language, and the political significance of class and race. Open to all classes. Dist: SOC. Pulju.

20. Experimental Phonetics

12W: 12

This course is an introduction to speech physiology, articulation, and the acoustic analysis of speech. Students will acquire knowledge of the experimental and computational techniques that are relevant for investigating the production of speech. This includes equipment functioning, data collection and recording techniques, techniques for analyzing speech acoustics, and analysis of data from a variety of languages. Prerequisite: Linguistics 1. Dist: TAS. Chitoran.

21. Introduction to Phonology

13W: 10

Phonology is the study of the system underlying selection and use of sounds in languages of the world. The course will introduce students to investigation of these topics from the perspective of recent theories of phonology. Readings, class discussions, and homework problems will provide a basis for understanding the origin, role, and uses of sound systems in spoken languages. Prerequisite: Linguistics 1. Dist: QDS. The staff.

22. Syntax

11F, 12F: 2

An introduction to the formal analysis of grammatical structure. The course aims to familiarize the student with Principles and Parameters Theory (PPT), the theoretical framework which currently dominates the field of syntax in North America. The course also provides an introduction to using data to support one syntactic analysis over another, and an overview of some of the major syntactic phenomena in the world’s languages. Prerequisite: Linguistics 1. Dist: QDS. Ernst (11F), the staff (12F).

23. Semantics and Pragmatics

13S: 10

An investigation of ‘meaning’ in language: word meaning, sentence meaning and its relation to syntactic structure, and the role of both linguistic and extra-linguistic context. Prerequisite: Linguistics 1. Dist: QDS. The staff.

24. Discourse Analysis

12S: 10

Discourse analysis examines linguistic structure that exists beyond the sentence level. In this course we will consider the structures of naturally occurring spontaneous speech (such as conversations, interviews, oral narratives) and those in written text. Special attention is given to the global priorities of connected speech and writing, including mechanisms of coherence and cohesion. Other topics include narrative structures, new and old information, topicalization, foregrounding and backgrounding, and the methods of conversational analysis and variation analysis. Prerequisite: Linguistics 1. Dist: SOC. Peterson.

25. Typology

13W: 1

This course is an introduction to the field of language typology. We begin by exploring the core assumptions and methods of the discipline, and by reviewing typologies based on word order and morphology. Then, we examine a variety of grammatical categories and constructions including tense/aspect, case, relative, clauses, serial verbs, and switch-reference. Throughout the course we will also consider the sorts of explanations which have been put forth to account for typological patterns. Prerequisite: Linguistics 1. Dist: SOC. The staff.

26. Morphology

13W: 12

Morphology is the study of word structure and word-formation processes, and how these interact with phonology, syntax, and the lexicon. This course focuses on analyzing morphological phenomena in a wide range of typologically diverse languages. Topics to be addressed include the place of word formation in relation to phonological and syntactic phenomena, as well as the contribution of morph-logical analysis to our understanding of lexical processing. We will consider the history of morphological theory in generative grammar, with special attention to recent approaches, including Distributed Morphology. Prerequisite: Linguistics 1. Dist: QDS. The staff.

27. Historical Linguistics

12W: 10

This course serves as an introduction to historical linguistics and the comparative method. Linguistic change on all levels (phonetic/phonological, morphological, syntactic and semantic) will be studied, with special attention to the problems of historical reconstruction. The course will investigate families in general, with emphasis on the Indo-European languages. Prerequisite: Linguistics 1 or Linguistics 18. Dist: QDS. Pulju.

35. Field Methods

11F: 10A 12F: 2A

This course provides an overview of issues that arise in collecting language data in the field. We will examine techniques used in the gathering and analysis of data and practical problems that confront the fieldworker. Prerequisites: Linguistics 21 and one other course in the 20s. Dist: QDS. Peterson (11F), the staff (12F).

50. Special Topics in Linguistics

12W: 12 13W: 10A

In 12W, Gothic. Introduction to the Gothic language as a representative of the Germanic branch of the Indo-European family. Student will learn Gothic grammar and vocabulary and will read and translate Gothic texts. In addition, they will learn the major diachronic changes (phonological, grammatical, and lexical) that Gothic underwent in its development from Proto-Indo-European by way of Proto-Germanic. Prerequisite: Linguistics 1, Linguistics 18, Greek 30, Latin 30, or permission of instructor. Pulju.

54. Foreign Study in Linguistics

12W, 13W: D.F.S.P. (New Zealand)

This course is one of two local courses that will be taken by linguistics students on the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program at the University of Auckland in New Zealand. The course will be taught by one or more faculty at the University of Auckland. Although the content of the course may vary, the course will normally be an advanced level course on an aspect of the languages of the Pacific, Maori culture or Maori language. Credit is awarded to students who have successfully completed the designated course at the University of Auckland. Prerequisite: Linguistics 1 and one other Linguistics course in the 20s. Dist: SOC.

80. Seminar in Linguistics

12S: 2A 31S: 11

In 12S, History of Linguistics. This course covers the history of linguistics from ancient times up until the present, concentrating on 20th century. Major themes include: the controversy over the status of linguistics as a science; the recurrent conflict between theoretical and applied linguistics; the relation of trends in linguistics to general contemporaneous intellectual trends; and the relative importance of social factors in determining the acceptance of particular linguists’ ideas. Specific theoretical issues will also be considered, such as: the nature and significance of the phoneme; the degree to which syntax is independent of semantics and pragmatics; realist vs. nominalist views of linguistic description; and formalist vs. functionalist disgreements over the autonomy of language. Prerequisite: two or more 20s-level LING courses, or permission of instructor. Dist:SOC. Pulju.

85. Independent Study and Research

All terms: Arrange

This course offers qualified students of linguistics the opportunity to pursue work on a topic of special interest through an individually designed program. Requires permission of the instructor and the Chair.

86. Honors Research

All terms: Arrange

87. Honors Thesis

All terms: Arrange

Linguistics 86 and 87 consist of independent research and writing on a selected topic under the supervision of a Program member who acts as advisor. Open to honors majors in Linguistics. Permission of the thesis advisor and the Chair required.

COURSES IN COGNITIVE SCIENCE

2. Cognition (Identical to, and described under, Psychology 28)

12S, 13S: 2

Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6 or Computer Science 1. Dist: SOC. Kelley.

26. Philosophy and Computers (Identical to, and described under, Philosophy 26)

12S, 13S: 10

Dist: TAS. Moor.

44. Artificial Intelligence (Identical to, and described under, Computer Science 76)

11W, 12W: 2

Prerequisite: Computer Science 8. Computer Science 30 is recommended. Dist: TAS. Zomordian

85. Independent Study and Research

All terms: Arrange

This course offers qualified students of cognitive science the opportunity to pursue work on a topic of special interest through an individually designed program. Requires permission of the instructor and the Chair.

86. Honors Research

All terms: Arrange

87. Honors Thesis

All terms: Arrange

Cognitive Science 86 and 87 consist of independent research and writing on a selected topic under the supervision of a Program member who acts as advisor. Open to honors majors in Cognitive Science. Permission of the thesis advisor and the Chair required.