Skip to main content

Notice

Information on this website is posted for historical reference only. Please visit the Office of the Registrar for current requirements.

History

INTRODUCTORY AND EXPERIMENTAL COURSES

There are no prerequisites to the History Major or Minor. Most of the courses listed in this section, however, are designed to be introductions to their respective fields of study. They presume no prior knowledge of the topic and are recommended as good entry points to the Department’s offerings. History 6 is the Department’s rubric for experimental courses that may or may not become permanent offerings.

1. The United States, 1763-1877

11F, 12F: 10A

An introduction to selected problems of national development in the period beginning with the American Revolution and ending with the Civil War and Reconstruction. Emphasis is placed on the critical assessment of historical writing and the interpretation of historical documents. There are no general course lectures; each student is assigned to a section which works under a single staff member. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: US & CAN; <1800. Cullon.

2. History of the United States since 1877

11F: 2A 12W: 10 13W: 11

History 2 carries forward the study of national development from 1877, but History 1 is not prerequisite. The course treats such issues as industrialization and its impact; changes in political behavior, ideology, and the American party system; the Black American and the consequences of racism; origins of the Cold War; and the emergence of modern welfare programs. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: US & CAN. Orleck.

3. Europe in Medieval and Early Modern Times

11F, 12F: 9

Emphasizing the analysis of primary sources, this course examines the foundation of Western European civilization from the fall of the Roman Empire to 1715. Topics include the origins of European nation states, the intellectual and cultural achievements of the Middle Ages and Renaissance, the rise of constitutionalism and absolutism, the economic and technological roots of Europe’s global dominance, as well as the social, political, and religious crises that divided the continent. Lectures and small discussion groups. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: EUR; <1700, <1800. Lagomarsino, Simons.

4. The Crusades

12S: 12 13S: 11

The crusades, launched by European Christians who sought to secure military control over the Holy Land, led to a period of sustained and largely inimical contact between Christian and Muslim cultures. Covering the period from 1095-ca.1350, this course explores the cultural, religious, and ideological contexts of crusade history which shaped notions of religious violence, holy war, and ethnic cleansing, along with a long history of distrust between the peoples of Christian Europe (or the Christian West) and the Islamic Middle East. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: INTER; <1700, <1800. Peixoto.

5.1. Pre-Colonial African History (Identical to African and African American Studies 14)

11F: 12 13W: 10

This course will examine the social and economic history of Africa to 1800. Several interrelated themes of social organization, the expansion of trade, rise of new social classes, the emergence and disintegration of various states and European intervention will be discussed. Through our readings, we will visit every major historical region of Africa (north, east, central, west and south) at least once during the semester to illuminate the various themes. Dist: SOC; WCult: NW. Major Dist: AALAC; <1700, <1800. Sackeyfio.

5.2. Introduction to the Modern Middle East

11F: 12 12F: TBA

This course introduces students to the politico-cultural and social cosmos of the Ottoman Empire from 1400s until its disintegration in 1918. It focuses on the intricate, conflict -ridden and sometimes violent encounters among the categories of religion, sexuality and social status. Drawing on scholarly discussions, primary and secondary sources, legal texts, and case studies, this course examines the anxieties, contradictions, and conflicts that that defined the societal margins of the Ottoman Empire. Dist: INT or SOC; WCult: NW. Major Dist: AALAC. Turkyilmaz.

5.3. The History of China since 1800

12F: 11

This survey course traces China’s social, political, and cultural development from the relative peace and prosperity of the high Qing period, through the devastating wars and imperialist incursions of the nineteenth century, to the efforts, both vain and fruitful, to build an independent and powerful new nation.

Open to all classes. Dist: SOC; WCult: NW. Major Dist: AALAC.

5.4. The Rise of Asia

12S: 10

This is an introductory survey of Asian history, covering roughly the last 200 years of political, social, cultural and economic developments in the area that may be referred to as “monsoon Asia”: from Pakistan in the west to Japan in the east. Course topics include: the notion of “Asia”; states and societies around 1800; colonial experience and nationalism; World War II and decolonization; Cold War and “hot” wars; postwar economic developments; and cultural and economic globalization. Dist: SOC; WCult: NW. Major Dist: AALAC. Yeo.

5.5. The Emergence of Modern Japan

11F: 10A

A survey of Japanese history from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Topics to be covered include the building of a modern state and the growth of political opposition, industrialization and its social consequences, the rise and fall of the Japanese colonial empire, and the postwar economic ’miracle.’ Dist: SOC; WCult: NW. Major Dist: AALAC. Ericson.

5.6. Pre-Columbian and Colonial America (Identical to Latin American and Caribbean Studies 10)

Not offered in the period from 11F through 13S

Open to all classes. Dist: SOC; WCult: NW. Major Dist: AALAC; <1700, <1800.

5.8. Africa and the World (Identical to African and African American Studies 19)

12S: 2A 13W: 3B

This course focuses on links between Africa and other parts of the world, in particular Europe and Asia. Readings, lectures, and discussions will address travel and migration, economics and trade, identity formation, empire, and cultural production. Rather than viewing Africa as separate from global processes, the course will address historical phenomena across oceans, deserts, cultures, and languages to demonstrate both the diversity of experiences and the long-term global connections among disparate parts of the world. Dist: INT or SOC; WCult: NW. Major Dist: INTER. Lamothe.

5.9. Colonialism, Nationalism and Revolution in Southeast Asia

11F: 10 13S: 10

This course offers an overview of the political history of Southeast Asia from the early nineteenth century to the present. It examines the character of pre-colonial states, the development of European imperialism and the nature of colonial rule, the emergence of nationalism, the process of decolonization (with a focus on the Vietnamese Revolution), authoritarian and non-authoritarian regimes in post-colonial Southeast Asia, the mass killings in Cambodia and Indonesia, and movements for democracy in the Philippines, Indonesia and Burma (Myanmar).

Open to all classes. Dist: SOC; WCult: NW. Major Dist: AALAC. Yeo.

6. Experimental Courses in History

12W: 10, 2A 12S: 2A, 10, 10A

In 12W at 10 (Section 1), The History of the American West (Identical to, and described under, Native American Studies 30).

In 12W at 10 (Section 2), Caribbean History, 1898 to the Present (Identical to, and described under, African and African American Studies 83.4). Major Dist: US & CAN. Goldthree.

In 12W at 2A (Section 3), The Life, Death and Rebirth of Great American Cities. This course examines key moments in the histories of four diverse American cities: New York, New Orleans, Las Vegas and Los Angeles: two old and two new cities, two cities that grew organically over centuries, with deep resources and deep problems, and two glitzy cities that grew too rapidly, booming and crashing over the half century after World War II. Students will research, write and present urban history projects on a city of their choosing. Major Dist: US & CAN. Orleck.

In 12W at 10 (Section 4), Transnational Migrations in African-American History. This course follows the journeys, imagined and real, that people of African descent have taken across the Atlantic World from the Middle Passage to the present. We will proceed chronologically, giving attention to numerous themes, including diaspora, community formation, empire and nation, and urbanization. Ultimately, we will follow our subjects as their lives crossed regional, national, political, and linguistic borders from the U.S. to Africa, the Caribbean and Latin America, and Europe. Major Dist: INTER. Johnson.

In 12W at 10 (Section 5), History of Modern Indonesia. This course examines the socioeconomic history of Indonesia from the “Age of Commerce” (1450-1680) to the present. Bordered by the Indian Ocean and the Pacific Ocean, the Indonesian archipelago has been exposed to cross-cultural contact and trans-regional trade with Indian, Arabic, Chinese, and European societies, for centuries. Contact with other worlds and the mobility of Indonesians constituted the diverse and dynamic histories of modern Indonesia, and contributed to the “imagining” of a new nation. Major Dist: AALAC. Yeo

In 12S at 2A (Section 1), War and Society in Early America. Beginning with the military practices of indigenous peoples before 1492 and continuing through the imperial contests for control of the continent until the Mexican-American War, warfare is examined as a human experience profoundly influencing societies and identities. The traditional emphasis on battles and leaders in military history will not be ignored, but the primary goal of this course is to appreciate how war shaped the intimate as well as geopolitical aspects of early American history. WCult: W. Major Dist: US & CAN. Cullon.

In 12S at 10A (Section 2). Nationalism and Revolution in the Caribbean (Identical to, and described under African and African American Studies 86 and Latin American and Caribbean Studies 54). Dist: SOC or INT; WCult: NW. Major Dist: AALAC. Goldthree.

In 12S at 10 (Section 3). Women and Gender in the African Diaspora. This course focuses on the lived experiences of—and structural limitations placed upon—women of African descent from the era of the trans-Atlantic slave trade through the early twentieth century. We will examine a number of critical themes, including power, labor, geography and migration, racism, sexuality, spirituality, and a host of other dynamics impacting women. Importantly, however, we will also focus on the many ways in which these women “talked back” to the larger world. WCult: W. Major Dist: INTER. Johnson.

In 12S at 2A (Section 4). Science and Technology in the Making of Modern Korea. (Identical to, and described under, Asian and Middle Eastern Studies 21). WCult: NW. Major Dist: AALAC. Suh.

In 13W at 2A, The Life, Death and Rebirth of Great American Cities

In 13S at 10, Caribbean History, 1898 to the Present

In 13S at 10A, Epidemics in History: Etiologies and Ideologies

7. First-Year Seminars in History

Consult special listings

8. Body Parts, Body Wholes: An Introduction to the Comparative History of Medicine

12W: 11

This course examines the possibilities and problems of comparing medicine across time and region. We will begin by considering divergent conceptions of body in Chinese and Greek antiquity before moving on to the transformation of the healing traditions and the advance of modern biomedicine since 1800. Instead of imposing “holism” or “reductionism” on medical traditions, this course encourages students to view past expressions of medicine as a means of analyzing our own self here and now. Dist: SOC or INT; WCult: NW. Major Dist: INTER. Suh.

UNITED STATES AND CANADA

10. Colonial America

12S: 10A

A study of the foundations of American civilization. Attention is focused on the ways in which new world conditions influenced the peoples, ideas, and institutions transplanted from Europe. The course also includes material on the ways in which Europeans interacted with Native Americans and Africans in the New World.

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: INTER; <1700, <1800. Cullon.

11. The Age of the American Revolution

12X: 2A

This course begins with an examination of relations between England and its American Colonies in the middle of the eighteenth century. It deals with the collapse of British authority in America, emphasizing the social and intellectual sources of rebellion. Treatment of the war years focuses more on the problem of political and economic adjustment than on military history. The final topic covered is the adoption of a federal Constitution.

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: US & CAN; <1800. Cullon.

12. The American Civil War

12W, 13S: 9

The American Civil War was a defining moment in American history. This course examines the causes of the conflict, the war itself, and the period of Reconstruction up to 1877. Topics to be discussed include the diplomatic conduct of the war, political developments in both the north and the south, military developments, the question of race and slavery, emancipation, the participation of African Americans in the war, the women’s rights movement and the involvement of women in the war, and medical advances. The social and economic aspects of the war will receive as much emphasis as military and political developments.

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: US & CAN. Bonner.

13. History of New England

12X: 10A

The course focuses primarily on developments within New England but involves some discussion of the region’s historical relationship with the rest of the United States and with Canada. Specific topics include the logic of regionalism, the origins of the six New England states, town founding, the dynamics of economic change, immigration and ethnicity, education (both public and private), regional literature, historic preservation, and patterns of community development. The course covers the entire history of the region and concludes with a section on ‘New England Today.’

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: US & CAN; <1800. Cullon.

14. The Invasion of America: American Indian History, Pre-Contact to 1830 (Identical to Native American Studies 14)

11F, 12F: 10

This course surveys the history of the American Indians from contact with Europeans to c. 1830. It provides an overview of the major themes and trends in Indian history, supplemented by case studies from a number of regions and readings that illuminate particular issues. The overall context of the course is the conflict generated by the colonial drive of European nations and the U.S. and their citizens, but the primary focus is the historical experience of Indian peoples and their struggles to retain their cultures and autonomy while adapting to great changes in the conditions of their lives.

Open to all classes. Dist: SOC; WCult: NW. Major Dist: US & CAN; <1700, <1800. Calloway.

15. American Indian History: 1830 to Present (Identical to Native American Studies 15)

12S: 10 13S: 9

This course surveys the history of the American Indians from the year 1830 to the present day. It provides an overview of the major themes and trends in Indian history, supplemented by case studies from a number of regions and readings that illuminate particular issues. The overall context of the course is the expansion of the U.S., the ’Indian policies’ adopted by the U.S. government, but the primary focus is the historical experience of Indian peoples and their struggles to retain the cultures and autonomy while adapting to great changes in the conditions of their lives.

Open to all classes. Dist: SOC; WCult: NW. Major Dist: US & CAN. Calloway.

16. Black America to the Civil War (Identical to African and African American Studies 12)

11F: 10

This course deals with the African heritage, origins of white racial attitudes toward blacks, the slave system in colonial and ante-bellum America, and free Black society in North America. Specific emphasis will be placed on the Afro-American experience and on the relationship between blacks and whites in early American society.

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: US & CAN; <1800. Johnson

17. Black America since the Civil War (Identical to African and African American Studies 13)

12W: 11

This course is a continuation of History 16. Among the topics to be discussed are Black Reconstruction, segregation and disfranchisement, migration, nationalism, Blacks and the New Deal, the impact of war on Blacks, and the 1960s.

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: US & CAN. Rickford.

18. United States Political History in the Nineteenth Century

13S: 12

This course studies the growth of the American political system. It will examine the development of both formal and informal political institutions as well as the forces which have shaped these institutions. Among the topics considered are the growth of political parties, Jeffersonian and Jacksonian influences, sectionalism, and the breakdown of the political system, and the political effects of expansion, industrialization, immigration, and urbanization.

Open to all classes. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: US & CAN.

19. United States Political History in the Twentieth Century

12F: 2

This course defines and examines major themes in the development of twentieth century American politics. There are two versions of this course.

In 12F: This lecture course explores politics, the presidency, and national policy-making in the twentieth century. Special attention will be paid to the evolution of parties, how individual presidents have defined the powers of the presidency, and to the different ways that modern presidents have responded to changing external demands for national leadership in times of prosperity and peace, economic depression, domestic upheaval, and war.

Open to all classes. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: US & CAN.

20. American Thought and Culture to 1865

Not offered in the period from 11F through 13S

Open to all classes. Dist: TMV; WCult: W. Major Dist: US & CAN; <1800.

21. Modern American Thought and Culture

Not offered in the period from 11F through 13S

Open to all classes. Dist: TMV; WCult: W. Major Dist: US & CAN.

23. Recent United States History

12W: 2 12X: 11

This course will focus on the United States in the period following World War II. It will examine both domestic and international themes, exploring relationships between the two. Specific topics will include U.S. policy in Europe and Asia, National Security, the economy, developments in organized labor, political repression in the 1950s, political parties, mass culture, intellectual and artistic innovations, the civil rights movement, and the student protest movement.

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: US & CAN. Rickford.

24. American Foreign Relations to 1900

Not offered in the period from 11F through 13S

Open to all classes. Dist: SOC or INT; WCult: W. Major Dist: US & CAN; <1800.

25. American Foreign Relations since 1900

11F: 11 13S: 12

This course explores the expansion of American diplomatic, military and economic power since 1900, with particular attention to the ways that ideas and culture have shaped America’s relations with the world. Specific topics include: U.S. imperialism in the Philippines and elsewhere; U.S. anti-imperialism; America’s overseas nation building ventures; Wilsonianism; U.S. intervention in the World Wars; the Cold War; and American relations with the “Third World.”

Open to all classes. Dist: SOC or INT; WCult: W. Major Dist: US & CAN. Edsforth.

26. The Vietnam War

12S: 2 12F: 12

This course examines the conflict which Americans call “The Vietnam War” as a major event in the 20th century histories of both the United States and Vietnam. In addition to exploring the key decisions made by U.S. and Vietnamese leaders, students will also learn about the experiences of ordinary soldiers and civilians. This course incorporates multiple American and Vietnamese sources and perspectives, and also investigates multiple explanations of the war’s origins and outcome.

Open to all classes. Dist: SOC or INT; WCult: W. Major Dist: INTER. Miller.

27. Gender and Power in American History from the Colonial Period to the Civil War (Identical to Women’s and Gender Studies 23.1)

12S: 11

This course examines the history of men and women from the period of colonial settlement to the achievement of woman’s suffrage. We will explore the construction of gender particularly as it relates to social, political, economic, and cultural power. Topics will include: the role of gender in political thought and practice, the intersection of gender with categories of class and race; gender in the debate over slavery and the Civil War; and the rise and evolution of the woman’s rights movement.

Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: US & CAN; <1800. Butler.

28. American Women’s History, Civil War to the Present (Identical to Women’s and Gender Studies 23.2)

12W: 10A

This course is a multi-cultural multi-media history of American women from the Civil War to the present. We will discuss race and class tensions in the woman suffrage movement; women, labor and radicalism from the 1910s through the 1940s; civil rights, welfare rights, the rebirth of feminism in the 1960s and 70s, and backlash politics from the 1950s to the 1980s.

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: US & CAN. Orleck.

29. Women and American Radicalism Left and Right (Identical to Women’s and Gender Studies 26.1)

12F: 12

This course will trace the involvement of U.S. women in radical political movements from the mid-nineteenth century to the present including: Abolitionism; Anti-lynching; Socialist Trade Unionism; the Ku Klux Klan; the Communist Party; the National Welfare Rights Organization; the Civil Rights Movement; the New Left; the New Right; the direct-action wing of the anti-abortion movement; Earth First; and the neo-Nazi American Front. It will also examine the relationship between feminist ideologies and non-gender-specific radical political ideologies centered on race, class, and other social identifiers.

Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors. Dist: SOC; WCult: CI. Major Dist: US & CAN.

30. American Economic and Business History

Not offered in the period from 11F through 13S

Open to all classes. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: US & CAN.

31. Latinos in the United States: Origins and Histories

Not offered in the period from 11F through 13S

Open to all classes. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: INTER.

32. Asians in the Americas to 1905

13S: 11

This course traces migrations from China, the Philippines, South Asia, Japan, and Korea to the Americas and Hawai’i as well as U.S. colonial policies in Hawai’i, Guam, Samoa, and the Philippines through 1905. Major themes include labor migration, immigrant exclusion, racialization, anti-Asian violence, and urban ethnic enclave formation. Throughout, we will attend to differences and similarities in the political and social statuses of these groups, as well as their unique gender and class dynamics.

Open to all classes. Dist: SOC; WCult: CI. Major Dist: INTER.

33. Asian America in the Twentieth Century

12S: 11 12F: 12

The U.S. held different meanings for people from China, the Philippines, Korea, Japan, India, and Southeast Asia during the twentieth century when they arrived as colonial labor migrants; subjects of a nascent Japanese empire, refugees, orphans, and war brides displaced by U.S. militarism; or as exiles challenging imperialism or corrupt regimes in their homelands. In the U.S., they fought against discrimination, pursued civil rights, and settled. We compare and contrast these experiences in their course.

Open to all classes. Dist: SOC; WCult: CI. Major Dist: INTER. Kim.

34. Building America: An Architectural and Social History (Identical to Art History 52)

12S: 11

This course draws upon recent scholarship in anthropology, archaeology, material culture, social history and architectural history in its review of five centuries of American architecture. Course lectures not only emphasize America’s principal architects and their designs, but also summarize the social and cultural forces that shaped the country’s built landscape. Dist: ART; WCult: W. Major Dist: US & CAN; <1800. Heck.

35. The Creation of ’America’ in the Age of Jefferson

Not offered in the period from 11F through 13S

Open to all classes. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: US & CAN; <1800.

36. Health Care in American Society: History and Current Issues

11F, 12F: 11

This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of critical issues in health care through the study of the historical development of the United States health care system. The course illuminates the influence of historical forces and cultural factors on the delivery of health care and on the discourse about health care reform in American history. By studying the components and relationships within the American health care system, students are enabled to acquire an understanding of the relationship between American history and the health care system, and also enabled to obtain a working contextual knowledge of the current problems of the American health care system and their proposed solutions. Each topic is presented from an historical perspective. Through an historical investigation of health, disease, and medicine students should be able to understand and discuss the changing organization of health care delivery in American history, the changing methods of financing of health care, the distinctive role of technology in health care, primary ethical issues in health care, comparative features of health care systems of other cultures, the historical changes in public health precepts, images of health care in popular culture, and the process of health care reform in American history.

Open to all classes. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: US & CAN. Koop.

37. Black Radical Tradition in America (Identical to African and African American Studies 24)

Not offered in the period from 11F through 13S

Open to all classes. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: US & CAN.

38. American Odysseys: Lewis and Clark, Indian Country, and the New Nation (Identical to, and described under, Native American Studies 38).

12W, 13W: 2

Dist: SOC; WCult: NW. Major Dist: US & CAN; <1700, <1800. Calloway.

EUROPE

40. Foreign Study Program: London in History

11F, 12F: D.F.S.P.

Through lectures, readings, discussions, and fieldwork this course explores aspects of London’s history from medieval to modern times. Using the city itself as a living laboratory for historical thinking, the course relates the development of London and its neighborhoods to the larger concentric histories of nation, region, empire, and world.

Prerequisite: membership in the Foreign Study Program. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: EUR. Bonner.

41. Foreign Study Program: History Study Abroad

11F, 12F: D.F.S.P.

Graded credit for this course is awarded to students who have successfully completed an approved course offered by the History faculty of University College London while a member of the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program in History. Selections for 2010 include: “The Remaking of the English Working Class, 1660-1785”; “Remembering Slavery: Britain, Colonial Slavery and Abolition”; “Marx and History”; “Making of a Multicultural City”; “Crime and Popular Disorder in Georgian England” and “Everyday Life in 20th Century European Dictatorships.”

Prerequisite: membership in the Foreign Study Program. Bonner.

42. Gender and European Society from Antiquity to the Reformation (Identical to Women’s and Gender Studies 22.1)

Not offered in the period from 11F through 13S

Open to all classes. Dist: TMV; WCult: CI. Major Dist: EUR; <1700, <1800.

43. European Intellectual and Cultural History, 400-1300

12W: 10

A course on the intellectual and cultural origins of European civilization, from the fall of Rome to the advent of the Renaissance. After a review of the Judeo-Christian, Greco-Roman, Celtic, and Germanic components of medieval culture, we will examine the rise of the Christian Church and its impact on values and behavior of Europeans during the middle ages. Of special interest will be the relationship between medieval thinkers and the society in which they lived, the role of ritual, ceremony, and magic, and the persistence of heresy. Along with the products of high culture associated with such intellectuals as Augustine, Peter Abelard, Hildegard of Bingen, and Thomas Aquinas, we will thus review the fundamental values of medieval society at large and explore ways in which popular and elite culture converged or contrasted.

Open to all classes. Dist: TMV; WCult: W. Major Dist: EUR; <1700, <1800. Simons.

44. Medieval France, 400-1494

13S: 2

The course traces the medieval foundations of the French nation, from the Roman Era to the end of the fifteenth century, with emphasis on institutional, social, and cultural development. Topics include: the Merovingian origins of ’France,’ the construction and impact of feudal relationships, the emergence of French vernacular culture, regional diversity within centralized rule, and the formation of a French national identity. In addition we will examine how French medieval history became a testing-ground for innovative research on the Middle Ages, and to what extent these views have changed our concept of medieval France in the last decades.

Open to all classes. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: EUR; <1700, <1800.

45. Early Modern Europe (1300-1650)

11F: 12

A study of Western Europe’s transition from medieval to modern times, tracing the impact of new forces on traditional structures. Among the topics covered are Italian culture and society in the 14th-15th centuries; the concept of the Renaissance; intellectual and religious themes of the Reformation; the emergence of the basic forms of the modern state; developments in warfare and international relations; the political and ideological polarization of Europe after Luther; the ’general crisis’ of the mid-17th century.

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: EUR; <1700, <1800. Lagomarsino.

46. Spain in the Golden Age

12W: 12 12F: 2

The course deals with the unification of Spain under Ferdinand and Isabella, its rise to world primacy in the sixteenth century, and its decline in the seventeenth. Among topics examined are the development of a system of imperial government, the impact on Spain of colonial empire, the problems of multi-cultural society within the Iberian peninsula, the struggle against heresy, and the political challenges of the great European powers.

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: EUR; <1700, <1800. Lagomarsino.

47. The French Revolution and Napoleon

13S: 11

The course studies the French Revolution and its implications for Europe and the world. It considers the social, political and ideological causes of the Revolution in 1789 and then pays close attention to the successive stages of revolution from the experiment with constitutional monarchy to the radical republic and the Terror to Napoleon’s popular dictatorship. The revolutionary wars, the development of democratic and nationalist ideology and their spread beyond France and beyond Europe, and also beyond elite men to peasants, city workers, Blacks and women are important themes.

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Darrow. Major Dist: EUR; <1800.

48. European Society in the Industrial Age

12F: 10

This course traces the transformation of Western European society through the industrial period from the mid-18th century to the mid-20th century. Focusing upon social class and gender, it examines how economic and social change intertwined to produce the world’s first industrial societies. Work, family, leisure and nationalism are topics of specific attention. Although the course deals primarily with the core societies of Western Europe—France, Germany and Great Britain—it provides the opportunity for student research in other areas such as Italy, Ireland, Spain and Eastern Europe.

Open to all students. Dist: SOC; WCult: CI. Major Dist: EUR.

49. Early Modern England, 1485-1780

11F, 12F: 10

This course explores the relationships among economic, social, cultural and political developments in England during the Tudor, Stuart, and Hanoverian periods. Topics for discussion include: family and gender; village and city life; religious reformation and the reformation of government; the Elizabethan renaissance; responses to poverty, crime, and nonconformity; the development of political parties; the British enlightenment; commercialization and consumerism; the interaction of ’plebeians’ and ’patricians’; rebellions and civil wars; and radicalism, conservatism, and imperialism.

Open to all classes. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: EUR; <1700, <1800. Estabrook.

50. Modern Britain, 1780 to Present

12S, 13S: 10

This course explores the relationships among economic, social, cultural and political developments in Britain from the modern industrial revolution to Thatcherism and New Labour. Topics for discussion include: industrialization and its effects; Liberals, Conservatives, and Parliamentary politics; enduring Victorian attitudes about class, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, and race; the rise of Labour politics; suffragism; the Irish question; the impact of imperialism and world wars on British subjects; and responses to Britain’s postwar decline and post-colonial multiculturalism.

Open to all classes. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: EUR. Estabrook.

51. Modern European Intellectual History

11F, 13W: 10

Through a close reading and discussion of Europe’s most influential thinkers from the advent of the Enlightenment to the end of the twentieth century, this course will explore the key concepts that shaped and reflected modern European experiences. We will discuss how European intellectuals of diverse background—social scientists and philosophers, theologians and political theorists—fiercely debated the causes and solutions to major European phenomena, including technological revolution, total war, social upheaval, secularization, and terrorism.

Open to all classes. Dist: TMV; WCult: W. Major Dist: EUR; <1800. Greenberg.

52. Modern Germany: 1871-1990

12W, 13S: 10

This course will explore the dramatic transformations that permeated German culture, politics, and society from 1871 to the end of the Cold War. We will discuss the diverse trends, visions and anxieties that shaped German life through the birth of the German state, industrialization and expansion, World War I, the creation of the Weimar Republic, the rise of Nazism, total War and genocide, and the country’s division between Communist dictatorship and Western democracy during the Cold War.

Open to all classes. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: EUR. Greenberg.

53. World War II: Ideology, Experience, Legacy

11F, 13W: 2

This course will explore the origins, nature, and legacies of the most dramatic war in modern times. Rather than focusing only on the military aspect, we will discuss the different ideological, cultural, political, and social factors that intersected in this monumental conflict. Students will learn about the worldviews that led to the war; the experiences of soldiers, policymakers, and ordinary people at the home fronts; and the institutions and cultures that emerged at the war’s aftermath.

Open to all classes. Dist: TMV; WCult: W. Major Dist: EUR; <1800. Greenberg.

54. The Russian Empire

12S: 9

After a review of Kievan and Muscovite antecedents, the course surveys the history of Russia from the Time of Troubles to the beginning of the twentieth century. Special emphasis will be placed on the role of the Russian autocrat, on the institution of serfdom, and the development of the 19th century intelligentsia. Intended to precede, but not prerequisite to, History 55.

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: INTER; <1700, <1800. Whelan.

55. The Russian Revolutions and the New Regime

Not offered in the period from 11F through 13S

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: EUR.

56. Twentieth-Century Russia

Not offered in the period from 11F through 13S

57. Scientific Revolutions and Modern Society

11F: 12 12X: 12

An introduction to major revolutions in Western science since 1700, focusing on changing definitions of science; on political and religious implications of scientific theories; and on the effect of national contexts on scientific practice. Topics include Newton and Newtonianism in the 18th century, the Darwinian Revolution, Einstein and the birth of modern physics, and science under ’banners’ in revolutionary France, Nazi Germany, and Soviet Russia.

Open to all classes. Dist: TMV; WCult: W. Major Dist: INTER; <1800. Kremer.

58. History of the Holocaust (Identical to, and described under, Jewish Studies 37.1)

Not offered in the period from 11F through 13S

Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: INTER.

59. History of Warfare

12S: 11

This course examines the relationship between warfare and the way society has developed in the past. Primary emphasis will be placed on the evolution of Western society, showing how political, economic, social and technological developments governed the decisions achieved in war and vice versa. Warfare is a cultural activity and the story of war looms large in the history of western civilization. Topics will include human aggressiveness, the origins of organized conflict, violence limitations and just war theories, bronze and iron warfare, Greek hoplite warfare, Alexander the Great, the Roman legions, the Chinese way of war, barbarian kingdoms, feudal warfare, the crusades and the Mongols, the military revolution, limited warfare during the Age of Reason, the French Revolution and Napoleon, Nineteenth-Century warfare, the commercialization and industrialization of war, World War I and II.

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: INTER; <1700, <1800. Whelan.

61. Britain and the Atlantic World, 1480-1780

11F, 12F: 2A

This course focuses on Atlantic society, economy, politics and culture shaped by the nature of maritime life in early modern times. Topics include: British voyages of trans-Atlantic exploration; the effects of trans-Atlantic contacts on communal life and settlement patterns; navies, merchant seamen, and pirates; the slave trade; life in port towns and coastal villages; the lore and creative traditions of Anglo-American maritime culture; and the impact of European competition on the British vision of an Anglo-Atlantic world.

Open to all students. Dist: SOC or INT; WCult: W. Major Dist: INTER; <1700, <1800. Estabrook.

62. The First World War

13S: 9

The First World War was fought in Europe for the most art but it involved belligerents from every continent and had global effects, many of which bedevil our world today. This course introduces you to the vast subject of what the British still call The Great War, its causes, combat, homefronts and far-reaching consequences as well as to some of the unresolved questions that continue to propel our research.

Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: INTER.

63. History of Recent Science and Technology

12S: 10A

This course will consider selected case studies of scientific and technological work since 1960, using analytical tools from science studies, historical sociology, philosophy of science and gender studies. Participants will read classic books deploying these tools, and then will research and present their own case studies on topics such as the development of the personal computer, invention of the “abortion pill” RU-486, or disposal of high level nuclear waste.

Open to all classes. Dist: TMV; WCult: W. Major Dist: EUR. Kremer.

64. Modern Europe: The Enlightenment Through the First World War

12W: 11

An examination of the major political, social, economic and cultural developments in Europe from the early eighteenth century through the First World War. In this crucial period of world history, Europe generated the Enlightenment, constitutional democracy, industrial capitalism, advanced technology and global imperialism. Topics include: political revolutions in France, the Germanies and Russia; the industrial revolution and its consequences; liberalism, nationalism and imperialism, the rise of socialism and world wars over the course of two centuries.

Open to all classes. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: EUR. Koop.

65. Modern Europe: The Twentieth Century

12S, 13W: 11

An examination of major political, social, economic, and cultural developments in twentieth century Europe. Topics to be treated include the impact of the World Wars and Cold War, the Great Depression, the growth of totalitarianism, the recession and integration of Europe. A subsidiary focus of the course will be the perspective taken on these developments by some major European thinkers.

Open to all classes. Dist: SOC or INT; WCult: W. Major Dist: EUR. Koop.

AFRICA, ASIA, LATIN AMERICA AND CARIBBEAN

66. History of Africa since 1800 (Identical to African and African American Studies 15)

12S: 10A 13S: 10

This course explores some of the major historical processes unfolding in Africa since 1800. Our analysis will focus on social and economic history as we examine Africa’s integration into the international economy during the nineteenth century, the rise of new social classes, and the creation of the colonial and post-colonial state. Our primary case studies will be drawn from east, west and southern Africa to highlight both the similarities and differences of their historical development.

Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors. Dist: SOC; WCult: NW. Major Dist: AALAC. Lamothe.

67. The History of Modern South Africa (Identical to African and African American Studies 46)

11F: 10 13W: 12

After an initial overview of colonialism in Africa, this course will concentrate on Southern Africa, with special emphasis on the historical development, effects, and implications of the racial situation in the Republic of South Africa. Readings will be drawn from primary and secondary materials and from works of fiction. Illustrative films will be shown, and some opportunity offered to compare the history of race relations in South Africa with that in other African countries and in the United States.

Open to all classes. Dist: SOC; WCult: NW. Major Dist: AALAC. Sackeyfio.

68. History of North Africa from the Arrival of Islam to the Present (Identical to African and African American Studies 52)

12F: 10A

This course offers an introduction to the history of North Africa from its conversion to Islam to its current, transnational political and social formations. Focusing on religion and conversion, Sufism and mysticism, French and Italian colonialism, trade and economic history, environment, the region’s engagement with the Sahara, literature and culture, and migration, assignments will emphasize major themes in the social, political, economic, and cultural history of the region.

Open to all classes. Dist: SOC; WCult: NW; Major Dist: AALAC.

69. Islam in Africa (Identical to African and African American Studies 53)

13W: 10A

This course aims to introduce students to the formation of Islam in the Maghrib, Saharan Africa, and Africa south of the desert. Assignments will address continuities with and differences from the practices of Muslims in other parts of the world while emphasizing the central role the religion has played in the unfolding of history in various parts of Africa. Topics covered will include conversion, popular religion and mysticism, cultural formations, and social organization.

Open to all students. Dist: SOC; WCult: CI; Major Dist: AALAC.

70. On the Margins of the Ottoman Empire: Heresy, Desire and Slavery

12W: 12

This course introduces students to the politico-cultural and social cosmos of the Ottoman Empire from 1400s until its disintegration in 1918. It focuses on the intricate, conflict-ridden and sometimes violent encounters among the categories of religion, sexuality and social status, which idealized certain groups, life-styles and practices as desirable while stigmatizing other as marginal and dangerous. Drawing on scholarly discussions, primary and secondary sources, legal texts, and case studies, this course examines anxieties, contradictions, conflicts that defined the societal margins of the Ottoman Empire.

Open to all classes. Dist: SOC; WCult: CI. Major Dist: AALAC. Turkyilmaz.

71. Social History of the Contemporary Middle East

Not offered in the period from 11F through 13S

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Dist: SOC; WCult: NW. Major Dist: AALAC.

72. Imperial China in a Global Context

13S: 2A

China’s history, from the 3rd century BCE to the twentieth century, examined in the context of global developments in demography, economy, urbanization, technology, trade, and the arts.

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Dist: SOC; WCult: NW. Major Dist: AALAC; <1700, <1800.

73. Early Chinese Culture (Identical to, and described under, Chinese 62.1)

Not offered in the period from 11F through 13S

Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Major Dist: AALAC; <1700, <1800.

74. Intellectual History of East Asia

13W: 11

A comparative exploration of Chinese and Japanese thought, from the formation of Confucianism in the Warring States period to the confrontation between traditional thought and the imported ideologies of the twentieth centuries. In writing assignments, students may concentrate upon either Chinese or Japanese topics.

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Dist: TMV; WCult: NW. Major Dist: AALAC; <1700, <1800.

75. Colonialism, Development, and the Environment in Africa and Asia (Identical to Environmental Studies 45 and African and African American Studies 50)

13W: 10

This course examines the environmental history of Africa and Asia, focusing on the period of European colonialism and its aftermath. Topics include deforestation and desertification under colonial rule; imperialism and conservation; the consequences of environmental change for rural Africans and Asians; irrigation, big dams and transformations in water landscapes; the development of national parks and their impact on wildlife and humans; the environmentalism of the poor; urbanization and pollution; and global climate change in Africa and Asia.

Open to all students. Dist: INT or SOC; WCult: NW. Major Dist: AALAC.

76. The History of Modern India

12S: 10 13S: 12

This course examines the history of South Asia during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Themes of the course include the development of British imperialism, the impact of colonial rule on Indian rural society and economy, processes of cultural change, the development of nationalism, the historical role of Gandhi, the emergence of Hindu-Muslim conflict, and the character of post-colonial South Asia.

Open to all students. Dist: SOC; WCult: NW. Major Dist: AALAC. Haynes.

77. Imperialism in Modern East Asia

12S: 12 13S:10A

An examination of Western and Japanese imperialism in East Asia from the Opium War to the Pacific War. Subjects to be treated include the imposition of unequal treaties, the “scramble for concessions” in China, the creation of Japan’s formal and informal empires, and the rise and fall of the Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere.

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Dist: SOC or INT; WCult: NW. Major Dist: AALAC. Yeo.

79. Postwar Japan: From Occupied Nation to Economic Superpower

Not offered in the period rom 11F through 13S

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Dist: SOC; WCult: NW. Major Dist: AALAC.

81. From Coca to Cocaine: Drug Economies in Latin America (Identical to Latin American and Caribbean Studies 57)

13S: 12

The coca leaf has a sacred history in Andean culture, but coca’s relationship to cocaine production has also made this plant the centerpiece of international controversy. U.S. drug control policy has associated the cocaine trade with leftist movements and even terrorism. This course will explore the way in which drug production has affected Latin America’s political, cultural and economic life and shaped U.S. foreign policy toward the region.

Open to all classes. Dist: INT or SOC; WCult: NW; Major Dist: AALAC.

82. Popular Struggle, Political Change and U.S. Intervention in Central America

12W: 2 12F: 11

This course will explore the history of popular struggles, political change and U.S. intervention in Central America. The region’s rich and complex history has been marked both by repressive dictatorships and by struggles for national liberation, social justice and indigenous rights. We will look at the different factors that played a part in determining this history including commodity production, labor systems, U.S. foreign policy, race relations, liberation theology and revolution.

Open to all classes. Dist: SOC; WCult: NW. Major Dist: INTER. Vitz.

83. Twentieth-Century Latin America

11F: 10

This course seeks to address major issues in twentieth century Latin America through the history of three or four countries. Topics discussed will include development, imperialism, nationalism, revolution, state formation and violence.

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Dist: SOC; WCult: NW. Major Dist: AALAC. Vitz.

86. Slavery and Emancipation in Latin America and the Caribbean (Identical to, and described under, African and African-American Studies 83.3).

12W, 13S: 12

Dist: INT or SOC; WCult: NW. Goldthree.

87. Culture and Identity in Modern Mexico (Identical to Latin American and Caribbean Studies 76)

12W: 11 12F: 2

From the Porfiriato and the Revolution to the present, a survey of Mexican society and politics, with emphasis on the connections between economic developments, social justice, and political organization. Topics include fin de siècle modernization and the agrarian problem; causes and consequences of the Revolution of 1910; the making of the modern Mexican State; relations with the United States; industrialism and land reform; urbanization and migration; ethnicity, culture, and nationalism; neoliberalism and social inequality; the problems of political reform; and the zapatista rebellion in Chiapas.

Open to all classes. Dist: SOC; WCult: NW. Major Dist: AALAC. Vitz.

89. The Arab World in the Twentieth Century

Not offered in the period from 11F through 13S

Open to all classes. Dist: SOC; WCult: NW. Major Dist: AALAC.

INTERREGIONAL AND COMPARATIVE

The following courses fulfill the Department’s Interregional requirement. Full course descriptions may be found in the listing above.

4. The Crusades (12S: 12, 13S: 11)

5.8. Africa and the World (12S: 2A, 13W: 3B)

8.Body Parts, Body Wholes: An Introduction to the Comparative History of Medicine (12W: 11)

10. Colonial America (12S: 10A)

26. The Vietnam War (12S: 2)

31. Latinos in the United States: Origins and Histories (Not offered in the period from 11F through 13S)

32. Asians in the Americas to 1905 (13S: 10)

33. Asian America in the Twentieth Century (11S: 11, 12F: 12)

54. The Russian Empire (12S: 9)

57. Scientific Revolutions and Modern Society (12F: 12)

58. History of the Holocaust (Not offered in the period from 11F through 13S)

59. History of Warfare (12S: 11)

61. Britain and the Atlantic World, 1480-1780 (11F, 12F: 2A)

62. The First World War (13S: 9)

82. Popular Struggle, Political Change and U.S. Intervention in Central America (12W: 2, 12F: 2)

In addition, the following courses have an interregional or comparative focus.

94.1. War and Peace: A Global History

12S: 12 12F: 2

This course explores how the changing character of modern warfare, the collapse of empires, and globalization have enabled increasingly diverse and successful efforts to establish more peaceful relations between nations and among previously hostile groups within nations. The focus is on developments since 1890. Subjects covered include war and human nature, total war and nuclear weapons, disarmament and antiwar movements, international law, transitional justice, human rights, and the rising success rate of nonviolent revolutions.

Open to all classes. Dist: INT or TMV; WCult: W. Major Dist: INTER. Edsforth.

94.2. Science, Technology and Culture in the Nuclear Age

12W: 12

An examination of the social, political and cultural dimensions of nuclear technology from the discovery of fission in 1938 through the 1980s. We will consider how contexts and politics shaped the development of nuclear weapons and power reactors, and how these technologies in turn affected politics and culture. Topics include efforts in Germany, USA, USSR, Japan and England to build fission weapons during World War II; Hiroshima and Nagasaki in American and Japanese memory; the arms race, atomic scientists and the Cold War; the nuclear power industry in international comparison; living in and resisting the Nuclear Age; literary and film representations of the Nuclear Age; and the impact of the Nuclear Age on the development of science and technology since 1945.

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. WCult: W. Major Dist: INTER. Kremer.

94.3. Greek History: Archaic and Classical Greece (Identical to, and described under, Classical Studies 14)

13W: 12

Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: INTER; <1700, <1800.

94.4. Alexander the Great and the Macedonian Kings (Identical to, and described under, Classical Studies 15)

11F: 12

Dist: SOC or INT; WCult: W. Major Dist: INTER; <1700, <1800. Christesen.

94.5. Roman History: The Republic (Identical to, and described under, Classical Studies 17)

12F: 12

Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: INTER; <1700, <1800.

94.6. History of the Roman Empire: Roman Principate to Christian Empire (Identical to, and described under, Classical Studies 18)

12W: 12

Dist: INT or SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: INTER; <1700, <1800. Stewart.

94.7. Methods and Theory in Ancient History (Identical to, and described under, Classical Studies 19)

13W: 10A

Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: INTER; <1700, <1800.

94.8. History and Culture of the Jews: The Classical Period (Identical to, and described under, Jewish Studies 10)

Not offered in the period from 11F through 13S

Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: INTER; <1700, <1800.

94.9. History and Culture of the Jews: The Modern Period (Identical to, and described under, Jewish Studies 11)

13W: 2A

Dist: SOC; WCult: CI. Major Dist: INTER; <1800.

COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS

96. Open with written permission of the instructor to juniors and seniors. For details concerning individual seminars consult the Department. Section numbers follow the decimals.

96.1 Seminar: Personal Narratives in the Age of the American Revolution

11F: 2A. WCult: W. Major Dist: US & CAN. Cullon.

96.2 Seminar: Topics in Modern Japanese History

11F: Arr. Dist: SOC; WCult: NW. Major Dist: AALAC. Ericson.

96.3 Seminar: Native American History in the US West, 1500-1890

11F: 2A. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: US&CAN. Madley.

96.1 Seminar: Pen and Ink Witchcraft: Native American History Through Treaties (Identical to Native American Studies 81)

12W: 2A. Dist: INT or TMV; WCult: NW. Major Dist: US & CAN. Calloway.

96.2 Seminar: Topics in British History

12W: 2A. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: EUR. Estabrook.

96.3 Seminar: Research in Early Modern Europe

12W: 3A. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: EUR. Lagomarsino.

96.4 Seminar: American Civil War as Global Event

12W: 10A. WCult: W; Major Dist: US & CAN. Bonner.

96.5 Seminar: Asia, the Middle East and the Cold War (Identical to Asian and Middle Eastern Studies 91)

12W: 10A. WCult: NW; Major Dist: AALAC. Miller.

96.1 Seminar: Colonialism and Culture in Asia and Africa

12S: 3A. WCult: NW. Major Dist: AALAC. Haynes.

96.2 Seminar: Africa in the African-American Mind

12S: 2A. WCult: W. Major Dist: US & CAN. Rickford.

96.3 Seminar: Empires, Imperialism and the United States

12S: Arr. WCult: W; Major Dist: INTER. Miller.

96.1 Seminar: Personal Narratives in the Age of the American Revolution

12F: 2A. WCult: W. Major Dist: US & CAN.

96.2 Seminar: Napoleon and His Enemies

12F: 2A. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: EUR.

96.3 Colloquium: The Mongols

12F: 3A. Dist: SOC; WCult: NW. Major Dist: INTER.

96.1 Seminar: Topics in British History

13W: 2A. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: EUR.

96.2 Seminar: Topics in Medieval History

13W: 10A. Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Major Dist: EUR.

96.3 Seminar: Race, Ethnicity, Immigration and Empire: Asian Pacific American History

13W: 3A. WCult: W; Major Dist: US & CAN.

96.4 Seminar: Race, Ethnicity and Immigration in U.S. History

13W: 10A. WCult: W; Major Dist: US & CAN.

96.5 Seminar: Pen and Ink Witchcraft: Native American History Through Treaties (Identical to Native American Studies 81)

13W: 2A. Dist: INT or TMV; WCult: NW. Major Dist: US & CAN.

96.1 Seminar: American Civil War as Global Event

13S: 10A. WCult: W; Major Dist: US & CAN.

96.2 Seminar: Empires, Imperialism and the United States

13S: 2A. WCult: W; Major Dist: INTER.

96.3 Seminar: Topics in Modern Japanese History

13S: Arr. Dist: SOC; WCult: NW. Major Dist: AALAC.

96.4 Seminar: Latin American Rebels

13S: 3A. Dist: SOC; WCult: NW. Major Dist: AALAC.

INDEPENDENT STUDY AND HONORS

97. Independent Study

All terms: Arrange

This course offers an opportunity for a student to pursue some subject of special interest under the direction of a member of the Department through a specially designed program of readings and reports.

Open to qualified students with written permission of the instructor and the Chair.

11F, 12F: D.F.S.P. Independent Field Project

In consultation with members of the Dartmouth faculty, each student will design and carry out an independent project which makes use of London’s unique research opportunities. The project may relate to any aspect of British, European, and World History.

Prerequisite: membership in the Foreign Study Program. Bonner.

98. Honors Seminar

11F, 12F: 10A

The focus of the seminar is historiographic and great emphasis will be placed on the skills needed to write a research thesis in History. Only students enrolled in the Honors Program may take History 98; permission of the instructor. This course does not fulfill the requirement of a culminating experience in the Major and it may be taken only once. Orleck.

99. Thesis

12W, 12S, 13W, 13S: Arrange

This course involves an extensive investigation of some topic and submission of a bound undergraduate thesis by the designated deadline. Only students enrolled in the Honors Program may take History 99; permission of the thesis advisor and the Chair.