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Chemistry

2. Quantitative Reasoning in Chemistry

11F, 12F: 10

A course for students who intend to take Chemistry 5-6, but who need additional preparation for quantitative and analytical aspects of general chemistry. Chemistry 2 develops the quantitative basis of chemistry relationships and the skills to solve chemistry problems. Much of the course will be devoted to mathematical manipulations and functional relationships that are integral to the quantitative applications of chemistry concepts. In-class experiments will introduce the analysis, interpretation and presentation of chemical data. Students are placed into Chemistry 2 based on their pre-matriculation mathematics and science record. Dist: SCI.

5-6. General Chemistry

5. 11F: 10 12W: 9L, 10 12F: 10 13W: 9L, 10; Laboratory: Arrange

6. 11F: 9L 12S: 9L, 10 12F: 9L 13S: 9L, 10; Laboratory: Arrange

An introduction to the fundamental principles of chemistry, including chemical stoichi-ometry; the properties of gases, liquids, and solids; solutions; chemical equilibria; atomic and molecular structure; an introduction to thermodynamics; reaction kinetics; and a dis-cussion of the chemical properties of selected elements. The laboratory work emphasizes physical-chemical measurements, quantitative analysis, and synthesis.

An outline of topics for review of secondary school background in preparation for college general chemistry is available from the Department of Chemistry.

Students who are eligible to receive advanced placement credit for Chemistry 5-6 may not enroll in Chemistry 5-6 or Chemistry 10 for credit without permission of the Depart-ment. Advanced placement credit for Chemistry 5-6 will be withdrawn for students who subsequently enroll in Chemistry 5-6 or Chemistry 10. Students with credit for Biology/Chemistry 9 may not enroll in Chemistry 5.

Prerequisite for Chemistry 5: Mathematics 3, or Mathematics 1 and 2, or Mathematics 1 and Chemistry 2. (First year students taking Mathematics 1 will be placed in Chemistry 2). Prerequisite for Chemistry 6: Mathematics 3 (or Mathematics 1 and 2) and Chemistry 5 or Biology/Chemistry 9.

Supplemental course fee required. Dist: SLA.

7. First-Year Seminars in Chemistry

Consult special listings

8-9. Chemical Principles and Biological Processes I &II (Identical to Biology 8-9)

8. 11F, 12F: 10A; Laboratory: Arrange

9. 12W, 13W: 10A; Laboratory: Arrange

This two-term course will cover principles and processes of general chemistry as applied to biochemistry and cell biology. Over the course of two terms, students will receive an introduction to the fundamental principles of chemistry (matter, elements, atoms, equilibria, acids and bases, enthalpy, thermochemistry, entropy, free energy, redox reactions, and electrochemistry) in the context of fundamental biological processes and systems (biopolymer structure, protein folding and denaturation, membranes and transport, receptor/ligand binding, metabolism and energy production). Upon completion of both Chemistry 8 and 9, students will have fulfilled the prerequisites necessary for entry into Chemistry 6 and any of the foundation level courses in Biology (Biology 12-16). Successful completion of only the first term (Biology/Chemistry 8) will result in a SCI distributive credit but will not fulfill any prerequisite requirements.

Biology 8 and 9 are the same as Chemistry 8 and 9. For simplicity, and for clarity with respect to medical school applications, upon completion of this two-term sequence the student transcript will show Biology 8 and Chemistry 9, regardless of how students elected these courses at the time of registration.

Enrollment is limited to 80 students. Dist: Biology/Chemistry 8, SCI; Biology/Chemistry 9, SLA

Students who have received credit for Chemistry 5 taken at Dartmouth, or received transfer credit for Chemistry 5, may not enroll in Biology/Chemistry 8. Students who have received pre-matriculation credit for Chemistry 5 may not enroll in Biology/Chemistry 8 without permission of the Chemistry Department. Pre-matriculation credit for Chemistry 5 will be withdrawn for students who subsequently enroll in Biology/Chemistry 8. Students who receive credit for Biology/Chemistry 9 may not subsequently enroll in Chemistry 5.

Pre-health students who complete Biology/Chemistry 8-9 will have fulfilled the following with respect to the pre-health requirements: one term of general chemistry with lab, and one term of general biology without lab.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 3, or Mathematics 1 and 2, or Mathematics 1 and Chemistry 2. (First year students taking Mathematics 1 will be placed in Chemistry 2); Mathematics 3 may be elected concurrently with Biology/Chemistry 8; however, Mathematics 3 as well as Biology/Chemistry 8 must be completed with a passing grade before enrolling in Chemistry 9. Kull, Sloboda.

10. Honors First-Year General Chemistry

11F, 12F: 10; Laboratory M or Tu 2:00-6:00 p.m.

Chemistry 10 is a general chemistry course for students with a strong background in chemistry and mathematics who may have an interest in majoring in the sciences. The course will cover selected general chemistry topics important for higher level chemistry courses. These include thermodynamics, reaction kinetics, quantum mechanics, and bonding. Laboratory work will emphasize physico-chemical measurements and quantitative analysis.

Chemistry 10 is open only to first-year students and enrollment is limited. Admission is by satisfactory performance on a general chemistry proficiency test given during Orienta-tion. Adequate mathematics preparation, equivalent to Mathematics 3, is also required. Chemistry 10 is offered in the fall term and is the prerequisite equivalent to Chemistry 5/6. Students who successfully complete Chemistry 10 will also be granted credit for Chemistry 5, if they have not already been granted such credit.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory performance on the general chemistry proficiency test and credit for Mathematics 3 or equivalent. Supplemental course fee required. Dist: SLA.

41. Biological Chemistry I

12S, 13S: 12; Laboratory M, Tu, W or Th 2:00-6:00 p.m.

This course is a one-term introduction to biochemistry presented from a chemical per-spective. This course is intended for chemistry majors and will be divided into three sec-tions, using specific examples to demonstrate and stress the role and integration of organic, inorganic and physical chemistry as applied to biochemical processes. Laboratories cover chemical methods applied to biological chemistry problems.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 52 or Chemistry 58, or permission of the instructor. Students with major credit for Biology 40 are not eligible to receive credit for Chemistry 41. Supplemental course fee required. Dist: SLA.

42. Biological Chemistry II

11F, 12F: 11; Laboratory M or Tu 2:00-6:00 p.m.

A one term advanced course with in-depth treatment of a number of important concepts in modern biological chemistry, including structural biology (both theoretical and experimental methods), protein folding, ligand binding, allostery, enzyme kinetics, and an introduction to molecular modeling and chemoinformatics. Laboratories will entail application of these methods/techniques.

Prerequisites: Chemistry 41 or permission of the instructor. Supplemental course fee required. Dist: SLA.

51-52. Organic Chemistry

51. 11F, 12S, 12F, 13S: 11; Laboratory Tu,W or Th 2:00-8:00 p.m.

52. 12W, 12X, 13W: 11; Laboratory Tu,W or Th 2:00-8:00 p.m.

A two-term introduction to the chemistry of carbon compounds. The lectures deal with the preparation, properties, and reactions of most of the important classes of organic com-pounds. There is considerable emphasis upon reaction mechanisms and some attention is given to naturally occurring substances of biological importance.

The laboratory work will introduce the student to experimental techniques and instru-mental methods including several types of chromatography and spectroscopy, organic synthesis, and the systematic identification of organic compounds.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 6 (or 10). Chemistry 51 (or 57 with permission of instructor) is a prerequisite to 52. Supplemental course fee required. Dist: SLA.

57-58. Honors Organic Chemistry

57. 11F, 12F: 11; Laboratory: M 2:00-8:00 p.m.

58. 12W, 13W: 11; Laboratory: M 2:00-8:00 p.m.

A two-term introduction to the chemistry of carbon compounds intended for students planning a chemistry major or career of research in a chemically-related science, including medical science. The lectures deal with the preparation, properties, and reactions of most of the important classes of organic compounds. There is considerable emphasis on reaction mechanisms and some attention is given to naturally occurring substances of biological importance. Topics are covered in greater depth, both in lecture and in the textbook, than in the 51-52 sequence.

The laboratory work introduces the student to experimental techniques and instrumental methods including several types of chromatographic and spectroscopy techniques, organic synthesis, and identification of organic compounds.. Enrollment in Chemistry 57-58 is limited.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and either a grade of at least B+ in Chemistry 6 (or B in Chemistry 10) or a passing score on the Chemistry 6 credit test is required for Chemistry 57. Chemistry 57 (or 51 with permission of instructor) is a prerequisite to 58. Supplemental course fee required. Dist: SLA.

63. Environmental Chemistry

12X: 9L; Laboratory M, Tu, W, Th or F 2:00-6:00

A study of the chemistry of current environmental problems and potential solutions. The course will deal with such topics as atmospheric chemistry, chemicals and cancer, and the chemistry of resource management. A few laboratory experiments emphasizing modern methods of instrumental analysis for substances in the environment will be included in the course.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 51 or 57, or permission of the instructor. Supplemental course fee required. Dist: TLA.

64. Basic Inorganic Chemistry

12W, 13W: 9L; Laboratory Th or F 2:00-6:00

A study of bonding, structure, physical and chemical properties, and chemical reactions of inorganic compounds. Examples will be drawn from main group and transition metal compounds.

The laboratory will involve preparations of inorganic compounds which illustrate appropriate experimental techniques for syntheses and manipulations, and instrumental methods for characterization of inorganic compounds.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 51 or 57, or permission of the instructor. Supplemental course fee required. Dist: SLA.

67. Physical Biochemistry I

12W, 13W: 11; Laboratory W 2:00-6:00

Chemistry 67 covers the structural and chemical properties of proteins and nucleic acids, including ligand binding, enzymatic catalysis, the structural basis and functional significance of protein-nucleic acid recognition, and protein folding. The course also covers the application of physical and spectroscopic techniques, including X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance, microscopy, fluorescence and circular dichroism, to the study of biological macromolecules. The laboratory introduces these experimental methods in the study of proteins.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 41, Chemistry 76, and Chemistry 52 or 58, or permission of the instructor. Supplemental course fee required. Dist: SLA.

75. Physical Chemistry I

12W, 13W: 11; Laboratory M or Th 2:00-6:00

An examination of the laws of classical thermodynamics, followed by applications to the properties of gases, liquids, and solids, as well as to solutions, phase, and chemical equilibria. Chemical reaction thermodynamics and the kinetic theory of gases at equilibrium. An introduction to statistical thermodynamics, phenomenological transport and electrochemical reactions are discussed. Laboratories cover physical chemistry techniques drawn from these areas.

Prerequisites: Chemistry 6 (or 10) and Physics 13 (or 15, or Physics 3 and 4) and Mathematics 8, or permission of the instructor. Supplemental course fee required. Dist: SLA.

76. Physical Chemistry II

12S, 13S: 11; Laboratory M or Tu 2:00-6:00

Topics in chemical reaction kinetics and the application of quantum mechanics to chemical bonding and spectroscopy. The examination of the fundamental ideas of quantum mechanics and their application to simple model systems such as the linear harmonic oscillator and a confined particle, and to atomic and molecular structure. Application of quantum theory to electronic, vibrational, rotational, and magnetic resonance spectroscopies. Laboratories cover physical chemistry techniques drawn from these areas.

Prerequisites: Chemistry 75 and Chemistry 64, or permission of the instructor. Supplemental course fee required. Dist: SLA.

87. Undergraduate Investigation in Chemistry

All terms: Arrange

An original and individual investigation with associated literature study in one of the fields of chemistry under the supervision of a member of the staff. Students electing the course will carry out preliminary reading during the preceding term and normally partic-ipate in a weekly colloquium. Open to qualified majors and minors, normally seniors, with permission of the Chair. The course may be elected more than once, but may be counted only once in satisfying the minimum major requirements. It may be elected for the last term in residence only if elected previously, or if the student has been doing research outside of this course.

Students electing the course write a report and take an oral examination at the end of the term in which they last elect the course.

Prerequisite: sufficient training in the area of chemistry to be investigated, and permis-sion of the Chair. Chair and staff of the Department.

90. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry: Organometallic Chemistry (Identical to Chemistry 130)

13S: 10 Offered in alternate years

A study of the structure, bonding, and chemical properties of organometallic compounds of the main group and transition elements. Applications to organic synthesis and homogeneous catalysis will be discussed, and organometallic compounds of the lanthanide and actinide elements may also be discussed.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 64, or permission of the instructor. Dist: SCI.

91. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry: Catalysis (Identical to Chemistry 131)

11F: 10 Offered in alternate years

The role of metals in homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, with an emphasis on mechanisms of catalytic reactions. Applications to industrial processes, organic synthesis, and asymmetric synthesis will be discussed.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 64, and either Chemistry 52 or Chemistry 58, or permission of the instructor. Dist: SCI.

92. Inorganic Biochemistry (Identical to Chemistry 132 and Biochemistry 132)

12S: 10 Offered in alternate years

The role of metal ions in biological systems. Topics include metal ion transport, storage, and interaction with proteins and nucleic acids; metalloproteins involved in oxygen trans-port and electron transfer; metalloenzymes involved in activation of oxygen and other substrates; and medicinal, toxicity, and carcinogenicity aspects of metals; as well as inorganic model chemistry of bioinorganic systems. Several physical methods are introduced, and their application to current research on the above topics is considered.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 64, and Chemistry 41 or Biology 40, or permission of the instructor. Dist: SCI.

93. Physical Organic Chemistry (Identical to Chemistry 151)

11F: 9L Offered in alternate years

Modern theories of organic reaction mechanisms, particularly the use of physical-chemical principles to predict the effect of changing reaction variables, especially reactant structures, on reactivity. The structure, stability, and reactivity of carbanions and carbocations, as well as SN1 and SN2 reactions, are discussed.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 52 or 58, or permission of the instructor. Dist: SCI.

96. Special Topics in Physical Chemistry (Identical to Chemistry 101)

11F, 12F, 13W: Arrange

An in-depth exploration of a specific topic in physical chemistry. This course provides an introduction into the areas of current research in the field. The course is offered every Fall and Winter term, but the content changes according to the chosen topic.

96.1 Quantum Chemistry (Formerly Chemistry 102)

96.2 Statistical Thermodynamics (Formerly Chemistry 105)

96.3 Molecular Spectroscopy (Formerly Chemistry 106)

96.4 Chemistry of Macromolecules (Formerly Chemistry 108)

96.7 Introduction to Materials Chemistry

96.8 Chemical Kinetics (Formerly Chemistry 107)

96.1 Quantum Chemistry (Identical to Chemistry 101.1)

An introduction to the quantum mechanics of molecular systems. Approximate methods for calculating the electronic structure of molecules are discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on molecular orbital methods at the empirical, semi-empirical, and ab-initio levels. Evaluation of such methods for studies of molecular geometry, conformational problems, thermochemical data, and spectroscopic parameters is presented. Other topics considered include the electronic structure of hydrogen bonded systems and of excited states. Methods which include the effects of electron correlation are briefly outlined.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 76 or equivalent, or permission of the instructor. Dist: SCI. Ditchfield.

96.2 Statistical Thermodynamics (Identical to Chemistry 101.2)

Elements of equilibrium statistical thermodynamics for classical and quantum mechanical systems, with applications to ideal gases, crystalline solids, imperfect gases and liquids.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 76 or equivalent or permission of instructor. Dist: SCI. Cantor.

96.3 Molecular Spectroscopy (Identical to Chemistry 101.3)

A study of optical spectroscopy including selected topics from amongst point group theory, vibrational spectra of polyatomic molecules, electronic and vibronic spectra of molecules and rotational spectra. May be offered on tutorial basis.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 76 or equivalent, or permission of the instructor. Dist: SCI. Winn.

96.4 Chemistry of Macromolecules: Physical Properties and Characterization (Identical to Chemistry 101.4)

11F: 12

Light scattering and other characterization techniques; thermodynamic and transport properties of macromolecular solutions. Structure-property correlations in amorphous and crystalline polymers.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 75 or permission of the instructor. Dist: SCI. Lipson.

96.7 Introduction to Materials Chemistry (Identical to Chemistry 101.7)

This course begins with a review of fundamental concepts in material science, provides an introduction to some of the more advanced concepts, especially in regard to nanomaterials and, finally, focuses on the chemistry involved both in production of modern materials and their uses. The latter topics include the chemistry of thin films, self-assembled chemical systems, surface chemistry and cluster chemistry.

Prerequisite: Background in Chemistry equivalent to Chemistry 76 or Physics equivalent to Physics 24 or Engineering equivalent to Engineering 24 or permission of instructor. Dist: SCI. BelBruno.

96.8 Chemical Kinetics (Identical to Chemistry 101.8)

Kinetics of chemical reactions in various media: reaction rate expressions, mechanisms, elementary processes. Elementary theories of rate processes: activated complex theory, elementary collision theory, unimolecular decomposition. Such topics as diffusion control of reactions, catalysis and photochemistry will be treated as time allows.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 76 or equivalent or permission of the instructor. Dist: SCI. BelBruno.

101. Special Topics in Physical Chemistry (Identical to Chemistry 96)

11F, 12F, 13W: Arrange

An in-depth exploration of a specific topic in physical chemistry. This course provides an introduction into the areas of current research in the field. The course is offered every Fall and Winter term, but the content changes according to the chosen topic. For course descriptions, see Chemistry 96.

101.1 Quantum Chemistry (Formerly Chemistry 102)

101.2 Statistical Thermodynamics (Formerly Chemistry 105)

101.3 Molecular Spectroscopy (Formerly Chemistry 106)

101.4 Chemistry of Macromolecules (Formerly Chemistry 108)

101.7 Introduction to Materials Chemistry

101.8 Chemical Kinetics (Formerly Chemistry 107)

123. Graduate Toxicology (Identical to Pharmacology and Toxicology 123)

12W: Arrange Offered in alternate years

This course is open to graduate, medical and advanced undergraduate students. It pro-vides an introduction to toxicology as a discipline, with a focus on the molecular basis for toxicity of chemicals in biological systems. Major topics include: principles of cell and molecular toxicology, xenobiotic metabolism, molecular targets of cellular toxicity, genetic toxicology, chemical carcinogenesis, immunotoxicology, neurotoxicology, clinical toxicology, and quantitative risk assessment.

Faculty lectures and discussion.

Prerequisite: Undergraduate or graduate biochemistry, or permission of instructor.

124. Analytical Chemistry and Inorganic Instrumental Analysis (Identical to Earth Sciences 124)

13S: Arrange

This course is directed towards graduate students planning to use inorganic chemical analysis in their thesis work. The lectures and seminars focus on the theory and application of modern instrumental analysis and analytical chemistry. The theoretical background for a number of inorganic instrumental analytical methods are given and examples of their application to problems of interest to analytical chemists working in the fields of earth science, chemistry, biology and environmental science are presented. The lectures cover ion chromatography, electrochemistry, atomic absorption, inductively coupled plasma optical emission and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The theory and concepts of analytical chemistry are provided along with statistical tools, uncertainty calculations and data treatment methods useful in analytical chemistry. Taylor.

Prerequisites: Chemistry 5 and Chemistry 6 or equivalents or permission of the instructor.

130. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry: Organometallic Chemistry (Identical to Chemistry 90)

13S: 10 Offered in alternate years

A study of the structure, bonding, and chemical properties of organometallic compounds of the main group and transition elements. Applications to organic synthesis and homogeneous catalysis will be discussed, and organometallic compounds of the lanthanide and actinide elements may also be discussed.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 64, or permission of the instructor.

131. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry: Catalysis (Identical to, and described under, Chemistry 91)

11F: 10 Offered in alternate years

Prerequisite: Chemistry 64, and either Chemistry 52 or Chemistry 58, or permission of the instructor.

132. Inorganic Biochemistry (Identical to, and described under, Chemistry 92; also Biochemistry 132)

12S: 10 Offered in alternate years

Prerequisite: Chemistry 64, and Chemistry 41 or Biology 40, or permission of the instructor.

137. Methods of Materials Characterization (Identical to Physics 128 and described under Engineering Sciences 137)

12S: 2A

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 24, or permission of the instructor. I. Baker.

140. Chemistry Research Colloquia

All but summer terms: W 4:00-5:00 p.m., Th 10:30-noon

Colloquia presented to the Department of Chemistry by scientists and educators in the chemistry profession on Thursdays, and by graduate students and others conducting research in chemistry and allied fields on Wednesdays as needed. The course is required of all graduate students in chemistry in each term except summer. The course is not open for credit to undergraduates. The staff.

151. Physical Organic Chemistry (Identical to, and described under, Chemistry 93)

11F: 9L Offered in alternate years

Prerequisite: Chemistry 52 or 58, or permission of the instructor.

152. Advanced Organic Synthesis and Mechanisms

13W: Arrange

Consideration of organic chemical reactions at an advanced level. Current knowledge concerning synthetic methods, reaction mechanisms, reactive intermediates, conformational analysis, and biosynthesis is discussed in the context of modern organic chemistry.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 151, or permission of the instructor.

153. Chemistry of Natural Products

13S: Arrange

A survey of the application of modern synthetic methods to the total synthesis of natural products. Coverage will include retrosynthetic analysis and synthetic planning and an over-view of the preparation of a wide variety of important natural products. Emphasis will be placed on student problem-solving in the context of the synthesis of complex molecules.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 152, or permission of the instructor.

157. Topics in Advanced Organic Chemistry

12W: Arrange

Treatment at an advanced level of one or more areas of organic chemistry. The subject matter may vary from offering to offering; accordingly, the course may be taken for credit more than once.

Offered on a tutorial basis to qualified students.

159. Chemistry of Heterocyclic Compounds

12S: Arrange

An introduction to the chemical, physical, and spectroscopic properties of heterocyclic compounds. Coverage will include reactions, synthesis, stereochemistry, and unusual rearrangements. Attention will also be given to natural product synthesis and to heterocycles of biological interest.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

161. Topics in Advanced Biophysical Chemistry

Treatment at an advanced level of one or more areas of biophysical chemistry. The sub-ject matter varies from offering to offering; accordingly the course may be taken for credit more than once.

161.1, Membrane Biophysics. The structure and function of cell membranes, with emphasis on the complex behavior of intrinsic membrane proteins and its relation to physical properties of the lipid bilayer.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 41 and Chemistry 42 or 67, or permission of the instructor. Dist: SCI. Cantor, Mierke.

161.2, Biomolecular Simulations. An advanced treatment of modern computational approaches to the folding, structure, and dynamics of proteins and nucleic acids and their complexes. Topics include folding, searching algorithms, homology modeling, energy landscape deformation, and multi-dimensional searching. Dist: SCI.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 41 and Chemistry 42 or 67, or permission of the instructor. Cantor and Mierke.

161.3, Biomolecular NMR.

12S: Arrange

The theoretical and practical aspects of the modern use of nuclear magnetic resonance in the study of biomolecules including peptides/proteins, synthetic and natural products, and nucleic acids will be developed. Mierke.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 41 and Chemistry 42 or 67, or permission of the instructor. Dist: SCI.

161.4, Structure and Dynamics of Biomolecules.The theoretical and practical aspects for the determination of the structure and dynamics of proteins, and nucleic acids will be developed. Particular emphasis will be placed on the utilization of X-ray diffraction, cryo-electron microscopy, and high-resolution NMR and the computational approaches associated with them. Dist: SCI.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 41 and Chemistry 42 or 67, or permission of the instructor. Mierke.

161.5, Protein Crystallography. Theoretical aspects for the determination of protein structures using X-ray crystallography. Topics will include a detailed description of crystal symmetry, diffraction theory, data collection and processing, and methods for solving the crystallographic phase problem. Dist: SCI.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 41 and Chemistry 42 or 67, or permission of the instructor. Kull.

256. Graduate Instruction in Teaching

11F, 12F: Arrange

A course in the methodology and practice of chemistry teaching at the undergraduate college level. Topics such as laboratory supervision and safety, grading issues, special needs students, lecturing and tutoring techniques, exam preparation, and the teacher/student relationship will be discussed through readings, class discussions, and student presentations. This course is a prerequisite to the supervised undergraduate teaching requirement for the Ph.D. degree in chemistry.

Required of entering graduate students. This course is not open for credit to undergraduates. Milde, Welder.

257. Supervised Undergraduate Teaching in Chemistry

All terms: Arrange

Teaching in chemistry undergraduate courses under the supervision of a faculty member. Normally students enrolled in this course teach alongside faculty in undergraduate instructional laboratories. This course is open only to graduate students; it may be elected for credit more than once.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 256 or previous teaching experience in undergraduate chemistry courses. Chair and staff of the Department.

260-264. Graduate Research Colloquium in Chemistry

All but summer terms: Arrange

This course is available to graduate students during each term of residence, except for the summer term. An essential element of scientific training is in the critical analysis and communication of experimental research in an oral format. Evaluation will be based on quality of the work, quality of critical analysis, and on presentation style, including effective use of audiovisual materials. All enrolled students will make oral presentations that describe work from the current literature or their own research. Normally these series meet weekly. This course is not open to registration by undergraduates. The staff.

Chemistry 260, Organometallic Chemistry

Chemistry 261, Materials Chemistry

Chemistry 262, Synthetic Organic Chemistry

Chemistry 263, Bioinorganic Chemistry

Chemistry 264, Biophysical Chemistry

297. Graduate Investigation in Chemistry A

All terms: Arrange

An original and individual experimental or theoretical investigation beyond the under-graduate level in one of the fields of chemistry. This course is open only to graduate stu-dents; it may be elected for credit more than once. This course carries one course credit and should be elected by students conducting research and also electing two or more other graduate or undergraduate courses. Chair and staff of the Department.

298. Graduate Investigation in Chemistry B

All terms: Arrange

An original and individual experimental or theoretical investigation beyond the under-graduate level in one of the fields of chemistry. This course is open only to graduate stu-dents; it may be elected for credit more than once. This course carries two course credits and should be elected by students electing only departmental colloquia in addition to research. Chair and staff of the Department.

299. Graduate Investigation in Chemistry C

All terms: Arrange

An original and individual experimental or theoretical investigation beyond the under-graduate level in one of the fields of chemistry. This course is open only to graduate stu-dents; it may be elected for credit more than once. This course carries three course credits and should be elected by students conducting research exclusively in any one term. Chair and staff of the Department.