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Chemistry

Chair: Peter A. Jacobi

Professors J. J. BelBruno, R. S. Cantor, R. Ditchfield, D. S. Glueck, G. W. Gribble, R. P. Hughes, P. A. Jacobi, J. E. G. Lipson, D. F. Mierke, D. E. Wilcox, J. S. Winn; Associate Professor F. J. Kull; Assistant Professors I. Aprahamian, E. V. Pletneva, J. Wu; Senior Lecturers S. P. Milde, C. O. Welder; Adjunct Professors T. U. Gerngross, U. J. Gibson, D. R. Madden, R. A. Naumann, H. M. Swartz; Adjunct Assistant Professor M. R. Spaller, Adjunct Research Assistant Professor B. P. Jackson; Research Professors D. M. Lemal, T. A. Spencer; Research Assistant Professors M. Pellegrini, A. A. Pletnev

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE CHEMISTRY MAJOR

The Chemistry Department offers four major programs. All major programs require an average GPA of 2.0 in all courses counted toward the major, including prerequisites taken in Chemistry. Normally, all courses that would serve as prerequisites to, or count toward a major in Chemistry, and that are presented at the time the student submits a major card must individually have a GPA of 2.0 or higher. Three of the major programs are offered as majors in chemistry: Plan A, for those who wish a broad and thorough training in chemistry; Plan B, for those whose scientific interests are only partially based in chemistry; and a modified major, which is similar to Plan B, but also includes a second program involving another college department.

Plan A should be chosen by students who plan to do graduate work in chemistry or a closely allied science. Such students should normally add further courses in chemistry, physics, and mathematics to the plan’s minimum requirements. Plan A is also a suitable choice for premedical students.

Plan B is less structured and is suitable for students planning to engage in chemically-related careers, such as medicine, environmental science, life science, or industrial science, or professions for which the study of chemistry may prove desirable, such as teaching, law, or business.

The fourth program offered by the Chemistry Department is a major in biophysical chemistry. This is a relatively structured major designed for students interested in biological chemistry and chemical methods for studying life processes. It provides a strong background for graduate work in biophysical chemistry, structural biology, biochemistry, and biomedical science, and is suitable for premedical students. Students are encouraged to add further courses in chemistry, biochemistry, biological sciences, mathematics, and physics to the plan’s minimum requirements.

Dartmouth College requires that all majors must complete a substantial, graded culminating or integrating activity in their major. Many chemistry majors will satisfy this requirement by participating in undergraduate research by registering for one or more terms of Chemistry 87, Undergraduate Investigation in Chemistry. Often such students will be enrolled in the Chemistry Honors Program as well.

Other chemistry majors will satisfy the requirement for a culminating or inte-grating experience by including in their major programs one of the three-course groups listed below. The course groups, each of which provides an integrated presentation of an important area of modern chemical sciences, are: Biophysical Chemistry Chemistry 75, 76 and 67; Biological Chemistry Chemistry 41, 42 and 161; Physical Chemistry Chemistry 75, 76 and 96; Chemical Applications, Synthesis and Characterization Chemistry 63, 64, and one additional course from among Chemistry 90, 91, 92, 93.

Students must indicate their preliminary plans for satisfying the requirement for the culminating or integrating experience by the time they enroll in the major and submit their major cards. They must confirm their plans at the beginning of the fall term of the senior year. Modified majors with Chemistry as the primary department must define a culminating or integrating experience as part of the coherent and unified whole of their modified major, and must file a written statement with the Department’s Undergraduate Advisory Committee and with the Registrar, explaining their rationale for the courses selected for the modified major.

The computation of the average in the major will be based upon all courses that are eligible to be counted toward the major.

1. PLAN A MAJOR

Prerequisite: Chemistry 5-6, or 9-6, or 10; Mathematics 3, 8, and 13 (or equivalents); and Physics 13-14 (strongly recommended) or 3-4 or 15-16.

Required Courses: Chemistry 51 or 57, 52 or 58, 64, 75, 76 and 96.

Two additional courses selected from among Chemistry 41, 42, 63, 67, 87, 90, 91, 92, 93 and 96; graduate-level courses in Chemistry; Physics 19; Biology 40; Mathematics 20, 22 or 24, 23, and 46; and, with prior written permission, rel-evant major credit (or graduate-level) courses in other departments in the Division of the Sciences. Chemistry 41 cannot be taken in conjunction with Biology 40.

2. PLAN B MAJOR

Prerequisite: Chemistry 5-6, or 9-6, or 10; Mathematics 3 and 8 (or equivalent); and Physics 13-14 (strongly recommended) or 3-4 or 15-16.

Required Courses: Of the eight courses, a minimum of six must be in chemistry to include a) Chemistry 51 or 57, 75 and 76, and 64; b) two additional courses from the following group: Chemistry 41, 42, 52 or 58, 63, 67, 87, 90, 91, 92, 93, 96 and graduate-level courses in chemistry. Note that Chemistry 76 is a pre-requisite to Chemistry 96.

The remaining two courses may be additional chemistry courses from group b) above or may be chosen from the following: Physics 19; Biology 40; Mathematics 20, 22 or 24, 23 and 46; and, with prior written permission, relevant major credit (or graduate-level) courses in other departments in the Division of the Sciences. Chemistry 41 cannot be taken in conjunction with Biology 40.

3. MODIFIED MAJOR

Modified Major with Chemistry as the primary department

Prerequisite: As required by courses elected.

Required Courses: Six in total, which must include Chemistry 51 or 57, 64, and 75. The other three courses must be Chemistry Department courses. Chemistry 41 cannot be taken in conjunction with Biology 40.

Four additional courses from the secondary department selected with the approval of any member of the Undergraduate Advisory Committee (and under certain circumstances by the secondary department; see the Regulations under Department Major).

Modified Major with Chemistry as the secondary department

Prerequisite: As required by courses elected.

Required Courses: Four courses, which must be chemistry offerings, suitable (beyond prerequisites to the major) for completion of the Plan A or Plan B major.

4. BIOPHYSICAL CHEMISTRY MAJOR

Prerequisite: Chemistry 5-6, or 9-6, or 10; Mathematics 3 and 8 (or equivalent); Physics 13-14 (strongly recommended) or 3-4 or 15-16. (Biology 12 and 13 are recommended but not required.)

Required Courses: Chemistry 41, 51 or 57, 52 or 58, 75, 76, 64, and 67.

One additional course selected from among Chemistry 42, 63, 87, 90, 91, 92, 93 or 96; graduate-level courses in chemistry; Engineering Sciences 35; Math-ematics 20, 22 or 24, 23, or 46; Physics 19; and with prior written permission, relevant major credit (or graduate-level) courses in other departments in the Division of the Sciences.

There are many different ways in which one can complete a major in Chemistry. In order to better inform your decision, the department has prepared a handout showing various paths students can take through the major; not only does this emphasize that the major is more flexible than it might appear at first glance, but also it shows that there are several major plans that do not require taking two major courses in a term. This document is available at

http://www.dartmouth.edu/~chem/docs/chemmajorplanning.pdf.

Students considering a Chemistry Department major are strongly encouraged to take Chemistry 5-6 (or 9-6, or 10) in their first year. Students with advanced placement in English, foreign language, or chemistry are urged to consider taking Physics 13-14 during the first year. This is also advisable for those students who delay completion of the language requirement until sophomore year in Language Study Abroad. Students who plan to participate in Language Study Abroad should give early attention to the need for careful curriculum planning. In some cases it may be advisable to postpone the LSA term to the fall term of the junior year. If so, it is necessary to obtain (routine) approval from the Registrar for deferral of completion of the Language requirement.

All Chemistry Department majors have required courses, some of which must be taken in a particular order. While many sequences are possible, and the Department’s Undergraduate Advisory Committee is happy to give advice on this, it is essential to complete prerequisite courses before taking certain major courses. As a general guideline, it is recommended for majors that the physics and mathematics prerequisites for Chemistry 75 and Chemistry 76, as well as Chemistry 51 or 57, be completed by the end of the sophomore spring term. Specifically, majors must complete Physics 13 (or 15, or 3 and 4) and Mathematics 8 before they take Chemistry 75. Any changes of courses from those listed on the major card filed with the Department must be approved in writing by a departmental adviser before the course is taken for credit.

Many Chemistry Department majors do research projects. This research is usually done during the senior (and sometimes junior) year and often for credit (see Chemistry 87), though occasionally a stipend is available to allow a student to do full-time research during a leave term. All majors are urged to investigate the numerous possible research projects offered by chemistry faculty members. A brochure describing faculty research interests and the Chemistry 87 application form are available at http://www.dartmouth.edu/~chem and from the Department staff (102 Burke). The brochure enables a student to identify research areas of particular interest. A final choice of research project is made after consultation with the faculty member(s) concerned. The completed application form is submitted to the Chair for approval.

Certification as a public school Chemistry teacher is available through partnership with the Education Department. Contact the Education Department for details about course requirements.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE CHEMISTRY MINOR

The Chemistry Department offers a single minor program. Any student wishing to enroll in the minor program must submit a minor card signed by a member of the Chemistry Department’s Undergraduate Advisory Committee no later than the day before final examinations begin in fall term of senior year.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 5-6, or 9-6, or 10 and Mathematics 3

Required Courses: Chemistry 51 or 57 and 64

Two additional courses selected from among Chemistry 41, 42, 52 or 58, 63, 75, 76, 87, 90, 91, 92, and 93; or graduate-level courses in chemistry. The NRO option is disallowed for any required course taken to fulfill the chemistry minor. Students should note that many of the courses listed above have prerequisites in addition to Chemistry 6 and Mathematics 3.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MATERIALS SCIENCE MINOR

The minor in Materials Science is sponsored by faculty in Chemistry, Physics and Engineering with an interest in interdisciplinary education and research in materials science.

CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT HONORS PROGRAM

A student whose grades meet the minimum College requirement for honors work may apply to be admitted to the Honors Program. An honors major follows the basic pattern outlined in the requirements for the chemistry major but is very strongly urged to elect additional courses in chemistry and allied sciences.

An honors student carries out one of two individual projects. Usually an original experimental or theoretical investigation is undertaken in a well-defined area of interest under the guidance and supervision of a member of the faculty. A student with a strong interest in teaching may, however, formulate and carry out under the direction of a member of the faculty a program combining the development of instructional materials with actual experience in classroom or laboratory teaching. In either case, on completion of the work the student will write a thesis and take an oral examination.

A student electing an original experimental or theoretical investigation may conduct it by electing Chemistry 87 three times (counting as three courses toward graduation, but only once toward the minimum group of major courses) or during a leave term of full-time effort. He or she may also request consideration of any appropriate combination of Chemistry 87 and noncredit research. A project concerned with the development of educational materials and experience in teaching will be similar in extent.

Ordinarily, the Honors Program will be undertaken by seniors, but juniors who have progressed sufficiently far in satisfying the normal requirements may be per-mitted to participate. A student who wishes to participate in the Honors Program must apply for admission to the Program by submitting a form, available from the Department staff, before beginning work on an honors project, unless special per-mission has been obtained from the Chair. Before or at the time of application the student must arrange for the supervision of the work, normally by a member of the faculty of the Department. The deadline for applications is the third day of the winter term of the senior year. Additional information is available at http://www.dartmouth.edu/~chem and from the Department administrative office.

Those students who satisfactorily complete the Honors Program with a ‘B+’ average or better in the grade(s) assigned to their honors work at the time of examination will earn Honors recognition in the major or, in appropriate cases, High Honors. High Honors will be granted only by vote of the Department on the basis of outstanding independent work and outstanding performance in the major. An interim evaluation of honors students will be made after one term and continuation will be recommended for those students whose work demonstrates the capacity for satisfactory (B+) work. Students who satisfactorily complete the Honors Program will have Honors in Chemistry or Biophysical Chemistry, or, when appropriate, High Honors in Chemistry or Biophysical Chemistry, entered on their permanent record.

INTEGRATED 4+1 AB/MS PROGRAM IN BIOPHYSICAL CHEMISTRY

Objective and Overview: A 4+1 program to provide Dartmouth undergraduate students an opportunity to acquire a broader and deeper education in modern techniques of biophysical chemistry through a combination of coursework and independent research under the direction of one of the program faculty. With integration of the courses and a substantial effort in the independent research carried out during the senior year, the MS can be obtained in one year directly after completing the AB at Dartmouth.

Participating Faculty: Robert S. Cantor, Computational biophysics of cell membranes, protein-lipid interactions, ion channel kinetics, anesthetic mechanisms; F. Jon Kull, Protein crystallography, molecular motors, cellular transport mechanisms, enzyme mechanisms; transcription factors; bacterial virulence; cholera; Dale F. Mierke, Biophysical chemistry, high resolution NMR, peptide/compound library screening, structure-based drug-design; Ekaterina Pletneva, Biophysical and bioinorganic chemistry, heme proteins, fluorescence studies of protein conformational dynamics, redox chemistry; Dean Wilcox, Thermodynamics of metal-protein interactions, metalloenzymes, nitric oxide biochemistry.

Prerequisite Courses: Students wishing to enter the program must demonstrate proficiency in each of the following areas: biochemistry, chemistry, calculus and physics. Such proficiency will normally be demonstrated by completing the following Dartmouth College courses with at least a B grade prior to entering the Master’s Program: Mathematics 8 (or equivalent) Physics 13-14 (or 15-16, or by permission 3-4) Chemistry 51-52 (or equivalent) Chemistry 41 (or by permission Biology 40) Chemistry 75-76.

Additionally, it is anticipated that the student will begin an independent research project with one of the participating faculty no later than the summer before senior year. An interim evaluation will be made after each term and continuation within the Master’s Program will be recommended for those students whose work demonstrates the capacity for satisfactory independent research.

Admission: Students must apply for admission to the program no later than May 1 of their junior year, although interested students are strongly encouraged to contact the Program Director (Mierke) earlier for advice on prerequisites, and on the scheduling of required courses for the degree. Having explored research opportunities with members of the faculty listed above, the applicant is expected to reach an agreement on a specific project with one of the faculty. The program Admissions Committee (Cantor, Kull, Mierke) will be responsible for reviewing applications and making offers of admission, to be completed by June 30.

A complete application includes: i. A current transcript. ii. Anticipated schedule of courses for senior and fifth year. iii. The name of the research advisor and a brief description of the research project, including a timeline of research effort.

Specific Requirements for the Master’s in Biophysical Chemistry are as follows:

1. Course Distribution Requirements: In addition to the prerequisite courses described above, each student must pass the following courses, either prior to beginning the Master’s Program or as part of the coursework required for the program: Chemistry 42, Chemistry 67, and at least one of the offerings of Chemistry 161 (161.1, 161.2, 161.3, 161.4, 161.5).

2. Required Course Credits: During the Master’s Program, each student must pass with a grade of P or better at least eight courses from the offerings in biophysical chemistry. Two terms of Graduate Research Colloquium and up to four courses in graduate-level research may count in the eight-course total. Note: Courses taken as an undergraduate can fulfill the “Course Distribution Requirements” described above, but do not count toward the eight courses required for the Master’s degree.

3. Competency Requirement: The student must demonstrate competency in the fundamentals of a biophysical chemistry methodology, including X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy/FRET, experimental characterization of binding processes, or biomolecular computer simulations. This requirement will be satisfied by successful defense of the topic in an oral examination and must be completed before the end of winter term.

4. Thesis Requirement: The student must complete a satisfactory thesis based on independent-original research. The thesis must be approved by three program members and successfully defended in an oral examination.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER’S DEGREE (M.S.)

The general requirements for the Master’s degree, together with the specific requirements of the Department of Chemistry normally allow completion of the degree in two years.

The specific requirements are as follows:

1. Each student must pass with a grade of P or better eight courses from the offerings in chemistry and allied areas that have been chosen in consultation with the adviser and approved by the Graduate Student Advisory Committee (GSAC). Chemistry 256 and one term of Chemistry 257 may count. Up to four courses may be in graduate-level research, but they may not include the Colloquium course 140 or any course in the 260 series, nor may courses numbered below 100 count in the eight-course total.

2. The student must complete a satisfactory thesis and pass creditably an oral examination upon this thesis.

3. In the course of this training, the student must gain experience in teaching, including completion of Chemistry 256.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DOCTOR’S DEGREE (PH.D.) IN CHEMISTRY

A student will be admitted to candidacy for the doctorate after satisfying the following requirements:

1. Completion, by the start of the Fall term of the student’s second year in the program, through an appropriate combination of Dartmouth courses or perfor-mance on diagnostic entrance examinations, of a breadth requirement in three of the four topical areas of biological, inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry.

2. Passing within a specified time a total of five cumulative examinations in chemistry at an advanced level, at least three of which must be from an area closely allied with the student’s research area.

3. Presentation before the Department of a lecture unrelated to the thesis topic.

4. Submission and oral defense of an original research proposal in an area removed from the student’s own thesis research.

The candidate will receive the doctorate upon:

1. Satisfactory completion of an original thesis project of high quality and sub-stantial significance, and approval of the thesis embodying the results of this research.

2. Successful defense of this thesis in an oral examination.

A candidate for the doctorate will take various courses in chemistry and allied fields that are pertinent to their area of study. He or she will also participate actively in undergraduate teaching, including completion of Chemistry 256. It is anticipated that a graduate student will normally complete all of the requirements for the doctorate in approximately five years. It is not necessary to earn a master’s degree as a prerequisite to the doctorate.

More complete information can be obtained from the brochure, Graduate Study in Chemistry at Dartmouth, obtainable from the Department of Chemistry.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DOCTOR’S DEGREE (PH.D.) IN CHEMISTRY-MATERIALS

A student will be admitted to candidacy for the doctorate after satisfying the following requirements:

1. Completion, by the start of the Fall term of the student’s second year in the program, through an appropriate combination of Dartmouth courses or perfor-mance on diagnostic entrance examinations, of a breadth requirement in three of the four topical areas of biological, inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry.

2. Successful completion, by the end of the student’s third year in the program, of four core courses satisfying the breadth requirement in Materials Chemistry, and a minimum of three elective courses selected from the Chemistry-Materials elective course list.

3. Annual presentation of a Research in Progress lecture to the Materials Chemistry Group, and submission of an annual research progress report to the student’s Research Advisory Committee.

4. Submission and oral defense of an original research proposal in an area removed from the student’s own thesis research.

The candidate will receive the doctorate upon:

1. Satisfactory completion of an original thesis project of high quality and sub-stantial significance, and approval of the thesis embodying the results of this research.

2. Successful defense of this thesis in an oral examination.

A candidate for the doctorate will take additional courses in chemistry and allied fields as required for their area of study. He or she will also participate actively in undergraduate teaching, including completion of Chemistry 256. Students are required to attend research discussion meetings of the Center for Nanomaterials Research at Dartmouth, as well as seminars designated as Materials Seminars by the Center. It is anticipated that a graduate student will normally complete all of the requirements for the doctorate in approximately five years. It is not necessary to earn a master’s degree as a prerequisite to the doctorate.