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Asian and Middle Eastern Studies

COURSES OFFERED:

1. Hindi-Urdu as a Cultural System

11F: 10A

Hindi and Urdu are virtually identical in terms of grammar and basic vocabulary, but they use two writing systems, and vocabulary on the advanced level differs almost completely. Yet Hindi and Urdu have been considered one language at various times throughout their history. Students will learn both writing systems, master basic grammar and conversation, and explore texts and contexts that elucidate the cultural history of the language. Rockwell.

4. Introduction to Arab Culture (Identical to, and described under, Arabic 10)

12W: 10, 13S: 12

Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Abouali.

5. Thought and Change in the Middle East and Central Asia (Identical to, and described under, Anthropology 27)

13S: 10A

Dist: SOC; WCult: NW. Eickelman.

6. Islam: An Anthropological Approach (Identical to, and described under, Anthropology 19)

11F: 10A

Dist: SOC; WCult: CI. Eickelman.

8. Introduction to Islam (Identical to, and described under, Religion 8)

Not offered in the period from 11F through 13S

Dist: TMV; WCult: NW. Reinhart.

9. Hinduism (Identical to, and described under, Religion 9)

Not offered in the period from 11F through 13S

Dist: TMV; WCult: NW. Ohnuma.

10. The Religions of China (Identical to, and described under, Religion 10)

12W, 13W: 10

Dist: TMV; WCult: NW. Raz.

11. Introduction to Korean Culture

11F, 12F: 2A

Dist: SOC; WCult: CI. Kim and Suh.

12. Introduction to Chinese Culture (Identical to, and described under, Chinese 10)

12S: 12

Dist: LIT; WCult: CI. Blader.

13. Introduction to Japanese Culture (Identical to, and described under, Japanese 10)

12S, 13S: 11

Dist: LIT; WCult: CI. Washburn.

15. Modern Islam (Identical to, and described under, Religion 16)

12X, 13S: 12

Dist: TMV; WCult: NW. Reinhart.

17. Introduction to Hebraic and Israeli Culture (Identical to Hebrew 10 and Jewish Studies 16, and described under, Hebrew 10)

12S, 13S: 10A

Dist: LIT; WCult: CI. Glinert.

18. History and Culture of Indonesia

12S, 13S: 12

The history and contemporary issues of the island nation of Indonesia—home to the world’s fourth largest population—will be examined in religion, politics, literature and language, with particular attention to the independence movement and the development of a national identity. Course resources will include readings in fiction and non-fiction, work-shops in performing arts, guest instructors, and multi-media materials both by and about Indonesians. WCult: NW. Diamond.

19. Introduction to South Asia

Not offered in the period from 11F through 13S

WCult: NW.

20. Japan’s Linguistic Modernity: The Anthropology of Japanese Language and Society (Identical to, and described under, Anthropology 50.6)

Not offered in the period from 11F through 13S

Dist: SOC; WCult: CI. Ball.

21. Topics in Korean Studies

12W, 12S, 13W, 13S: 2A

In 12W, Cultural Struggles in Colonial Korea. This course explores Korean history between 1876 and 1945, as Korea entered the modern period. First, we will examine how Japan, China, and Korea responded to Western imperialism in the 19th century, and then how China and Korea responded to Japanese imperialism early in the 20th century. The second half of the class will explore the Japanese colonial government’s assimilation policy during the colonial period in Korea, and how Korea was affected by and reacted to various aspects of this policy. The establishment of historiography, formulation of aesthetic and cultural cannons, and shaping of images of Koreans and their land will be explored by examining diverse media including literature, photographs, exhibition catalogues, and other primary sources. The class will conclude with the continuing legacy of the Japanese colonial period. Dist: ART or INT; WCult: CI. Kim.

In 12S, Science and Technology in the Making of Modern Korea. Suh.

22. “Journeys Through Foreign Worlds”: Travel and Travel Narratives on the Middle East and Asia

12W: 2

Why do we travel now, and why have men and women traveled in the past? According to George Santayana, we sometimes travel “to escape into open solitudes, into aimlessness...to sharpen the edge of life, to taste hardship.” People have often traveled in search of knowledge, to perform pilgrimages, conduct trade, or escape war and hardship. In this course, we will examine the nature of travel, writings about travel, and the cultural encounters inherent in travel. We will be focusing on travel narratives describing journeys throughout the Middle East and Asia from the medieval period to the 20th century. Abouali.

24. Asian Performance Traditions (Identical to Theater 24 and Women’s and Gender Studies 59.03, and described under Theater 24)

12S: 2A

Dist: ART; WCult: NW. Chin.

25. Unveiling the Harem Dancer (Identical to, and described under, Theater 10)

12W: 12

Dist: INT; WCult: NW. Yessayan.

26. Anthropology of Tibet and the Himalayas (Identical to, and described under, Anthropology 32)

13S: 2A

Dist: SOC, WCult: NW. Craig.

27. Gender and Modern Media in India (Identical to Women’s and Gender Studies 91)

12W, 13W: D.F.S.P. WCult: NW. Haynes.

28. Contemporary Social Movements in India (Identical to Women’s and Gender Studies 92)

12W, 13W: D.F.S.P. WCult: NW. Haynes.

29. Foreign Study in India

12W, 13W: D.F.S.P. Dist: SOC; WCult: NW. Haynes.

Colonialism, Nationalism, and Gender in India (identical to Women’s and Gender Studies 90). This course will examine the changing character of gender ideologies and gender relations in India under colonial rule. Topics include British views on the position of women in India; the development of social reform movements during the nineteenth century; colonialism and the law; “subaltern” women and economic change; the construction of masculinity; early nationalism and patriarchy; Gandhi’s views on women; women and the Indian nationalist movement; sexuality and the birth control movement; and Hindu-Muslim violence and gender. Dist: SOC; WCult: NW. Haynes.

30. Global Sounds (Identical to, and described under, Music 4)

12W, 12S, 13W: 10A

Dist: ART; WCult: NW. Levin, Boyer

33. Discovering an Islamic City

12S, 13S: D.F.S.P.

This course analyzes the historical and contemporary urban life of a traditional Islamic city as seen through the eyes of the town’s scholars, planners, educators, writers, and crafts people, as well as scholarly readings that have shaped discussions in anthropology, history, and the history of religions. Fez is the locus of classical discussions of urbanism, public space, and civic life in the Muslim world. Participating in the life of the city, students have an opportunity to experience first hand its educational, economic, religious, kinship, and political institutions. Dist: SOC; WCult: NW. Green, Vandewalle.

34. Environment and Development in the Himalayas and Tibet (Identical to, and described under, Geography 80)

12S: 2

Dist: SOC; WCult: NW. Bauer.

35. Visual Cultures of South Asia

12W: 2

Dist: ART; WCult: NW. Elison.

36. Hindu Hierarchies: Caste in Theory and Practice (Identical to, and described under, Religion 40).

11F: 10

Dist: TMV; WCult: NW. Elison.

37. Modern Hinduism: Colonial and Nationalist Contexts (Identical to, and described under, Religion 19.1).

12S: 2

WCult: NW. Elison.

38. Introduction to Korean Art (Identical to, and described under, Art History 61)

12S: 2A

Dist: ART; WCult: NW. Kim.

40. Topics in Interregional Asian and Middle Eastern Studies

11F, 12X: 2A

In 11F, Magic and Supernaturalism in Asian Literature and Film. This course examines magical and supernatural elements in literature and films from China, Japan, India and Southeast Asia. It studies artistic, psychological and political implications and interregional traditions of folklore and fiction. Literary texts include Pu Song Lin’s Strange Tales from a Studio, Catherine Lim’s They Do Return, Batin Long bin Hok’s Jah Hut Tales and Othman Wok’s Malayan Horror. Films may include Akira Kurosawa’s Dreams, Masaki Kobayashi’s Kwaidan and contemporary works such as Chan Wook Park’s Extremes. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Chin.

In 12X: 2A, Asian Animation as Socio-Political Artifact. Because animated films have traditionally been targeted at children, animators in Asia have often been able to side-step much of the political control exercised by some of their more centralized governments to create sophisticated artistic works. Students will analyze works from China, Japan, Korea, India and Iran within a socio-political and cultural context. Faculty from AMES will provide guest lectures on Asian history and politics. Dist: INT/ART; WCult: NW. Ehrlich.

45. Ethnomusicology (Identical to, and described under, Music 45)

12W, 13W: 2A

Dist: ART; WCult: NW. Levin.

54. Arabic as a Cultural System

12S, 13S: D.F.S.P.

Examines the historical and cultural factors and forces that have molded and continue to mold colloquial Moroccan Arabic. This course includes an appreciation of the nonverbal aspects—gestures and body language—of communication and identity in the Moroccan setting. It also offers a minimal functional mastery of practical communicative skills—the sound system, basic sentence patterns, and everyday vocabulary of colloquial Moroccan Arabic—as well as a knowledge of the Arabic script, a key element of Islamic civilization and identity. WCult: NW. Green, Vandewalle.

85. Independent Research

All terms: Arrange

Independent research under the direction of members of the staff. Students should consult with a member of the staff in the term preceding the term in which the independent work is to be done.

86. Advanced Independent Research

All terms: Arrange

Advanced independent research under the direction of members of the staff. Proposals must be developed by the student in consultation with a faculty advisor and must be approved by the Steering Committee by the fifth week in the term preceding the term in which the independent study is to be taken. This course is a possible substitute for AMES 91.

87. Honors Thesis

All terms: Arrange

Open only to AMES majors who are participating in the Honors Program. See guidelines under “AMES Honors Program.”

91. Senior Seminar: Research Topics in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies

12W, 13W: 10A

Open to AMES majors, this is the normal culminating course for majors. All participants will complete research projects related to their specialization within AMES. If space per-mits, non-AMES majors may enroll after obtaining permission of the instructor.

In 12W, Asia, the Middle East and the Cold War (identical to History 96). Miller.

In 13W, Dilemmas of Development: India, China, and Egypt (identical to Government 84.01). Vandewalle.

OTHER APPROVED COURSES IN AMES

All departmental and program courses that have been approved for credit toward the AMES major are listed by area of concentration on the AMES web site: http://www.dartmouth.edu/~asia/, or on the planning sheets available outside the AMES/DAMELL office in Bartlett Hall or downloadable from the web site.