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Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Literatures

DEPARTMENT COURSES:

ASIAN AND MIDDLE EASTERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES (AMELL)

7. First-Year Seminars in Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Literatures

Consult special listings.

17. Discourse, Culture, and Identity in Asia and the Middle East (Identical to Linguistics 11)

12F: 10A

This course introduces theories of identity, discourse, and communication, and illustrates how Asian and Middle Eastern cultures employ language to construct and reflect values, identities and institutions, to create relationships and project personal status, and to perform actions (such as ending a phone call, apologizing, paying compliments, and negotiating business deals). Particular attention will be paid to the beliefs people hold about their languages and scripts. No prior knowledge of a particular language or culture is assumed. Open to all classes. Dist: SOC or INT; WCult: CI. Glinert.

18. Language and Society in Asia and the Middle East

12W, 12X: 10A

This course explores how Asian and Middle Eastern societies employ language to construct and reflect social structures and identities. Particular attention will be paid to multilingualism, literacy, language attitudes, and language planning -- with ethnicity, religion, and other social values playing key roles. The major focus will be on China, Japan, Korea, Israel and the Arab world, and students will be able to select these or other Asian/Middle Eastern societies for their final paper. No prior knowledge of a particular language or culture is assumed. Open to all classes. Dist: SOC or INT; WCult: CI. Glinert.

85. Independent Research

All terms: Arrange

Under the direction of members of the faculty. Students should consult with a member of the faculty in the term preceding the term in which the independent work is to be done. A research proposal must be submitted to the Department for approval.

87. Honors Thesis

All terms: Arrange

Open only to AMELL majors who are participating in the Honors Program. See guidelines under ‘Honors Program.’

ARABIC LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

1-2-3. First-Year Courses in Arabic

1. 11F, 12F: 9S, 9S, 10+

2. 12W: 9S, 9S 13W: 9S, 10+

3. 12S, 13S: 9S, 9S

An introduction to written and spoken Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). In addition to mastering the basics of grammar, emphasis is placed on active functional communication in the language, reading comprehension, and listening comprehension. Mandatory apprentice-teacher-run drill sessions meet four times/week (4 hours/week) for all beginning Arabic language classes. Never serve in partial satisfaction of Distributive or World Culture requirements. The staff.

10. Introduction to Arab Culture (Identical to Asian and Middle Eastern Studies 4)

12W, 13S: 12

This course will provide a broad introduction to the historical, literary, artistic, and popular cultures of the Middle East, from pre-and early Islamic times to the present. The aim of the course is to give students an appreciation of Arab and Arabo-Islamic culture, but also to examine ways in which prevailing historical, political, economic, and social conditions have impacted cultural production and expression in the Middle East. Sources and texts will include, but not be limited to, selections from the Quran, hadith, Arabic poetry and literature, historical chronicles, and film. Required for the FSP, major and minor. Dist: LIT; WCult: CI. Abouali, Smolin.

11. Special Topics in Arabic Studies

11F, 12F: D.F.S.P. (Dartmouth in Morocco)

WCult: NW. Ouajjani.

21-22-23. Intermediate Arabic

21. 11F, 12F: 10

22. 12W, 13W: 11

23. 12S, 13S: 10A

Intermediate level of Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Continuation of presentation of fundamentals of grammar and development of proficiency in reading, writing, spoken communication skills, and aural comprehension, including much authentic cultural material. Prerequisite: Arabic 3 or equivalent. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Ouajjani, Chahboun.

24. Formal Spoken Arabic

Not offered in the period from 11F through 13S

Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Kadhim.

25. Moroccan Arabic

12X, 13X: 10

This course will introduce students to the colloquial language spoken today in Morocco. In addition to emphasizing grammar and vocabulary, this course will focus on daily communication and teach students how to interact with Moroccans in a wide variety of settings. Attention will also be paid to the role of culture in communication. Prerequisite: Arabic 3, or the equivalent, or permission of the instructor. WCult: NW. Chahboun.

31, 32. Advanced Arabic

11F, 12F: D.F.S.P. (Dartmouth in Morocco)

A continuation of the fundamentals of grammar and further acquisition of spoken communication skills, aural comprehension, and proficiency in reading and writing. This is an intensive course that integrates the FSP homestays and the local environment into course materials. Students will be expected to master a wide variety of reading and videomaterials. Prerequisites: two out of the following three courses: Arabic 21, 22, 23, or permission of the instructor, or the equivalent. WCult: NW. Ouajjani.

34. Media Arabic

Not offered in the period from 11F through 13S

Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Kadhim.

41-42-43. Advanced Arabic

41. 11F, 12F: By arranged time

42. 12W: 10A Abu-Deeb 13W: By arranged time

43. 12S: 10A Abu-Deeb 13S: 10

This three-course series may be taken non-sequentially. Readings for the courses are extensive and of a high level of complexity; they are drawn from a variety of genres and periods. The progression towards full proficiency in the language is a fundamental objective of the sequence. The courses will be conducted entirely in Arabic.

Prerequisite: Two third-year level Arabic courses, or permission of the instructor.

Dist: LIT: WCult: NW. The staff.

59. Independent Advanced Study in Arabic Language and Literature

All terms except summer: Arrange

Available to students who wish to do advanced or independent study in Arabic. The student must first submit a proposal to the Major/Minor advisor and the section faculty, before obtaining permission from the faculty member with whom he or she wishes to work. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. The staff.

Courses numbered 61 - 63 are literature-in-translation courses, not requiring Arabic.

61. Topics in Modern Arabic Literature and Culture

12S: 3B 12X: 2A 13W: 2

This course is an introduction to the study of modern Arabic literature through readings and discussion of key texts in prose and poetry from the 19th and 20th centuries. Each offering of the course will be organized around a particular author, genre, theme, or period. Topics may include, inter alia, the question of tradition and modernity, the construction of an Arab national identity, the colonial encounter, post-coloniality, and the status of women in Arab society. May be repeated for credit if topic varies. Courses listed under Arabic 61 are open to students of all classes.

In 12S, Modern Arabic Poetry: From Ideologies of Freedom to Freedom from Ideologies. Abu-Deeb.

In 12X, Modern Arabic Fiction. This course is an introduction to twentieth-century fiction across the Arab world. Looking at works from North Africa to the Middle East, we will examine how Arab writers and filmmakers have dealt with such themes as nationalism, immigration, freedom, sexuality, war, violence, and religion. Authors include Tayyib Salih, Mohamed Choukri, Ghassan Kanafani, Tahar Wattar, and Hanah al-Shaykh, among others. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Smolin.

In 13W, Modern Arabic Literature in Translation: Narrating Tradition, Change, and Identity (Identical to Comparative Literature 53). This course is an introduction to the modern Arabic narrative tradition through the close reading, in translation, of a number of key texts by major twentieth-century Arab authors. The course will consider how perceptions of tradition, change, and identity are represented in modern Arabic literature. Examination of themes, literary styles, and assumptions pertaining to the function of literature and to the nature of human experience will be undertaken. Readings will be drawn from the works of Naguib Mahfouz (Egypt), Tayyib Salih (Sudan), Imil Habibi (Palestine), Hanan Al Shaykh (Lebanon), and others. The course will be taught in English. No prerequisites. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Kadhim.

62. Topics in Classical Arabic Literature and Culture

12W: 2 12F: 10A

Classical Arabic literature spans over thirteen centuries from pre-Islamic times until the advent of the modern Arab “renaissance” in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Among the outstanding products of this literature are the famed pre-Islamic qasidahs, the adab works of the Abbasid al-Jahiz, the maqamas of al-Hariri, the exquisite lyrics of the Andalusian Ibn Zaydun, and the celebrated One Thousand and One Nights. Each offering of the course will focus on a particular author, genre, theme, or period. The course is con-ducted entirely in English. May be repeated for credit if topic varies. Courses listed under Arabic 62 are open to students of all classes.

In 12W, The Arabian Nights East and West (Identical to Comparative Literature 35). An introduction to Arabo-Islamic culture through its most accessible and popular exponent, One Thousand and One Nights. The course will take this masterpiece of world literature as the focal point for a multidisciplinary literary study. It will cover the genesis of the text from Indian and Mediterranean antecedents, its Arabic recensions, its reception in the West, and its influence on European literature. The course will be taught in English in its entirety. No prerequisites. Dist: LIT or INT; WCult: NW. Kadhim.

In 12F, The Experience of Place, Time, and Death: Love, the Body, and Sexuality, and Sufi Experience in Classical Arabic Literature. Abu-Deeb.

63. Themes in Arabic Literature and Culture

11F, 13S: 12

Arabic literature is widely regarded as the foremost intellectual and artistic accomplishment of the Arabs. In the course of over fourteen centuries of vigorous literary activity, Arab poets and writers have elaborated a set of themes that inform Arabo-Islamic culture in profound ways. Offerings of this course might range from the examination of a particular theme to broader comparative studies. May be repeated for credit if topic varies. Courses listed under Arabic 63 are open to students of all classes.

Society, Culture, and Gender in the Middle East. This course will examine the ways in which society, culture, and gender intersect and give shape to various institutions and ideologies in the Arab Middle East. The role of women in Islamic and Middle-Eastern society will be looked at in historical perspective, and will serve as the primary lens through which Middle-Eastern society, aspects of its culture, and the constructions of gender will be explored. We will examine such topics as family, marriage and divorce, sexuality, colonialism, and nationalism through a variety of historical and literary texts and visual media. Familiarity with Middle-Eastern history or Islam is helpful, but not required. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Abouali.

Courses numbered 81 or above are advanced seminar courses.

81. Topics in Arabic Literature and Culture

12W, 12F: 3B

This seminar is designed to examine closely literary and cultural texts employing theoretical and historical sources. Topics vary but might range from studies of individual authors to broader comparative themes.

In 12W and 12F, Edward Said and Cultural Studies: A Comparative Approach. (Identical to Comparative Literature 50) Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Abu-Deeb.

CHINESE LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

1-2-3. First-Year Courses in Chinese

1. 11F, 12F: 9S, 9S, 10+

2. 12W, 13W: 9S, 10+

3. 12S, 13S: 9S, 10+

An introduction to spoken and written Modern Standard Chinese. Conversational drill and comprehension exercises in classroom and laboratory provide practice in pronunciation and the use of the basic patterns of speech. Intensive reading is conducted for textbook lessons. Grammar is explained, and written exercises given. Traditional characters are learned in Chinese 1 and 2; simplified characters are introduced in Chinese 3. Classes are conducted increasingly in Chinese. Mandatory student-run drill sessions meet Monday to Thursday for fifty minutes each day for all beginning Chinese language classes.

Satisfactory completion of Chinese 3 fulfills the language requirement. Never serve in partial satisfaction of Distributive or World Culture requirements. The staff.

4. Advanced First-Year Chinese

11F, 12F: 9S, 11, 12

This course is designed for students with varying, minimal levels of competence in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Weekly class hours include four sixty-five minute sessions with the master teacher and up to four fifty-minute drill and/or conversation sessions. There are weekly exams, a midterm, and a final, as well as writing assignments, oral presentations, and supplementary work assigned as needed. This course seeks to achieve two goals: 1) to help students equalize their levels of the required speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills; 2) to allow them to raise these levels and thereby significantly increase their understanding of Modern Standard Chinese. Chinese 4 is an accelerated first-year course.

Satisfactory completion of Chinese 4 places the student into the 20-level series. Students who plan to use this course to fulfill the language requirement may not take it under the Non-Recording Option. Never serves in partial satisfaction of Distributive or World Culture requirements. Li, Chen.

10. Introduction to Chinese Culture (Identical to AMES 12)

12S: 12

The aim of this course is to provide students with a basic knowledge and appreciation of Chinese culture. We will examine the evolution of Chinese culture and identity from the earliest Chinese dynasties, dating back more than 3500 years, to the present day. Through readings of literary texts in translation, students will be introduced to topics in language, history, literature and art, philosophy and social and political institutions. The course is open to students of all classes. It is required for participation in the FSP, for the major, and the minor. Dist: LIT; WCult: CI. Blader.

11. Special Topics in Chinese Studies

11F, 12X, 12F, 13X: D.F.S.P. (Dartmouth in China)

WCult: NW. The staff.

FSP and LSA+ Language Courses: 22-23, 31-32, 41-42. Intermediate or advanced Modern Chinese (please see description under “Dartmouth Foreign Study Program and LSA+ in Beijing”)

22-23. Intermediate Modern Chinese (Second-year level)

22. 12W: 9S, 11 13W: 10, 11

23. 12S, 13S: 11, 12

Chinese 22 and 23 cover a full second-year level course, using the textbook Integrated Chinese, Level Two and a variety of other materials. The course is designed for students who have completed Chinese 4 or Chinese 21 or the equivalent. Students who have only completed Chinese 3 may be eligible for this course with permission of the instructor. Class hours include four sixty-five or five fifty-minute sessions with the master teacher and up to four fifty-minute drill and/or conversation sessions. There are weekly exams, a midterm, and a final, as well as writing assignments, oral presentations, and supplementary work assigned as needed. This series is intended to raise the student’s levels in speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills and, thereby, significantly increase their understanding of Modern Standard Chinese. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Xing, Li.

31-32-33. Advanced Modern Chinese (Third-year level)

31. 11F, 12F: 10

32. 12W: 11 13W: 10

33. 12S, 13S: 11

This series may be taken non-sequentially, and any single course repeated, if content is different. Readings will be selected from literary, political, and historical publications. There will be regular exams, writing exercises, oral presentations, and supplementary work assigned as needed.

Prerequisite: Chinese 23 or permission of the instructor. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Bu, the staff.

41. Advanced Chinese (Fourth-year level)

12X, 13X: 12

Advanced readings from literary, political, and historical publications.

Prerequisite: Two third-year level Chinese courses or permission of the instructor. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Bu, the staff.

42. Advanced Chinese (Fourth-year level)

11F, 12F: 9S

Advanced reading from literary, political, and historical publications.

Prerequisite: Two third-year level Chinese courses or permission of the instructor. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Bu, Kam, the staff.

43. Advanced Chinese (Fourth-year level)

12S: 10A 13W: 9S

Advanced reading from literary, political, and historical publications.

Prerequisite: Two third-year level Chinese courses or permission of the instructor. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Bu, Li.

44. Readings in Modern Chinese Literature

44.1 Chinese Martial Arts Fiction

Not offered in the period from 11F through 13S

Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Xing.

44.2 Modern Chinese Poetry

Not offered in the period from 11F through 13S

An introduction to modern Chinese poetry. Rebelling against over two thousand years of poetic tradition, Chinese poetry of the twentieth century represents one of the major achievements of modern Chinese literature and reflects the brilliance of young literary talent. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Xing.

51. Introduction to Classical Chinese

12W, 13W: 10A

An introduction to the basic grammar and vocabulary of the Classical Chinese language, using examples from a selection of texts from the Warring States Period (5th to 3rd century B.C.E.).

Prerequisite: First-year Chinese. This course is a requirement for majors in the Chinese language and literature track. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Allan.

52. Readings in Classical Chinese: Daoist Philosophical Texts

13S: 10A

Readings in the Daoist classics, such as the Laozi Daodejing and the Zhuangzi. Readings will be in the original Chinese. Emphasis will be placed on key philosophical issues, such as the meaning of the Way in Daoist texts and the relationship of language to thought.

Prerequisite: Chinese 51. Chinese 52 may be considered a non-language course. Dist: TMV; WCult: NW. Allan.

53. Readings in Classical Chinese: Confucian Philosophical Texts

12S: 10A

Readings in the Confucian classics, primarily Mencius and Xunzi. Readings will be in the original Chinese. Emphasis will be placed on key philosophical issues, such as the concept of kingship in ancient China and the debate on human nature.

Prerequisite: Chinese 51. Chinese 53 may be considered a non-language course. Dist: TMV; WCult: NW. Allan.

54. Classical Chinese Poetry

Not offered in the period from 11F through 13S

Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Xing.

59. Independent Advanced Study in Chinese Language and Literature

All terms: Arrange

Available to students who wish to do advanced or independent study in Chinese. Chinese 59 may be considered a non-language course with approval of the advisor. The student must first submit a proposal to the Major/Minor advisor, and the section faculty, before obtaining permission from the faculty member with whom he or she wishes to work. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. The staff.

Courses numbered 61 - 63 are literature-in-translation courses, not requiring Chinese.

61. Topics in Modern Chinese Literature and Culture

Not offered in the period from 11F through 13S

62. Topics in Traditional Chinese Literature and Culture

12W: 2A 13W: 2A 13S: 3B

Traditional Chinese literature ranges from the earliest examples—divinations inscribed on turtle plastrons and ox scapulae dating back more than 3000 years—to the popular knight-errant novels of the early 19th century. The Opium War of 1839-42 is taken as the cut off point for courses in this topic category, which considers cultural as well as literary themes. Courses reflect the interests and expertise of the teaching staff and include early Chinese culture, the development of the Chinese script, historical prose, fiction and drama, poetry, and oral literature. Courses under this rubric are defined by historical period and/or literary genres. Courses listed under Chinese 62 are open to students of all classes.

In 12W, 62.1, Early Chinese Culture. A survey of early Chinese culture. The literary tradition will be taken as the primary evidence in the reconstruction and students will read early Chinese poetry and historical texts in translation. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Kam.

In 13S, 62.2, Chinese Calligraphy. This course is a survey of the major script types in the Chinese writing system and an introduction to the art of Chinese calligraphy. Along with studying the history of Chinese calligraphy, the student will learn about the similar technical origins of Chinese calligraphy and painting, study and practice the basic techniques of Chinese calligraphy, and learn the basic rules of formation of Chinese characters. Classroom practice will give the student hands-on experience of using traditional Chinese writing tools. Dist: ART; WCult: NW. Xing.

63. Themes in Chinese Literature and Culture

11F: 10A

Courses under this rubric will provide the student with a comprehensive view of the most frequently occurring themes in Chinese literary writings from the second millennium B.C.E. to the present. The most prominent among these themes are love (patriotic, familial, romantic, and platonic) and social protest. Individual literary genres in China have traditionally been associated, in a general way, with historical/dynastic periods. Therefore, tracing the evolution, for example, of the theme of romantic love will lead the student through the multiplicity of ways that an idea can be transformed by diverse literary mediums and different historical periods. In reaching a fundamental understanding through literature of the Chinese way of looking at a specific idea as it evolved over time, we will understand better the uniqueness of both Chinese values and institutions. Courses listed under Chinese 63 are open to students of all classes.

In 11F, 63.2, Martial Arts Fiction in English Translation. This course introduces the Chinese martial arts novel, or the wuxia xiaoshuo, in particular the novels of the New Wave of the 1950s-1970s. This period represents the martial arts novel at the height of its achievement. The novels of this period are not only critically received, but also immensely popular. We will read two novels by Jin Yong, one novel by Gu Long, and an early novel from the late 19th century, all in translation, with excerpts from other novels if time permits. We will examine the paradigmatic assumptions that underlie the novels as a genre, as well as various aspects of Chinese culture that provide a context for the wuxia novel. These aspects, in turn, are transformed into a popular articulation of Chinese culture and nostalgia. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Kam.

Courses numbered 81 or above are advanced seminar courses.

81. Lu Xun and Hu Shi

13W: 2A

Through the writings of Lu Xun (1881-1936) and Hu Shi (1891-1962), two of the most important scholar-writers of the twentieth century, this course will examine several issues that were raised during the first two decades of this century by Chinese intellectuals who felt an acute, ever-increasing inadequacy of their own cultural heritage in the face of Western democracy and technological and scientific advancements. Those issues, raised more than seven decades ago, have persistently engaged the central attention of modern Chinese intellectuals, and include discussions of China’s modernization (or Westernization) and of China’s vernacular language movement, debates about various political and social philosophies, questions surrounding the so-called new culture movement, and other such issues. The seminar will be conducted in English; however, readings will include several original articles in Chinese. Permission of instructor required. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Mowry.

83. Topics in Chinese Literature and Culture

12S, 13S: 2A

Key Concepts of Confucian and Daoist Philosophical Thought. In this course, we will examine the imagery at the root of certain key concepts, such as the Way (dao), non-action (wu wei), the mind/heart (xin), energy/ether/breath (qi), in early Chinese philosophy, and explore the relationship between these images and the structure of early Chinese philosophical thought. Students will do readings in metaphor theory, as well as in early Chinese philosophical texts, such as the Analects, the Mencius, Laozi Daodejing, and Zhuangzi. Advanced level of Chinese is required. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Allan.

HEBREW LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

1-2-3. First-Year Courses in Modern Hebrew

1. 11F, 12F: 2

2. 12W, 13W: 2

3. 12S, 13S: 2

An introduction to spoken and written Modern Israeli Hebrew (MIH). In addition to mastering the basics of grammar, emphasis is placed on active functional communication in the language, reading comprehension, and listening comprehension. Mandatory student-run drill sessions meet four times/week for one hour (4 hours/week) for all beginning Hebrew language classes. Never serve in partial satisfaction of Distributive or World Culture requirements. Ben Yehuda.

10. Introduction to Hebraic and Israeli Culture (Identical to AMES 17 and Jewish Studies 16)

12S, 13S: 10A

This course explores the interaction of Hebrew literature, film, music, religion, and society. For millennia, Hebrew has had a unique spiritual hold on both the Jewish and Christian identity. We will focus on the Bible as wisdom, law, and poetry, the Talmud of the ancient Rabbis, Kabbalah and Hebrew alphabet mysticism, war and the Israeli cinema, Hebrew folk and rock culture, and a modern political mystery: how today’s Hebrew created a new Jewish identity. Required for the major and minor.

No knowledge of Hebrew is required. Dist: LIT; WCult: CI. Glinert.

21-22. Intermediate Modern Hebrew

21. 11F, 12F: By arranged time

22. 12S, 13S: By arranged time

Continued study of Modern Israeli Hebrew grammar and syntax. Emphasis is placed on acquisition of the spoken language and on listening and reading comprehension. The course includes selected readings from contemporary Hebrew authors.

Prerequisite: Hebrew 3 or permission of instructor. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Ben Yehuda.

23. Intermediate Modern Hebrew

Not offered in the period from 11F through 13S

Prerequisite: Hebrew 22 or permission of instructor. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Ben Yehuda.

31. Advanced Modern Hebrew

Not offered in the period from 11F through 13S

Prerequisite: Hebrew 23 or permission of instructor. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. The staff.

32. Advanced Modern Hebrew

Not offered in the period from 11F through 13S

Prerequisite: Hebrew 31 or permission of instructor. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. The staff.

33. Advanced Modern Hebrew

Not offered in the period from 11F through 13S

Prerequisite: Hebrew 32 or equivalent. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. The staff.

51. The Hebrew of the Bible (Identical to Jewish Studies 24.1)

12W, 13W: By arranged time

An introduction to the language of the Hebrew Bible. The course teaches basic Biblical grammar, script, and vocabulary for recognition. Readings will be taken from a sampling of Biblical texts.

This course serves as a requirement for students wishing to major and minor in Hebrew language and literature. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Ben Yehuda.

59. Independent Advanced Study in Hebrew Language and Literature

All terms except summer: Arrange

Available to students who wish to do advanced or independent study in Hebrew. The student must first submit a proposal to the Major/Minor advisor, and the section faculty, before obtaining permission from the faculty member with whom he or she wishes to work. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Glinert.

Courses numbered 61 - 63 are literature-in-translation courses, not requiring Hebrew.

61. Topics in Modern Hebrew Literature and Culture

12W, 12X: 2A

Emerging in 18th and 19th century Europe, Modern Hebrew literature produced the Hasidic anecdote and fable seeking to revitalize the religious Jewish masses; then the excited and tortured novels and poetry of Jewish intellectuals seeking to Westernize themselves while remaining true to their roots; and now, the radically different literature of contemporary Israel dealing with Zionism, modernity, the lonely individual, war and peace. Courses listed under Hebrew 61 are open to students of all classes.

Film, Fiction, and the Arab-Israeli Conflict (Identical to Jewish Studies 42). This course explores Israeli cinema in the context of the social and historical backdrop of the Arab-Israeli conflict and the painful emergence of a new Jewish-Israeli identity in the shadow of the Holocaust and constant warfare. We will study a dozen films in depth, situate them in the evolution of an Israeli cinema, and consider the problems of turning fiction into film. Dist: LIT; WCult: W. Glinert.

62. Topics in Classical Hebrew Literature and Culture

12F: 2A

Classical Hebrew literature spans 3000 years, from the Biblical period until the advent of Jewish ‘modernity’ in the 18th-19th centuries, and reflects the lives and values of Jews in their ancient homeland and across the Ashkenazi and Sephardi diasporas. Among the outstanding products of this literature, whose effects on Jewish and Western civilization have been incalculable, are the Bible, the Midrash, and Talmud of late Antiquity. Medieval Hebrew genres include the theological and erotic poetry of Spain and Italy, the laments of the Crusades, the travelogue, ethical fables, philosophical essays, and Messianic folklore. Courses listed under Hebrew 62 are open to students of all classes.

Midrash: How the Rabbis Interpreted the Bible (Identical to Jewish Studies 24.3). Midrash is the ancient Jewish term for Biblical interpretation. We examine how the Bible was interpreted by the Rabbis 1500 to 2000 years ago, at the crucial juncture in history when the Bible was being canonized in the form it now has. We focus on powerful motifs such as Creation, the Flood, Jacob and Esau, the Sacrifice of Isaac, and the Exodus, and view them through two prisms: through a wide range of ancient Midrashic texts themselves; and through one influential modern Jewish literary reading of the Midrashic themes of Genesis. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Glinert.

63. Themes in Hebrew Literature and Culture

12S, 13S: 2A

Committed to tradition but irresistibly changing, Hebrew literature across the centuries has created a delicate set of modulations on major themes, which may be deemed leitmotifs of Jewish culture and which continue to surface even in secular Israel. Among them are love and the mystical eros, holy land and holy people, the sacrifice of Isaac and martyrdom, exile and the messiah. Courses listed under Hebrew 63 are open to students of all classes.

Rabbis, Rogues, and Schlemiels: Jewish Humor and its Roots (Identical to Jewish Studies 24.2). What is Jewish humor, what are its roots, and what can it begin to tell us about Jewish society, its values and its self-image? Using Freudian and other humor theory, we examine 2000 years of Hebrew comedy and satire, from the Bible to contemporary Israel, in such genres as short stories, jokes, and strip cartoons, and its relationship to American Jewish humor. Dist: LIT. WCult: W. Glinert.

Courses numbered 81 or above are advanced seminar courses.

81. Topics in Hebrew Literature and Culture

Not offered in the period from 11F through 13S

JAPANESE LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

1-2-3. First-Year Courses in Japanese

1. 11F, 12F: 9S, 9S

2. 12W, 13W: 9S, 9S

3. 12S, 13S: 9S, 9S

An introduction to written and spoken modern Japanese. In addition to mastering the basics of grammar, emphasis is placed on active functional communication in the language, reading comprehension, and listening comprehension. Conversational drill and comprehensive exercises in classroom and laboratory provide practice in pronunciation and the use of the basic patterns of speech. Classes are conducted in Japanese. Reading in simple materials is extensive. Mandatory student-run drill sessions meet four times a week for fifty minutes for all beginning Japanese language classes. Never serve in partial satisfaction of Distributive or World Culture requirements. Ishida, Watanabe.

10. Introduction to Japanese Culture (Identical to AMES 13)

12S, 13S: 11

Japanese cultural history through a broad survey of literature, art, social and political institutions, and popular culture. Modern conceptions of Japan and formations of Japanese identity have evolved under the pressures created by radical swings between periods of wholesale appropriation of foreign cultural forms and periods of extreme isolation. The course will trace the evolution of Japanese culture by examining the ways in which cultural archetypes are distinguished in Japan. Taught in English. Open to all classes. Required for the LSA+, major and minor. Dist: LIT; WCult: CI. Washburn, Dorsey.

11. Special Topics in Japanese Studies

12X, 13X: D.L.S.A.+ (Dartmouth in Japan)

WCult: NW. The staff.

22, 23. Intermediate Modern Japanese

12X, 13X: D.L.S.A.+ (Dartmouth in Japan)

A continuation of the fundamentals of grammar and further acquisition of spoken communication skills, aural comprehension, and proficiency in reading and writing. This is an intensive course that integrates homestays and the local environment into course materials. Students will be expected to master a wide variety of reading and video materials. WCult: NW. The staff.

31. Advanced Japanese

11F, 12F: 11

A progression of materials from Japanese 23. Intensive review and continued study of modern Japanese at the advanced level. Conversation skills will continue to be an important aspect of this course, but more emphasis will be placed on reading and writing skills. Reading materials will be drawn from current newspapers, contemporary fiction, essays from journals, and excerpts from poetry. Short audiovisual selections will be used as well. Assigned work includes written compositions and oral presentations.

Prerequisite: Japanese 23 or permission of instructor. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Ishida.

32. Advanced Japanese

12W, 13W: 11

A progression of materials from Japanese 31. A variation of materials used in Japanese 31. Note: Although the materials used in this course differ from the materials used in Japanese 31, the general level of proficiency required to enroll in either Japanese 31 or 32 is roughly equivalent. Students may take Japanese 32 even if they have been unable to enroll in Japanese 31.

Prerequisite: Japanese 31 or permission of instructor. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Dorsey, Watanabe.

33. Advanced Japanese

12S, 13S: 11

A continuation and progression of materials used in Japanese 31 and 32. Note: the level of proficiency required to enroll in Japanese 33 is higher than the proficiency required for either Japanese 31 or 32.

Prerequisite: Japanese 32 or permission of instructor. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Ishida.

41. Advanced Japanese

11F, 12F: 11

A variation of materials used in Japanese 33. Note: although the materials used in this course differ from the materials used in Japanese 33, the general level of proficiency required to enroll in either Japanese 33 or 41 is roughly equivalent. Students may take Japanese 41 even if they have been unable to enroll in Japanese 33.

Prerequisite: Two third-year level Japanese courses, or permission of the instructor. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Watanabe.

42. Advanced Japanese

12W, 13W: 11

A progression of materials from Japanese 41. Designed to develop mastery of the spoken and written language. Assigned work includes written compositions and oral presentations.

Prerequisite: Japanese 41 or permission of the instructor. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Watanabe, Ishida.

43. Advanced Japanese

Not offered in the period from 11F through 13S

Prerequisite: Japanese 41 or 42, or permission of the instructor. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. The staff.

59. Independent Advanced Study in Japanese Language and Literature

All terms except summer: Arrange

Available to students who wish to do advanced or independent study in Japanese. The student must first submit a proposal to the Major/Minor advisor, and the section faculty, before obtaining permission from the faculty member with whom he or she wishes to work. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Dorsey, Washburn.

Courses numbered 61 - 63 are literature-in-translation courses, not requiring Japanese.

61. Topics in 20th Century Japanese Literature and Culture

12W: 10A

Classes offered under this rubric deal with major figures, themes, or issues of twentieth-century Japanese literature, popular culture, and intellectual history. Techniques of critical reading and interpretation are studied as an integral part of these courses, which reflect the interests and expertise of the teaching staff. Since each offering is based on a particular theme or period, students may take this course more than once. Courses listed under Japanese 61 are open to students of all classes.

The Art of War: Stories, Paintings, Films, and Propaganda from Japan’s Modern Wars. In this course we will examine the relationship between a wide variety of cultural artifacts and modern Japan’s experience of war, particularly WW II. Topics addressed within this context include: government censorship, literary subversion, popular culture versus high culture, visual versus written media, postwar cultural memory, the ideology of suicide squads, and the mentality of victimhood. No Japanese language is required for the course, but students with sufficient ability will be expected to make use of original sources. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Dorsey.

62. Topics in Early Modern Japanese Literature and Culture

Not offered in the period from 11F through 13S

Classes offered under this rubric explore the emergence of modern Japan between the years 1600 and 1900 through an examination of literature, popular culture, and intellectual history. Techniques of critical reading and interpretation are studied as an integral part of these courses, which reflect the interests and expertise of the teaching staff. Since each offering is based on a particular theme or period, students may take this course more than once. Courses listed under Japanese 62 are open to students of all classes.

63. Topics in Classical Japanese Literature and Culture

Not offered in the period from 11F through 13S

Classes offered under this rubric will explore key developments in the cultural history of Japan between the years 700 and 1600 through a close examination of literary artifacts. Techniques of critical reading and interpretation are studied as an integral part of these courses, which reflect the interests and expertise of the teaching staff. Since each offering is based on a particular theme or period, students may take this course more than once. Courses listed under Japanese 63 are open to students of all classes.

Courses numbered 81 or above are advanced seminar courses.

81. Topics in Japanese Literature and Culture

11F: 10A

This seminar is designed to examine closely literary and cultural texts employing theoretical and historical sources. Topics vary according to instructor, but might range from studies of single authors to broader comparative themes, where students will be urged to incorporate readings in the original language.

Tokyo as an Idea: Race, Empire, and the Modern Metropolis. The dramatic rise of Edo, the shogun’s capital, and its later transformation into the imperial capital called Tokyo mirrors the extraordinary history of modern Japan as a whole. We will examine the place that Edo/Tokyo has held in the cultural imagination of Japanese writers, artists, and intellectuals, and the role the metropolis plays as a major center of global culture. We will look at various sources and materials—prints, photographs, and maps; literary works; historical and architectural writings; advertisements, film, and television -- to trace the development of Tokyo as an idea within a comparative framework that considers other major urban centers such as Paris, New York, and Shanghai. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Washburn.