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Theater

Chair: T. Peter Hackett

Professors T. P. Hackett, M. E. Spicer; Associate Professors J. M. Horton, D. Kotlowitz, M. B. Sabinson; Assistant Professor L. Edmondson; Senior Lecturer J. G. Rice; Lecturers K. M. Cunneen, C. Dunne; Visiting Professors G. Alexi-Meskhishvili, A. Winograd, J. Zaks; Visiting Associate Professors R. Stewart, J. D. Sutton; Visiting Assistant Professor F. Minwalla; Adjunct Professor T. F. Evans; Adjunct Assistant Professor S. L. Silver.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR

The Theater program at Dartmouth College combines courses in the history, theory, and criticism of theater as a performing art with courses in theater practice. Because of the wide range of interests encompassed in the study of theater, students' programs for the major include a core of foundation courses in the history, literature and criticism of theater plus a combination of courses individually selected to provide training in several aspects of theater practice with special emphasis in one such area. Proposed programs must be supported by a written rationale to be submitted and approved by the student's Theater advisor. This rationale and the major cards are then submitted to the Department Chair. Students may concentrate their studies in such areas as Acting and Directing; Dance; Theatrical Design and Technical Production; Playwriting; Dramaturgy; History, Theory, and Criticism of Theater.

Prerequisites:

Theater 1: Introduction to Theater Studies: How Performance Happens

Theater 15: World Theater History I: Classical and Medieval Theater

Theater 16: World Theater History II: Early Modern Theater

Theater 40: Technical Production

Prerequisite courses should normally be completed by the end of the sophomore year. Students who become majors after the sophomore year should enroll for the prerequisite courses during the first terms in which they are available after the major has been declared.

Requirements:

Nine major courses, exclusive of the prerequisites, as enumerated within the following categories:

A. Four courses in dramatic literature, theater history, theory and criticism, no more than one of which can be taken outside of the Theater Department.

(1) Two of the following courses:

Theater 18: Modern Drama I

Theater 63: Dramatic Theory and Criticism

English 24: Shakespeare I

Theater 17: History of British Theater and Drama (FSP)

Theater 19: Modern Drama II

Theater 20: Topics in Modern and Contemporary Western Theater

English 26: English Drama to 1642

English 54: Modern British Drama

(2) Two of the following courses:

Theater 21: Topics in American Theater

Theater 22: Black Theater, U.S.A.

Theater 23: African Theater: From Colonialism to the Present

Theater 24: Performance in Asia

English 47: American Drama

Theater 10: Special Topics in Theater (with the approval of the Chair)

Or any course listed above in categories 1-2.

With prior approval of the Chair, a course in theater studies from another department (in dramatic literature, theater history, or theater theory and criticism) may be used to fulfill this category (e.g. Classical Studies 2: The Tragedy and Comedy of Greece and Rome).

B. Five courses in theater practice:

(6), (7), (8), (9), (10) An organized, coherent program of five courses supported by the major, written rationale, and approved by the Chair of the Department. Majors are required to take at least one of the performance courses (27, 29, 30, 36, 38, 54, or 10 upon approval) and one of the design courses (42, 44, 45, 48, and 10 upon approval). Theater 41, 50, and 90 may be used in partial fulfillment of this requirement.

C. Production requirement:

Every Theater major is expected to demonstrate competence in the area of theater production by active and sustained participation in theater offerings at the Hopkins Center (or elsewhere as approved by the Department), especially during the period of his or her declared major. Active and sustained participation shall consist of at least five active involvements in productions sponsored (or with approval, cosponsored) by the Department over a minimum of three terms. Each production credit must include a minimum of 25 hours of work. Production credits must reflect a variety of theater activity, only two of which may be in acting. With Department approval work-study hours may, in some cases, count toward the fulfillment of the requirement. Participation may include any form of activity with the exception of work associated with the prerequisite course Theater 40: Technical Production.

a. courses that include a production component

b. acting in productions

c. participation in a production crew

d. stage management

e. directing

f. designing

g. playwriting when the script is produced under the sponsorship of the Department

h. dramaturgy under faculty supervision.

D. The Culminating Experience. See explanation below.

MODIFIED MAJOR IN THEATER

A student who wishes to combine the study of theater with a related field may apply to the Department for a modified major. Such a program shall contain five courses from the theater major beyond the prerequisites (Theater 1, 15, 16 and 40) and four courses that count toward the major(s) in the related department(s) or program(s). Majors are required to take at least one of the performance courses (27, 29, 30, 36, 38, 54, or 10 upon approval) and one of the design courses (42, 44, 45, 48, or 10 upon approval). Theater 41, 50, and 90 may also be used in partial fulfillment of this requirement. Students taking a modified major must fulfill a production requirement of participation in three productions, at least one of which must be in an area other than acting (please see "Production requirement" for specifics). The Culminating Experience in Theater must also be completed. In recent years modified majors in Theater have been formed with Art History, Classics, English, Film Studies, French, Music, and Spanish. The program must receive the prior approval of the Chair of the Theater Department.

MINOR IN THEATER

The requirements for a Theater minor are six courses that include any prerequisite to the major (Theater 1, 15, 16, or 40). These six courses shall include no more than one Theater 80 and no more than two courses outside of the Department that would normally be accepted for the major. There will be two production requirements, at least one of which must be in an area other than acting (please see "Production requirement" for specifics). A written rationale must be submitted by the student and approved by the Chair.

THE CULMINATING EXPERIENCE

All Theater majors and modified Theater majors must complete a Culminating Experience in Theater. (Theater minors, and other majors modifying with Theater will complete their Culminating Experience in their primary departments. Double majors must complete Culminating Experiences in both majors.) Normally the Culminating Experience is undertaken during the senior year.

In Theater, the Culminating Experience has two components:

1) Participation in Theater 90: The Senior Seminar. All seniors are required to enroll in the Senior Seminar. The Seminar will meet once a week, and will consist of visits by guest artists and critics, discussion and development of student culminating project proposals, critiques of student work, and, where practical, trips to theaters and other locations of interest to the seminar.

2) A Culminating Activity. The culminating activity consists of at least one collaborative project. All majors will work on the culminating activity together, and will present their work in the spring term of the senior year. The project(s) will consist of a major piece of work in the area of each student's concentration or primary interest, such as acting, directing, dance, design, technical production, costume production, stage management, playwriting, theater history, dramatic criticism, etc.

Majors are urged to plan ahead and to discuss their areas of anticipated concentration with the Department Chair and potential faculty advisors in advance. The culminating experience project(s) will be discussed and developed in Theater 90: The Senior Seminar. Senior majors will submit a proposal(s) for the culminating project(s) by the end of winter term.

The culminating experience requirements may also be fulfilled through the Honors Program (as currently described in the ORC).

TRANSFER CREDIT

Every course taken for transfer credit in Theater must be approved prior to enrollment by the Chair of the Department, upon review of a detailed course description. Three courses taken at other institutions may be substituted in fulfillment of the major requirements, provided that the courses are equivalent to department courses and the program as a whole is consistent with the intent of the major. Of the three transferred courses, no more than two may be in dramatic literature, history, and criticism (A, above): no more than two courses may be in theater practice (B, above).

HONORS PROGRAM

Students who have completed at least five major courses and who have an average in the major of 3.4 or higher (and a college average of 3.0 or higher) are eligible to apply for the Honors Program. Students with modified as well as standard majors may apply. Honors proposals must include the signature of the faculty advisor(s) before submission to the department for consideration. The member(s) of the Theater Department who will supervise the program will be chosen or confirmed at the time that the proposal is approved. The Honors Program consists of a one-term course of study in the spring, completed in the class context of Theater 90: The Senior Seminar and the Culminating Activity. All eligible senior majors will be notified in writing during the winter term of the deadlines for submissions of the Honors proposal.

FOREIGN STUDY PROGRAM

England: London. Fall (alternate years: 2008, 2010)

The Theater Foreign Study Program offers students the opportunity to combine historical study and professional practice in theater at the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art, one of the world's great conservatories. The program is a unique chance for students to develop their craft while taking advantage of London's incomparable theatrical tradition and vibrant cultural scene. The course in British Theater History (Theater 17) explores the development of playhouses, stage design, acting companies, and major plays. Emphasis is on the 17th to 20th centuries. Theater 62: Plays in Performance-Perception and Analysis, taught by the Dartmouth instructor involves attending an average of two to three productions per week and a weekly seminar. For the third course, students select - according to interests and preparation - one of the following: (1) Theater 33: Acting IV, an advanced course emphasizing Shakespeare. (2) Theater 52: Playwriting III (3) Theater 80: Independent Study in Theater Research or Criticism, Directing, Design or Stage Management (arranged by LAMDA and supervised by a Dartmouth instructor).

In addition to the many London theaters, including the Royal Shakespeare Company and National Theatre, students will have full access to London's cultural resources in music, dance, film, and museums. When practical, field trips to historical sites of theatrical interest and backstage tours of theater facilities will be scheduled.

For additional information regarding enrollment and prerequisites, please consult the Off-Campus Academic Programs booklet.

COURSES

1. Introduction to Theater Studies: How Performance Happens

07W, 08W: 10A

Plays are written to be performed. Reading and analyzing them is different from reading novels or poems. Watching them performed is different from watching films or dance. Students will explore the collaborative process of the theater event through sessions with actors, directors, designers and dramaturgs. We will ask: how are plays structured? how do plays become performances? how shall we look at work that is non-scripted, grounded in improvisation, ritual or the display of specific skills? how does performance participate in culture? what is theatricality? Dist: ART. Winograd and the staff.

7. First-Year Seminars in Theater

Consult special listings

10. Special Topics in Theater

06F: 2A 07W: 2 07S: 10, 10A, 2, 2A, 3A

In 06F at 2A, Human Rights and Performance. This course explores performance texts and theater scholarship that engage with the discourse of human rights. The course examines various case studies of state-sanctioned violations of human rights and how theater and performance artists have responded to those violations. In addition to a series of short response essays, each student will develop an independent research project throughout the term. Dist: ART. Edmondson.

In 07W at 2, Newspaper Theater. This course will examine the history and practice of "Newspaper Theater" and provide students an opportunity to transform current events and contemporary news analysis into lively topical theater. Class assignments will include weekly exercises based on national and international news events, background and historical research, script development, performance, as well as attendance at various local events.

Class limit: 16. By permission of the instructor. Sabinson.

In 07S at 2A (Section 1), Directing II. An advanced course in directing for the stage. Topics include basic skills for collaborating with scenic, costume, lighting and sound designers; techniques for staging plays in the proscenium, thrust and round environments; approaches to partnering with playwrights on creating new works.

Prerequisite: Theater 54. Hackett.

In 07S at 2 (Section 2), Cabaret. This course will investigate both the history and practice of the vital theatrical form known as Cabaret from its birth in 1880's Paris to its contemporary performance venues. Students will read performance texts and histories, research particular movements, and create an original Cabaret performance.

Class limit: 16. By permission of the instructor. Sabinson.

In 07S at 10A (Section 3), Voice II: Speaking Shakespeare. Utilizing the progression of exercises developed by Kristin Linklater (known as Freeing the Natural Voice) the course will extensively utilize the language of Shakespeare in sonnets, monologues and scenes to free and strengthen the speaking voice of the stage actor. An essential course for the serious actor, it is also a course for anyone eager to explore the ideal medium Shakespeare provides for deepening in one's speaking capabilities, development of confidence, poise, and fearlessness. Students will be responsible for preparing material for spoken presentation, maintaining an observational journal, and attending scheduled tutorials or rehearsals with the instructor. Enrollment by permission of instructor. Rice.

In 07S at 3A (Section 4), Acting Comedy with Jerry Zaks. An advanced acting and directing class focusing on the skills necessary for effectively performing classic and contemporary comedy. Students will rehearse and present scenes from a variety of comic plays. The workshop will be led by four time Tony Award-winning director and Dartmouth alumnus, Jerry Zaks.

Prerequisites: Theater 31 or Theater 54 and permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 14. Zaks.

In 07S at 10 (Section 5), African Theater. This course introduces the student to the diversity of sub-Saharan African theater and performance. Through an exploration of performance traditions, written plays, and the popular arts, the course addresses the cultural and political complexities of this troubled but vibrant continent. In addition to a series of short response essays, each student will develop an independent research project throughout the term. Edmondson.

15. World Theater History I: Classical and Medieval Theater

07W, 08W: 2

This course explores the dramatic literature as performed on Greek, Roman, classical Asian, and medieval European stages. Themes include the intersection of religion and performance, the spectacle of power, and the dynamics of spectatorship. Although the course seeks to familiarize the student with theater spaces, conventions, theories, and performers, the primary focus is on the practice of theater in the classical and medieval period.

Open to all classes. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. WCult: W. Edmondson.

16. World Theater History II: Early Modern Theater

07S, 08S: 2

This course explores the dynamic developments in world theater during the early modern period (fourteenth through the eighteenth centuries). This rich period includes English Elizabethan, Jacobean and Restoration Drama; Japanese Noh, Bunraku and Kabuki; the Spanish Golden Age; French neoclassical drama; and the domestication of commedia dell'arte. German romanticism and early American drama will also be addressed. As in World Theater History I, the course focuses on performance as contextualized in the cultural politics and theatrical conventions of the period.

Open to all classes. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. WCult: W. Edmondson.

17. History of British Theater and Drama

08F: D.F.S.P.

A study of the cultural and physical forms of British theater, accompanied by the reading and discussion of major plays from the periods considered. Offered only as a part of the Theater Foreign Study Program in London. Emphasis will be given to the drama and theaters of the mid-17th to early 20th centuries. However, some attention will also be given to Shakespeare, and the chronological boundaries of the course will be adjusted to include historically significant plays that can be seen in production during the term in which the course is offered. Representative continental influences will be considered on occasion (for example, plays by Corneille, Racine and Moliere). Some knowledge of English Renaissance theater and drama is expected.

Prerequisite: Theater 1 and at least one of Theater 15, Theater 16 or English 24. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. The staff.

18. Modern Drama I (Identical to Comparative Literature 33)

06F, 07F: 10A

Major international plays of classic modernism will be set in the context of the art movement of the early 20th century. We will study the theatrical qualities of the modern theater text and the nature of the characters which govern its action in the works of Ibsen, Strindberg and Chekhov, Buchner and Brecht, O'Neill, Williams and Miller. The impulsive, irrational texts of Futurism, Expressionism, Dada and Surrealism will also be considered. Videotapes will accompany class lectures and discussion.

Open to all classes. Dist: ART or INT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Winograd.

19. Modern Drama II

07W: 2A

This course will investigate the nature of performance at the end of the 20th century. It will focus on the processes of making performance, the negotiation between traditional theater text/practice and the avant-garde, the shared concerns of performance and visual artists (happenings, performance art), and the social and/or political purposes of performance. Readings will include key critical and theoretical texts in theatre and such fields as post-modernism, gender studies, and feminist criticism. Performance work will be viewed live and/or on video.

Open to all classes. Dist: ART or INT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU or NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Winograd.

20. Topics in Modern and Contemporary Western Theater

Not offered in the period from 06F through 07S

This course will examine the sources, purposes, theories, and techniques of modern and contemporary (19th-21st centuries) theater practice in the Western World. Resources will include play texts, critical writings, and visual materials. Open to all classes. Dist: ART.

21. Topics in American Theater

Not offered in the period from 06F through 07S

This course will focus on a single figure, a group of related figures, a period, genre, or theme from the history of the American theater. A detailed exploration of relevant plays, notable performers and productions, stage designs, theater companies and the performance spaces in which they evolved, and their social context. Resources will include play texts, contemporary reviews and descriptions, critical responses, and visual materials.

Open to all classes. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W.

22. Black Theater, U.S.A. (Identical to African and African American Studies 31)

Not offered in 2006-2007, may be offered in 2007-2008

This course will examine African American playwrights, drama, and theater from the 1960s to the 21st century. Further exploration will focus on the impact of civil rights, the Black Arts movement, and cultural aesthetics on the form, style, and content of African American plays. Critical works in the theories of Black theatrical praxis and textual analysis will be read to facilitate class discussions concerning theme, plot, ritual, polemics, etc. The course will also explore artists, individuals, and institutions that helped spawn the growth of African American theater and drama over the last four decades. Readings will include plays of Lorraine Hansberry, Amiri Baraka (LeRoi Jones), Adrienne Kennedy, Douglas Turner Ward, Alice Childress, Charles Fuller, Ntozake Shange, George Wolfe, Elaine Jackson, August Wilson, Anna Deavere Smith and others.

Open to all classes. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W.

24. Performance in Asia

Not offered in the period from 06F through 07S

This course will survey the major classical theatre of Asia. We will explore the development of such different traditions as the Japanese Noh and Kabuki, Classical Chinese drama and opera, Sanskrit drama, and the puppet theatres of Southeast Asia. Some attention will be paid to the performance traditions within which these works evolved, and to the way they are received today.

Open to all classes. Dist: ART; WCult: NW.

27. Dance Studies I

06F: 2A

An introduction to dance as a performing art through study of modern dance history, technique, improvisation, and the elements of dance composition. This course will animate the intersection of dance history, movement theory, and practice through the creative process. Movement will be a catalyst to explore individual expression while studying traditional and contemporary dance techniques, i.e., modern dance, ballet, and improvisation. Readings, written work, dance concert attendance, and video showings will be required as specified in the syllabus.

Enrollment limited. Dist: ART. Evans.

28. Dance Studies II

07W: 2A

An in-depth study of the principles of dance composition leading to choreographic projects. Students will receive training in both dance composition and criticism, developing the fundamental tools for choreography while acquiring the vocabulary for sophisticated choreographic analysis. Reading and writing assignments on contemporary issues in dance will be the departure for student's theoretical and creative exploration. To this end the class will concentrate on individual student work and the development of movement style and choreographic expression. Class work will culminate in an informal showing at the conclusion of the term.

Prerequisites: Dance Studies I and/or permission of the instructor. Dist: ART. Evans.

29. Dance Studies in Performance

06F: 2A

Emphasis will be placed on advanced technical training in dance studies, development of mature rehearsal skills and achievement of individual performance goals, culminating in an annual dance concert. This course consists of two dance technique classes per week and daily rehearsals Monday through Friday. In addition, students will have the opportunity to study and work with innovative and cutting-edge guest choreographers during their residencies on campus.

One course credit is offered for three consecutive and combined terms of participation in Theater 29 and will be granted only after successful completion of all three terms of study. The course is included as part of a student's official course load only in the first term (fall); a grade is given upon completion of the final term (spring). A student who does not complete the course will receive a non-credit grade. Up to three course credits for Theater 29 may be counted toward the Dartmouth degree. Open to all classes, with instructor's permission. Dist: ART. Evans.

30. Acting I

06F: 10A, 2A 07W: 2A

Basic introduction to acting technique for the stage. Designed to develop ability to play dramatic action honestly and believably, using realistic/naturalistic material as well as self-scripted autobiographical writing. Course work includes exercises and improvisations exploring awareness, relaxation, observation, the senses, voice, and physical and emotional life. Work in preparation of the monologue will be introduced. Scene work, in the second half of the term, will focus on breaking down the play, analysis, identity, motivation and action. Out-of-class assignments include required readings from acting texts and plays. Attendance at, as well as responses to, a number of stage productions scheduled during the term is required. A commitment to regular journal writing in the form of an Observation Notebook will be expected.

Open to all classes, with instructor's permission. Do not pre-register for this course: registration is invalid without permission from the instructor. To enroll in this course you must first interview with the instructor. Interviews are conducted on the first day of classes. A sign-up sheet for interviews will be posted in Shakespeare Alley the day before classes begin. Dist: ART. Rice, Dunne.

31. Acting II

07W, 07S: 2A

Further study of acting technique for the stage. Course work includes continued exercises, improvisations, and naturalistic/realistic scene study. Out-of-class assignments include the reading of plays and theoretical works on acting technique; required attendance at area stage productions; analytic and critical writing assignments; scene preparation, investigations, and rehearsal; and an extensive acting journal of work done in and out of class.

Prerequisite: Theater 30 and permission of the instructor. Dist: ART. Rice (07W), Horton (07S).

32. Acting III

Not offered in the period from 06F through 07S

Beyond the material covered in the previous term, considerations of style and work on period plays are introduced. Scene study is done in greater depth, and improvisational work focuses on real-world events from newspapers and/or other relevant sources. Out-of-class assignments include the reading of plays and theoretical works on acting technique; required attendance at area stage productions; analytic, critical, and creative writing assignments; scene preparation, investigations, and rehearsal; and an in-depth journal of work done in and out of class.

Prerequisites: Theater 30, 31 and permission of the instructor. The department recommends that Acting III should be taken in the term following Acting II. Dist: ART.

33. Acting IV

08F: D.F.S.P.

For advanced students of acting, this course will provide training and exercises in the performance of classical British drama. Study will include comprehension and interpretation of texts, voice, movement, characterization, stylistic approaches, and work with monologues and scenes. The course will emphasize historical texts: Shakespeare and Renaissance drama. However, study may also, at times, include work with "mannered" or "high" comedy of later periods (for example, plays by Wilde, Shaw, Pinter). Instruction by performers experienced in classical acting. Normally offered only as part of the Theater Foreign Study Program in London.

Prerequisites: Theater 30, 31, and 32, or the equivalent. Dist: ART. The staff.

34. Acting for the Camera

Not offered in the period from 06F through 07S

Introduction to acting technique for the camera. Designed to develop ability to play dramatic action honestly and believably, taking into consideration the presence and role of the camera. Using naturalistic contemporary film scripts, course work includes exercises and improvisations, both on and off camera, focused on relaxation, concentration, and imagination, as well as scene work focused on text analysis, motivation, action, and character development. Out-of-class assignments include readings from texts, scripts, and articles; required attendance at area film showings; analytic and critical writing assignments; scene preparation, rehearsals and location shooting. Several class exercises and assignments will be done in conjunction with film studies students enrolled in Film Studies 37: Directing for the Camera.

Open to all classes, with instructor's permission. Permission to enroll will be given based on an interview with the instructor. Dist: ART.

36. The Speaking Voice for the Stage

07W, 08W: 10A

This course is an examination of the principles and practice of freeing the natural voice. It proceeds from the notion that "voice" and "acting" are inseparable. Although it is an introduction to the use of voice in the theater, it is in no way limited to the actor. A specific progression of exercises will be presented to facilitate freeing the body of tensions, discovering the natural breath, releasing vibrations of sound from the body, and opening the channel for sound (throat, jaw, tongue). Resonance, vocal freedom, and articulation will also be explored. Techniques for accessing emotional and psychological truth will be practiced as fundamental to the actor's creative process. A groundwork will be laid for physical and vocal presence. Each student will be responsible for the development and practice of a vocal warm-up. A variety of speaking assignments will be made to develop confidence, presence and emotional expressivity. Text materials utilized will emerge from self-scripted autobiographical storytelling. A strong commitment to the work is necessary to explore what it means to find one's voice.

Do not pre-register for this course: registration is invalid without permission from the instructor. To enroll in this course you must first interview with the instructor. Interviews are conducted on the first day of classes. A sign-up sheet for interviews will be posted in Shakespeare Alley the day before classes begin.

Open to all classes, with instructor's permission. Dist: ART. Rice.

38. Movement for Actors I

07W: 2A

An introduction to dramatic movement for the stage. Using physical language we will explore technique, improvisations, repertoire, and composition. Students will work on solos, duets and in groups with text, objects, and music. Assignments will include classroom presentations, readings, and papers. Videotapes will be reviewed and discussed.

Open to all classes. Dist: ART. Stewart.

39. Movement for Actors II

07S: 2A

A more advanced exploration of both creative and technical movement for the actor. Alignment, body conditioning, contact improvisation, movement composition, and the analysis of significant recorded movement based theater works are covered. There will be specific written assignments, critiques, and a final paper. Individual exploration in movement concepts is encouraged. No previous training is required.

Prerequisite: Theater 38. Dist: ART. Stewart.

40. Technical Production

06F, 07W, 07F, 08W: 10

An introduction to the technical aspects of scenic and property production, exploring traditional and modern approaches. Topics include drafting, materials and construction, stage equipment, rigging, and health and safety. Lectures and production projects.

Open to all classes, with instructor's permission. Dist: ART. Silver.

41. Stage Management

06F, 07F: 10A

An introductory course in the theories, techniques, and practices of stage managing a production from its initial stages to the conclusion of the run. Plays, musicals, opera, dance, and touring productions will be examined from the perspective of the stage manager. Working with directors, choreographers, and other members of the production team will be discussed as well as calling shows. Students will acquire practical experience through assignments on Department of Theater productions. When practical, field trips to such places as Yale Repertory Theatre, Long Wharf Theatre, or American Repertory Theatre will be arranged and will include discussions by their production stage managers.

Open to all classes, with instructor's permission. Dist: ART. Cunneen.

42. Scene Design I

07W, 08W: 3A

An introduction to the basics of scenic design through weekly projects in scale models, drawings, research, lighting and storyboards. Students will also study the collaborative process between scene designers, directors, costume and lighting designers. Suitable for students interested in theater, visual and video art, installation, film, architecture, and sculpture. Students will have the opportunity to assist student and faculty scene designers on Department of Theater productions.

Open to all classes. Dist: ART. Alexi-Meskhishvili.

43. Scene Design II

07S, 08S: 3A

Further study of the design process and the creation of visual expressions of dramatic text. Emphasis will be placed on the difference between theater, opera and ballet. Students will work with scale color models and have opportunities to design student directed department productions.

Prerequisite: Theater 42, or permission of the instructor. Dist: ART. Alexi-Meskhishvili.

44. Lighting Design I

07W, 08W: 11

An introduction to the practical and artistic elements of theatrical lighting design. The course will include topics in color theory, form, movement, composition, and the creative process. Through analyzing the script and studying light in nature, film, and art, students will prepare projects that explore the possibilities of light in the theater. Students will have the opportunity to work on Theater Department productions with faculty and student lighting designers. Lectures, discussions, design projects, and critiques.

Open to all classes. Dist: ART. Kotlowitz.

45. Composition and Design

06F, 07F: 11

Composition and Design is a study of visual composition and how it can be used to communicate ideas in the theater. This class is designed for anyone who is interested in visual composition-as a designer, director, actor, artist or audience member. It will cover the process of taking a concept, a thought, a story, a mood, or an emotion and transforming it into a visual idea. Students will create compositions using collages and all the elements of the theater- actors, scenery, costumes, lights, and sound. Projects will explore artistic expression, communication and collaboration while examining how we perceive the visual world and how, as theater artists, we can manipulate that perception. Investigations may incorporate painting, sculpture, music, poetry, photography, film, dance and theatre. Emphasis will be placed on student projects and critiques.

Open to all classes. Dist: ART. Kotlowitz.

46. Costume Production

Not offered in the period from 06F through 07S

A study of the technical aspects of costume production, including construction, draping, drafting, and the use of fabrics and materials. The course will consider the historical and modern solutions to the problems of costume construction and production. Lectures, projects, and critiques.

Open to all classes, with instructor's permission. Dist: ART. Spicer.

48. Costume Design I

07W, 07F, 08S: 11

An introductory course in the appreciation of the costume design process as part of the dramatic production. Through weekly projects students will study the principles of line, texture, and color as well as the history of costume from the Renaissance through the Eighteenth century. Lectures, design projects, and critiques.

Open to all classes, with instructor's permission. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Spicer.

50. Playwriting I

06F, 07S: 3A

The aim of the course is for each student to write the best one-act play he or she is capable of writing. This undertaking will involve a number of preliminary exercises, the preparation of a scenario, the development of the material through individual conferences, and finally the reading and discussion of the student's work in seminar sessions.

Open to all classes. The course is limited in size and requires the permission of the instructor. Students will not be enrolled until after an interview with the instructor. Preregistration is not permitted. Dist: ART. Sutton.

51. Playwriting II

07S: Arrange

Permission of the instructor is required. Dist. ART. Sutton.

52. Playwriting III

08F: D.F.S.P.

Students will have the opportunity to work one-on-one with a professional playwright at the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art to develop a full-length script, normally a project already in progress. Students will also participate in critical evaluation of new plays produced in London. If possible, students' work will receive a reading as part of the final project.

Prerequisites: Theater 50 and 51, or permission of the instructor. Dist: ART. The staff.

54. Directing

06F, 07F: 2A

An introductory course in directing for the stage. Topics include the role and function of the director in the contemporary theater; the basic tools of proscenium blocking and staging such as composition, picturization, movement, and gesture; structural script analysis; and basic actor coaching techniques.

Prerequisites: Theater 30 and permission of the instructor. Dist: ART. Horton.

62. Plays in Performance - Perception and Analysis

08F: D.F.S.P.

Offered only as a part of the Theater Foreign Study Program in London, this seminar will integrate the study of theater with the experience of plays in performance. By providing intense, comparative experience of playgoing, the course intends to broaden students' knowledge of the dramatic repertoire, to heighten their awareness of production approaches and values, and to encourage them to develop considered critical response to theater. Students will attend a number of required performances and in addition attend performances of their own choosing - normally a total of three plays per week. Productions will represent a variety of periods and styles of playwriting, and a similarly diverse range of production companies and approaches to performance. Weekly seminar meetings will focus on critical responses to plays and productions, with background provided by guests from the professional theater (directors, writers, performers, designers, critics). Students will maintain journals and provide brief written critiques.

Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. The staff.

63. Dramatic Theory and Criticism

Not offered in the period from 06F through 07S

This course will examine a broad range of philosophical/aesthetic ideas related to the nature of drama and performance, both scripted and non-scripted. We will explore such topics as storytelling, oral tradition, ritual, comedy, and tragedy, with critical readings drawn from the Classical period; Renaissance; 18th and 19th centuries; and post-structuralist, postmodern, feminist, post-colonial, and queer criticisms. Critical readings will be supplemented with plays whenever possible.

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Dist: ART. The staff.

65. Drama in Performance

07X: 2A

An intensive study of a selected playwright or playwrights, genre, period or topic, and development of one text through the rehearsal process into performance on the stage.

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Dist: ART. Hackett.

80. Independent Study

06F, 07W, 07S, 07X: Arrange

This course is designed to enable qualified upperclass students, who have completed the appropriate supporting course work, to engage in independent study in theater under the direction of a member of the Department. A student should consult with the faculty member with whom he or she wishes to work as far in advance as possible, and not later than the term immediately preceding the term in which the independent study is to be pursued.

A written proposal and the approval of the faculty member and of the Chair is required.

90. Senior Seminar

07W: Arrange

A weekly seminar, conducted as part of the Culminating Experience. Visits by guest artists and critics, discussion and development of student culminating project proposals, critiques of student work, and, where practical, trips to theaters and other locations of interest to the Seminar. Attendance in the seminar and participation in the trips is required of all senior theater majors (standard or modified). Enrollment in Theater 90: The Senior Seminar is required of all majors. May be counted as one of the five courses in theater practice.

Permission of the instructor is required. Dist: ART. Stewart.