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Information on this website is posted for historical reference only. Please visit the Office of the Registrar for current requirements.

Psychological and Brain Sciences

Chair: Ann S. Clark

Professors A. S. Clark, K. N. Dunbar, R. H. Granger, T. F. Heatherton, H. C. Hughes, J. G. Hull, G. C. Jernstedt, J. S. Taube, G. L. Wolford; Associate Professors Y. E. Cohen, C. P. Cramer, W. M. Kelley; Assistant Professors D. J. Bucci, P. U. Tse, P. J. Whalen, T. Wheatley; Senior Lecturer J. F. Pfister; Visiting Assistant Professors H. G. Foster, S. Robinson, J. L. Scheiner, M. Steven; Visiting Instructor C. B. Stein; Adjunct Professor J. A. Corson, M. J. Sateia; Adjunct Assistant Professors S. Dal Cin, M. J. Detzer, M. G. Funnell, K. A. Worth; Research Professors R. Elliott, M. S. Gazzaniga, S. T. Grafton, R. E. Kleck; Research Associate Professors J. M. Groh, J. D. Van Horn.

Normally, students sign up for the major during their fifth term in residence. Individuals can apply to participate in the Honors Program as early as the spring term of the junior year but no later than the fall term of the senior year (see 'Honors Program' below).

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEPARTMENTAL MAJOR

Prerequisites: Psychology 1 and Psychology 10. Students must obtain a grade no lower than C in Psychology 1. Students who fail to obtain a C or better in Psychology 1 may still complete a major in Psychological and Brain Sciences in the event that they earn C or better in their next two Psychology courses. Psychology 10 may be taken concurrently with Psychology 1. As a course prerequisite to the major, Psychology 10 should be taken at or before the time of declaring the major; otherwise it is to be taken in the first offering following sign-up for the major. Though we recommend against substituting, some other statistics courses are permitted as alternatives to Psychology 10, specifically: Economics 10, Government 10, Mathematics 10 and Sociology 10.

Requirements: The major requirements are as follows: The minimum major consists of one required course (Psychology 11) and seven electives. At least two of these seven must be numbered in the 20s, one 50 or higher, and another 60 or higher; the 60 or higher requirement constitutes the Culminating Experience requirement in Psychological and Brain Sciences. Of the two courses in the 20s, one must come from the set 22, 23, 24, or 25 and the other must come from the set 21, 26, or 28. Neither Psychology 88 nor 89 may be used to satisfy the 60 or above requirement. With prior approval, credit for up to two electives may be transferred from another institution but credit for the 50 and above and 60 and above courses must be obtained at Dartmouth. Transfer of credits must be approved by the Chair of the Undergraduate Committee and by the Registrar prior to taking the course(s). On occasion, by advanced planning and approval only, one of the seven electives may be taken from other related departments. Certain graduate courses may be taken by qualified and advanced undergraduates if permission isfrom the course instructor. Majors must be approved by the Chair of the Undergraduate Committee.

The course numbers have meaning. Courses numbered 10 and below do not carry major credit. Courses numbered in the 20s are introductions to particular sub-areas in psychology. Courses in the 40s, and 50s are more advanced than 20s level courses and generally have a narrower focus. Courses in the 60s are advanced laboratory courses. Courses in the 80s are upper level seminars.

The Department recommends that majors take more upper level (50, 60 and 80 level) courses than we require for the major.

THE MODIFIED MAJOR

The Psychology major cannot be modified. We will continue to allow students who wish to have Psychology as the secondary part of a Modified Major (e.g., Biology Modified with Psychology) to do so, if the major forms a unified and coherent whole, as approved by the Chair of the Undergraduate Committee.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR

The Minor will consist of 6 courses: Psychology 1 or 6 (prerequisite) plus five additional courses numbered 10 or above. Two of the five must be numbered in the 50s or above. While two of the six may be transfers, transfers cannot count toward the 50 or above requirement. Students interested in a minor should see the Chair of the Undergraduate Committee.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR AND MINOR IN NEUROSCIENCE

See page XXX for information regarding these interdepartmental major and minor programs.

HONORS PROGRAM

Qualified students majoring in Psychological and Brain Sciences have the opportunity to participate in an Honors Program that provides individualized advanced instruction and research experience in psychology.

Individuals may apply for honors work as early as the spring term of the junior year, but not later than the fall term of the senior year. Eligibility for honors is a 3.30 average in the major and a 3.0 average overall. Students interested in doing honors work should consult with the Chair of the Departmental Undergraduate Committee and obtain an honors packet from the Administrative Assistant in 103 Moore Hall.

The Psychological and Brain Sciences Department offers two fellowships for students who are interested in becoming involved in research projects: the Benjamin G. Benner '69 Undergraduate Research Support Fellowship, and the Lincoln Filene Undergraduate Fellowship in Human Relations. The fellowships are usually awarded to students to support research activities during a leave term that could serve as a foundation for honors research. Most often this is the summer preceding the student's senior year. Information about the fellowships and the application process may be obtained from the Department offices.

An honors student must fulfill course requirements of the major and the following additional requirements.

1. The completion of an acceptable thesis based upon at least two terms of laboratory or field research that is carried out under the auspices of Psychology 89 (page XXX) and is under the supervision of a department faculty member. The Honors thesis will entail an independent and individual project. Furthermore, the thesis project must be read and approved by the Thesis Committee.

2. Honors students will present their research to departmental faculty and interested others during the latter part of the spring term of their senior year.

3. Midway through the winter term preceding the completion of the thesis, all honors students must submit a prospectus of their thesis to their advisor and the Undergraduate Committee. The prospectus shall include a brief description of the rationale for the research, methods used, analyses to be employed and implications of the expected results.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DOCTOR'S DEGREE (PH.D.)

The Department offers graduate training leading to the Ph.D., and the program emphasizes acquaintance with the basic psychological processes that form the core of experimental psychology. Students are encouraged in their research to address problems of broad significance and to be knowledgeable about the theory that makes breadth coherent.

The requirements for the Ph.D. degree in Psychological and Brain Sciences are as follows:

1. A passing grade in the required statistical courses (100 and 101), the proseminar (112, 113 and 114), and in five additional graduate seminars.

2. Completion of the teaching apprenticeship program.

3. A passing grade in a specialist examination containing both written and oral parts, typically by the end of the second year.

4. Fulfillment of the two-year-residence requirement.

5. Completion of independent research and a dissertation; a defense of the dissertation; and presentation of the dissertation research in a public oral colloquium.

6. For more specific details regarding the program see the 'Departmental Guide to Graduate Program.'

PSYCHOLOGICAL AND BRAIN SCIENCES DEPARTMENT WEBSITE

Please check our website at http://www.dartmouth.edu/~psych/ for further information, including updated course offerings, PBS Bulletins and Departmental Colloquia.

COURSE OFFERINGS

1. Introductory Psychology

06F, 07W, 07S, 07F, 08W, 08S: 10

A course designed to serve as a general introduction to the science of human behavior. Emphasis will be placed upon the basic psychological processes of perception, learning,motivation as they relate to personality, individual differences, social behavior, and the behavior disorders. Dist: SOC. The staff.

6. Introduction to Neuroscience

07W, 08W: 10A

This course provides students with an introduction to the fundamental principles of neuroscience. The course will include sections on cellular and molecular neuroscience, neurophysiology, neuroanatomy, and cognitive neuroscience. Neuroscience is a broad field that is intrinsically interdisciplinary. As a consequence, the course draws on a variety of disciplines, including biochemistry, biology, physiology, pharmacology, (neuro)anatomy and psychology. The course will begin with in-depth analysis of basic functions of single nerve cells. We will then consider increasingly more complex neural circuits, which by the end of the course will lead to a analysis of the brain mechanisms that underlie complex goal-oriented behavior. Dist: SCI. Bucci.

7. First-Year Seminars in Psychology

Consult special listings. This course does not carry major credit.

10. Experimental Design, Methodology, and Data Analysis Procedures

07W, 07S, 9L 07X: 11 08W, 08S: 9L

This course is concerned with the various ways whereby empirical information is obtained and analyzed in psychology. Coverage will include the design of experiments and surveys, their execution, and the statistical tasks required to make sense of the data obtained using these techniques. There will be both lecture and discussion sections; independent projects will be required. The discussions and projects will include everyday applied problems as well as more traditional psychological problems.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6 (may be taken concurrently). Because of the large overlap in material covered, no student may receive credit for more than one of the courses Economics 10, Geography 10, Government 10, Mathematics 10, Mathematics 15 or 45, Psychology 10, Social Sciences 10, or Sociology 10 except by special petition. Cannot be taken concurrently with Psychology 11. Dist: QDS. Stein, Pfister.

11. Laboratory in Psychological Science

07W: 2 07S: 11 07X: 10 08W: 2 08S: 11; Laboratory

This laboratory course will provide a general introduction to the experimental methods of psychological science. Lectures will provide an overview of experimental techniques in four content areas (behavioral neuroscience, sensation/perception, cognitive/cognitive neuroscience, and social/applied psychology). The focus will be on how psychological scientists pursue research questions using diverse techniques, such as functional brain imaging, reaction time, psychopharmacology, self-reports, and survey methods. Laboratory exercises will complement the lecture material. Ethical issues as they pertain to psychological research will also be addressed.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6 and 10. Cannot be taken concurrently with Psychology 10. Dist: SLA. Bucci, Stein, Whalen.

21. Perception

06F, 07F: 11

Our senses are our windows to the world, and the scientific study of the senses is one of the oldest sub-disciplines in experimental psychology. This course introduces students to the fundamental workings of our senses of vision, hearing, touch, taste and smell. The course includes careful consideration of experimental methodology as well as content.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6. Dist: SCI. Tse.

22. Learning

06F, 07F: 12

This course considers the fundamental principles of learning and the implications of these principles for the understanding of human behavior. Empirical and theoretical issues in learning covered through examination of laboratory data and their extension to human behavior in complex life situations in the natural environment.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1. Dist: SOC. Jernstedt.

23. Social Psychology

07W, 08W: 11

This course is an introduction to contemporary psychological theory and research on social behavior. Specific topics include self-presentation, nonverbal behavior, interpersonal relations, conformity, persuasion, aggression, altruism, and group dynamics. Within these contexts, emphasis is placed on the importance of both personality and situational factors as determinants of social behavior.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1. Dist: SOC. Dal Cin.

24. Personality and Abnormal Psychology

06F, 07S, 07F, 08S: 9L

This course is mainly concerned with the various types of psychopathology, their diagnosis, etiology, and treatment. Personality theories will be discussed whenever they help to understand specific issues in abnormal behavior. The question of what constitutes solid mental health will also be examined. Case histories, films, and guest lectures by mental health professionals are features of this course, and each student is required to attend a small discussion group, write a paper, or complete some other independent project.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1. Dist: SOC. Scheiner.

25. Developmental Psychology

07S, 07X: 10A

We will examine the social and cognitive development of children from infancy to adolescence. We will also consider the implications of psychological research and theory for parenting, and for social and legal policies that affect young children. Film and videotape materials will be used to illustrate examples of infant and child behavior, Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6. Dist: SOC.

In 07S and 07X, Child Development (Identical to Education 18). Petitto, Scheiner.

26. Physiological Psychology

07W, 08W: 12

The course, designed for majors and non-majors, provides an introduction to the biological processes underlying behavior. Basic neuroanatomy, cellular physiology, and endocrinology will first be outlined. Such psychological concepts as sensation, learning, and motivation will then be related to neural function and to a variety of physiological correlates.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6. Dist: SCI.Steven.

28. Cognition (Identical to Cognitive Science 2)

07S, 08S: 2

An introduction to the study of thought, memory, language, and attention from the point of view of information processing. In surveying research in cognitive psychology, substantial contact is made with related cognitive sciences, such as artificial intelligence, linguistics, neuroscience, and contemporary philosophy. In the course of examining general principles of cognition, the following topics are discussed: mental imagery; concepts;

soning; discourse; monetary and courtroom decision making; eye-witness testimony; social attribution and stereotyping; language in chimpanzees; expert systems; the relationship between human and computer intelligence; the neural basis of cognition; the relationship between information processing and conscious experience; and the philosophical foundations of cognitive science.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6 or Computer Science 5. Dist: SOC. Kelley.

36. Experimental Curriculum Course

Not offered in the period from 06F through 07S

44. Psychology and Business

Not offered in the period from 06F through 07S

50-54. Issues in Psychology

Although the general topic remains the same, the content of these courses changes depending on the instructor in the course.

Note: Enrollment in courses numbered 50 or above is limited. Therefore, a student desiring one of these courses should elect it promptly.

50. Issues in Neuroscience

06F: 10, 10A 07W: 10A, 11 07S: 2A 07F, 08W, 08S: 10A, 2A

Courses with this number consider topics that bring to bear knowledge in the fields of psychology, neurology, and physiology. Topics are treated at an intermediate level and the focus will be on topics not covered in detail in Psychology 26 and 65. The selection of issues is at the discretion of the instructor. Enrollment limited.

Dist: SCI.

In 06F (Sec. 1) at 10, Hemispheric Differences in the Human Brain. This course will explore differences between the right and left hemispheres of the human brain. On cursory examination, the two hemispheres of the brain appear to be approximately mirror images of each other. More careful analysis, however, reveals extensive differences between the two hemispheres on both a structural and a functional level. We will examine evidence from a variety of sources, including neuroanatomical studies, neuroimaging experiments, studies involving patients with unilateral brain lesions, and split-brain research, to characterize the nature of the structural and functional differences between the two hemispheres. We will also study the development of laterality (ontogenetic and phylogenetic) to better understand why the two hemispheres of the human brain are specialized for different functions. Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6. Enrollment limited to 35 students. Funnell.

In 06F (Sec. 2) at 10A, Hormones and Behavior. The relations between hormones, brain and behavior will be discussed in a variety of species. We will discuss both the diversity in nature, as well as the common threads that govern interactions between hormones and behavior in animals. Topics to be discussed include hormonal influences on sexual behavior, parental behavior, aggression, learning and memory, thirst, feeding, cognitive functions, and stress responses. Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6. Enrollment limited to 35 students. Robinson.

In 07W (Sec. 1) at 10A, Spatial Cognition and Navigation-A Neurobiological Perspective. This course will explore both the cognitive and neural mechanisms underlying spatial orientation and navigation. The course will examine how animals/humans develop and maintain a sense of where they are and the direction they are facing. This process is fundamental to understanding mechanisms underlying navigation. We will examine processes of spatial orientation and navigation in a number of different species including insects, birds, fish, rodents, higher order mammals, and humans. An emphasis will be placed on understanding the neural mechanisms underlying theseprocesses. Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6. Enrollment limited to 35 students. Taube.

 

In 07W (Sec. 2) at 11, Drugs and Behavior. This course provides an introduction to the use and abuse of licit and illicit drugs and has a strong neuroscience orientation. The goal of the course is to describe the effects of selected drugs (both drugs of abuse and psychotherapeutic drugs) on behavior, mood, cognition and neuronal function. Material on the neurobiological basis of drug action from studies with humans and animals will be presented. The impact of drug use and abuse on society will also be discussed. Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6. Enrollment limited to 35 students. Robinson.

In 07S at 2A, Sleep and Sleep Disorders. This course will explore the basic biological mechanisms of sleep and circadian rhythms, including neuroanatomical, neurophysiological and chemical aspects of sleep/wake, as well as the relevant behavioral and social aspects of normal sleep. The course will then build upon this basic understanding of normal sleep and circadian rhythm to develop an overview of major sleep and circadian rhythm disorders, which include anatomical (e.g., sleep apnea), neurophysiological/chemical (e.g., narcolepsy), circadian (e.g., shift work or delayed sleep phase), and behavioral (e.g., conditioned insomnia) disturbances, as well as the interaction between sleep and other psychological, psychiatric and medical conditions. The critical importance of sleep to adequate daytime neuropsychological functioning will be elucidated through exploration of the impact of sleep deprivation and disorders. The social, public policy and economic issues pertinent to sleep and circadian rhythms will also be discussed. Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6 and 24 or 26. Enrollment limited to 35 students. Sateia.

In 07F, 08W, 08S at 10A, 2A, topics to be announced.

51. Issues in Information Processing

06F: 2A 07S: 2

Courses with this number consider topics from the areas of perception, memory, cognition, and quantitative models from the point of view of information processing. Material is treated at an intermediate level on a set of issues not covered in Psychology 21 and 28. Selection of issues is left to the discretion of the instructor, but specific emphasis is given to methodology. Enrollment limited. Dist: SOC.

In 06F at 2A, Cognitive Development. This course will provide an in-depth look at current theories and issues in cognitive development. We will investigate how children's thinking develops from infancy through early childhood. The focus will be on the interaction between children and their environment and how thinking and learning change with age and experience. Topics will include infant perception and cognition, representation of concepts and categories, reasoning, social cognition, memory, and language. Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6. Enrollment limited to 35 students. Stein.

In 07S at 2, The Psychology of Thinking, Reasoning, and Problem Solving. How do people think, reason, solve problems, form concepts, and reason creatively? We will delve into the mechanisms involved in reasoning such as the use of analogy, induction, and the creative generation of new ideas. We will also explore the question of why there are errors in reasoning, developmental changes in reasoning, how the brain is involved in reasoning, and the role of evolution in human thought. Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6. Enrollmentlimited to 35 students. Dunbar.

52. Issues in Learning and Development

07W: 10A 07S, 08S: 12

Courses with this number consider several important sub-fields of learning and psychological development. Material is treated at an intermediate level on a set of issues not covered in Psychology 22 and 25. Selection of issues is left to the discretion of the instructor, but they will be selected with emphasis upon the psychological principles emerging from the study of humans and animals in the context of learning, early experience, and maturations. Dist: SOC.

In 07W at 10A, Language Acquisition (Identical to Education 58). Human Language is one of the most spectacular of the brain's cognitive capacities, one of the most powerful instruments in the mind's tool kit for thought, and one of the most profound means we as a species use in social, emotional, and cultural communication. Yet the break-neck speed and seemingly "effortless" way that young children acquire Language remain its most miraculous characteristic. Despite different cultural backgrounds and home rearing environments, all healthy children by around age three and a half have already acquired the basic elements of their native Language. We will discover the biological capacities and the important social, family, and educational factors that, taken together, make this feat possible. To appreciate the task facing the young child, we will ask what is Language and how is it similar to and different from Communication. We will establish the basic facts of language acquisition, involving children's babbling, phonology, early vocabulary, morphology, syntax, semantics, and discourse knowledge, as well as their early gestural and pragmatic competence. Prevailing theoretical explanations and related research methods will also be explored. We will leave our hearing-speaking modality and explore the world of language acquisition in total silence-the world of Deaf and hearing children acquiring natural signed languages-as an innovative lens into the factors that are most key in acquiring all Language. We will dispel the myths of how bilingual children acquire two languages frombirth. We will discuss the educational implications regarding how language is presently taught in schools in light of the facts of human language acquisition. Prerequisite: One of the following: Psychology 1 or 6, Education 20. Petitto.

In 07S (Sec. 1) at 12, Animal Learning and Behavior. This course will survey the study of animal behavior, beginning with a consideration of evolutionary theory. Topics will include reproductive behavior, self-maintenance and defensive behaviors, and social interactions in a wide range of species. Animal learning theory will be integrated into these analyses. Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6. Enrollment limited to 35 students. Cramer.

In 07S, 08S (Sec. 2) at 12, Developmental Psychopathology. This course will provide an introduction to childhood Psychopathology using a developmental perspective. Written materials and lectures will focus on the diagnosis, etiology and treatment of a variety of childhood problems, including autism, anxiety disorders, learning disabilities, depression, attachment disorders, conduct disorders, and neurodevelopmental disorders. Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6 and 24, 25, or 59. Enrollment is limited to 35 students. Scheiner.

53. Issues in Social Psychology

07S: 10A

Courses with this number consider several important sub-fields of social psychology. Material is treated at an intermediate level on a set of issues that are not covered in Psychology 23. Selection of issues is left to the discretion of the instructor, but specific emphasis is given to individual and group attitudes, modes of interpersonal communication, and behavior control in humans and animals. Dist: SOC.

In 07S (Sec. 1) at 10A, Psychology of Decision Making. Life is full of decisions. We make dozens each day, some trivial and some that shape our future. We will cover theories of optimal decision making and we will look at how people actually make decisions. We will examine people making decisions in isolation and people making decisions with and in opposition to other people. We will consider ways to improve decision making. Topics will include: utilities, uncertainty, heuristics, bias, framing, overconfidence, cooperation, competition, negotiation, and so forth. Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6, 10 and either 23 or 28. Enrollment limited to 35 students. Wolford.

In 07S (Sec. 2) at 10A, Emotion. Long before the field of Psychology existed, there was an appreciation that our emotions exert a profound influence over our behavior. Psychology must struggle with the more tangible question of how to study emotions and thereby interpret their influence on behavior. In this course, we will examine how psychologists (past and present) have attempted to study emotion. We will augment this information by learning how the brain supports emotional processing. We will then consider human disorders where emotional processing has gone wrong, as this will inform us about how things were supposed to work in the first place. And, then, we will be in a better positionanswer the really big questions. What is an emotion? Who has emotions? Do you? Does your neighbor? Do German Shepherds? How do you know? Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6. Enrollment limited to 35 students. Whalen.

54. Issues in Applied Psychology

06F: 3A, 2A 07W: 10A

Courses with this number consider several important sub-fields of applied psychology, such as environmental psychology andconsumer behavior. Material is treated at an intermediate level. Selection of issues is left to the discretion of the instructor, but they will be selected with emphasis upon the extension of established psychological principles to problems of contemporary society.

In 06F (Sec. 1) at 3A, Health Psychology.How do psychological states impact immune system functioning? Why does the same illness affect different children, adults and their families in such different ways? Why are there gender differences in the treatment outcomes for heart disease? Why do people engage in unhealthy behaviors, such as smoking? What are the most effective ways to promote healthy behaviors such as exercise and healthy eating? What are the psychological implications of medical advances such as organ transplantation? These are among the questions considered in the subspecialty area of Health Psychology. This course will take an empirical research approach as we explore the role of psychology in addressing the key areas of: 1) health promotion; and 2) living with chronic physical illness. Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6. Enrollment limited to 35 students. Detzer.

In 06F (Sec. 2) at 2A, Forensic Psychology. This course explores topics at the interface of the profession of psychology and the criminal justice system. Seminar discussions and lectures will cover topics such as: psychological evaluation and treatment in a hospital / legal context, ethics and psychologists as an expert witness, competency to stand trial, and neuropsychological evaluation and criminal responsibility. Students will review and research in the areas of the "Detection of Malingering" and "Predictions using actuarial data verses the use of clinical judgments" in the prediction of dangerousness among: sexual offenders, psychopaths, and antisocial personality disorders. Students will prepare papers on one of these two topics and present them as part of a panel discussion. Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6. Enrollment limited to 35 students. Foster.

In 07W at 10A, Introduction to Behavior Therapy, This course introduces strategies involved in the application of learning principles to the assessment and treatment of certain human behavioral problems, and the field of behavior therapy. The first part of the course will include lectures and selected readings, while the remainder will be taught in a seminar format. Students will give brief oral presentations on selected topics and will study in depth specific areas in behavior therapy. Prerequisite: Psychology 1. Enrollment limited to 35 students. Corson.

59. An Introduction to Psychological Assessment

07W, 08W: 9L

This course is an overview of current approaches to the psychological assessment of individual differences in development, intelligence, personality and special abilities. It will consider the strengths, weaknesses, and issues associated with each approach and will cover the basic principles of test construction, evaluation, and interpretation. The course will also include a history of psychological testing, and a consideration of the important theoretical, ethical and social issues which psychological assessment has raised. Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6 and 10 or its equivalent. Enrollment limited to 35 students. Dist: SOC. Scheiner.

60-68. Laboratories in Psychology

60. Principles of Human Brain Mapping with fMRI

07W, 08W: 2A

This course is designed to introduce students to the theoretical and practical issues involved in conducting functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments of cognitive and behaviorally-related brain activity. Participants will gain an understanding of the physiological principles underlying the fMRI signal change, as well as the considerations for experimental design. The course will include firsthand exposure to the scanning environment and data collection procedures. Participants will be provided conceptual and hands-on experience with image processing and statistical analysis. At the completion of this course, it is expected that participants will be prepared to critique, design, and conduct fMRI studies; appreciate limitations and potentials of current fMRI methods and techniques; and better understand the broad range of expertise required in an fMRI research program. The course is designed to provide the participant with intensive, hands-on instruction. As a result, enrollment in the course will be limited to 20 people. Knowledge of MR physics, signal processing, or the UNIX/Linux operating system is not a prerequisite. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Dist: TLA. Van Horn.

63. Experimental Study of Social Behavior

06F, 07F: 11

This course deals with the ways in which social psychologists collect data to answer questions about motivation, social cognition, and interpersonal behavior. Theoretical issues and methodological problems are dealt with in class discussions, laboratories, and small group research projects on selected topics. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Dist: SOC. Heatherton.

64. Sensory Psychology

Not offered in the period from 06F through 07S

65. Physiology of Behavior

07S, 08S: 10

The primary focus of this course is the physiological basis of behavior. Such topics as localization of function, neural models, and the physiological bases of sensory/motor systems, learning/memory, spatial cognition, and emotion are considered. The laboratory introduces the student to the anatomy and physiology of the mammalian central nervous system and to some of the principal techniques used in behavioral neuroscience. Laboratories are scheduled for a 3.5 hour period on Tuesday morning or afternoons; students will be assigned to one of these two laboratory sections. Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6 and 26 or Biology 34 and permission of the instructor. Dist: SLA. Taube.

80-87. Seminars in Psychology

The topic areas for seminars may change from year to year. Course descriptions of seminars are available from the Psychology Department office. Enrollment in seminars is limited and by permission only. Enrollment priority is given to senior majors. Permission may be obtained during an annual signup period that runs the first two weeks in May. Further information may be obtained at the Department office or from the individual instructor.

80. Functional Neuroanatomy through Clinical Case Studies

07S: 3A

Authentic clinical cases will be used to illustrate the function of a comprehensive array of brain regions. Case studies will reveal the behavioral deficits that arise from specific brain lesions, diseases or genetic malformations. Neuroimaging studies and other cognitiveresearch will then be discussed to complete the understanding of each clinical case and to yield a full picture of the function of each brain region. Sample cases/topics include patient "H.M.", memory and the hippocampus; patient "Phineas Gage", personality and the frontal lobe; and patient "Tan", language and Broca's area. Permission of instructor. Steven.

81. The Broken Brain

07W: 10A

This course is a seminar on human brain function. We will use brain disorders as a basis to investigate how the normal brain functions. Permission of instructor. Kelley.

82. Transgenic Approaches in Behavioral Neuroscience

07S: 10A

The goal of this course is to become familiar with the ways in which genetically-engineered mice have been used to examine key issues in neuroscience. Attention will focus on "knock-in" and "knock-out" approaches, but the course will also cover "natural" and "selected" mouse models. The course begins with a description of the first transgenic model and from there will explore the evolution of increasingly sophisticated genetic techniques used currently. Primary research articles will be read to examine the methods as well as the advantages and disadvantages of genetic approaches.Specific areas of neuroscience research including learning and memory, reward processes and body weight regulation will be covered. Limited to 15 students. Prerequisite: Biology 13 (or Genetics equivalent) and Psychology 6 or Psychology 26. Permission of instructor. Robinson.

83. Psychology of Meaning

06F: 10A

This course explores one of the hallmarks of being human: trying to make sense of the world around us. The quest to understand and predict our environment manifests itself in daily, mundane ways as well as in a range of extra-worldly beliefs. We will examine our ability to make sense by integrating research from social, cognitive and neuropsychology. We will consider the brain's proclivity to fill in gaps and make assumptions, how we gain meaning from being in groups, and the healthy and not-so-healthy implications of our search for meaning. Permission of instructor. Wheately.

83. Non-Verbal Aspects of Social Interaction

07W: 2A

The seminar will focus on the nonverbal and paraverbal dimensions of human communication. Particular attention will be given to research which has examined the role of gaze behavior, facial expressions of emotion and appearance cues in social relationships. Video records of social interaction will be used to demonstrate and illustrate the various ways in which nonverbal behaviors play an important role in interpersonal dynamics. A mid-term exam, a seminar paper and participation in class discussions are the mechanisms through which the student's mastery of the seminar materials is assessed. Permission of instructor. Kleck.

85. Human Differences in Abilities and Personality: the Psychology of Inequality

07S: 10A

No two persons are alike, not even identical twins. Some of the differences are on traits, like mental ability, energy, acceptance of risk, mental health, etc., that have a good deal to do with important life outcomes. We will consider where some of these differences come from, how they affect our notions of equality of opportunity and of result, and what might be done to palliate their effects, among other matters. Permission of instructor. Elliott.

86. Interpersonal Relationships

06F: 2A

The primary objective of the course is to introduce the student to theory and research in relationship science. Topics will include early relationships, relationships and health, relationship formation (e.g., friendships, romantic and marital relationships), relationship growth and maintenance, satisfaction and stability, infidelity, conflict and dissolution, and therapeutic interventions. Throughout the course, students will be encouraged to critically evaluate research, including that which is disseminated by media, concerning relationship phenomena. Permission of instructor. Worth.

86. The Neural Basis of Consciousness

07W: 2A

The goal of this course is to develop an understanding of what consciousness is, and how it comes into existence through the activity of neurons in the nervous system. We will be focusing on the ancient mind/body problem, but will bring the new tools of modern neuroscience to bear on this age old puzzle. The puzzle is this: Neurons are publicly observable entities; yet the subjective experience that their activity gives rise to is not publicly observable. Indeed, subjective experience appears to have properties that do not seem to be inherent to matter, such as redness, painfulness, and other 'qualia.' The puzzle is how seemingly different classes of events, one mental and the other physical, can both be realized in one and the same neuronal events. We will begin by focusing on some of the philosophical issues. We will then increasingly focus on the neuronal basis of subjective experience in light of the recent findings of modern neuroscience. Permission of instructor. Tse.

87. Nature and Nurture

06F: 10A

One of the continuing discussions of our era is whether differences between individuals can be attributed to inherent characteristics or to environmental influences, in other words, the nature-nurture debate. We will examine writings representing the spectrum of arguments, particularly those taking modern combinatorial or interactionist positions. Analyses of both animal and human behaviors will be included. Students will select a particular behavioral domain of interest to them and review current information about the sources of variation in that behavior. Permission of instructor. Cramer.

88. Independent Research

All terms: Arrange

This course is designed to enable qualified students to engage in independent laboratory or field research under the direction of a faculty member. Students may take one to three terms of Independent Research. No more than two terms of 88, 89, or a combination of 88s and 89s may count toward the eight required courses for the major. This course may not be used to fulfill the upper-level (60 or above) major requirement.

Under special circumstances, a student may submit a written petition to the Undergraduate Committee for permission to enroll in Psychology 88 for the purpose of doing library research for one term only. Such a petition must be endorsed by a faculty member. Non-majors may request exemption from normal prerequisites and other requirements of Psychology 88.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6, 10 and 11. Written permission from the advisor, and then written permission from the Chair of the Undergraduate Committee. The staff.

89. Honors Research

All terms: Arrange

This course is designed to enable especially qualified Psychology majors, usually seniors, to engage in independent laboratory or field research under the direction of a faculty member.Students may take two or three terms of Honors Research, but no more than two terms of 88, 89, or a combination of 88s and 89s may count toward the eight required courses for the major. This course may not be used to fulfill the upper-level (60 or above) major requirement. A student must have a minimum grade point average of 3.30 in the major and 3.00 overall to enroll and must enroll before the end of the Fall term of their Senior year. Honors theses will be evaluated by a two-person Thesis Committee approved by the Undergraduate Committee. Thesis Committee members must be identified prior to the student signing up for Psychology 89. The Thesis Committee must include a regular member of the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences faculty. The other individual, if not a regular member of PBS, must have an active academic appointment (e.g., Research Associate, Research Assistant Professor, Medical School Faculty, Faculty in other departments of the College, for instance). Either Committee member may serve as the primary advisor. The two members of the Thesis Committee may not be in the same laboratory. The Thesis Committee will read and evaluate the thesis and make recommendations to the Undergraduate Committee regarding the awarding of Honors or High Honors. In addition, all Honors students will present their work in a departmental symposium at the conclusion of the Spring term. The Thesis Committee will also recommend in writing meritorious students to the Undergraduate Committee for consideration for the various departmental prizes. Two terms of this course are required of those who seek to graduate with Honors in Psychological and Brain Sciences.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6, 10 and 11. A sixty level course is strongly recommended. Students should check well in advance with their faculty advisor for additional prerequisites. Written permission from the advisor, and then written permission from the Chair of the Undergraduate Committee. The staff.

90. Independent Neuroscience Research

All terms: Arrange

This course is designed to enable students to engage in independent laboratory research under the direction of a neuroscience faculty member. Students may take up to two terms of independent research. Students are required to write a final report of their research.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 3, 6, and 10 . Written permission from the advisor, and then written permission from the Chair of the Neuroscience Oversight Committee. The staff.

91. Honors Neuroscience Research

All terms: Arrange

This course is designed to enable especially qualified Neuroscience majors, usually seniors, to engage in independent laboratory research under the direction of a neuroscience faculty member. Students must take at least two terms of Psychology 91. A student must have a minimum grade point average of 3.30 in the major and 3.00 overall to enroll and must enroll by the Fall term of the senior year. The honors thesis will be evaluated by a two-person thesis committee approved by the Neuroscience Committee. Thesis committee members must be identified prior to the student signing up for Psychology 91. The thesis committee must include a regular faculty member of the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. The other individual must have an active academic appointment at Dartmouth. A prospectus of proposed research is due by the end of the fall term for approval by the Neuroscience Committee. The student is expected to submit a written thesis, give a public presentation and pass an oral examination administered by the thesis committee.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6, and 10. A 60 level course is strongly recommended. Students should check well in advance with their faculty advisor for additional prerequisites. Written permission from the advisor, and then written permission from the Chair of the Neuroscience Oversight Committee. The staff.

GRADUATE COURSES

100. Measurement and Statistics I

06F: M, W, Th 9-10 am:. Wolford.

101. Measurement and Statistics II

07W: M, W, Th 9-10 am.. Wolford.

111. Seminar in Special Topics

06F, 07W, 07S: Arrange

06F: Arrange: Taube: Spatial Cognition and Navigation-A Neurobiological Perspective

07W: 10A (Sec 1): Jernstedt: Teaching, Learning, and the Brain

07W: Arrange (Sec 2): Granger: Introduction to Computational Neuroscience

07S: Arrange (Sec 1): Tse: Vision and the Brain: How Neural Circuits Process Visual Information

07S: Arrange (Sec 2): Heatherton: Social Brain Science

112. Proseminar

06F: Arrange. The staff.

113. Proseminar

07W: Arrange. The staff.

114. Proseminar

07S: Arrange. The staff.

120. Tutorial Reading

All terms: Arrange. The staff.

187. Supervised Undergraduate Teaching.

All terms: Arrange. The staff.

188. Supervised Research. (one course credit)

All terms: Arrange. The staff.

Normally taken by first-year students.

189. Independent Research. (two course credits)

All terms: Arrange. The staff.

Normally taken by second-/third-year students who are completing the Specialist and beginning to develop a thesis proposal.

190. Predissertation Research. (three course credits)

All terms: Arrange. The staff.

Normally taken by third-/fourth-year students who have completed the Specialist but not yet proposed the dissertation.

191. Dissertation Research. (three course credits)

All terms: Arrange. The staff.

Taken by fourth-year students who have proposed the dissertation.