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Philosophy

Chair: Amy R. Allen

Professors J. L. Driver, B. Gert, J. H. Moor, W. P. Sinnott-Armstrong, R. A. Sorensen; Associate Professors A. R. Allen, S. J. Brison, S. S. Levey; Assistant Professors J. V. Kulvicki, A. L. Roskies, C. J. Thomas; Lecturer A. E. Bumpus; Visiting Professor A. Honneth; Visiting Associate Professor J. L. Crocker; Visiting Assistant Professor J. J. Ketland; Adjunct Professor C. E. Heckman.

THE MAJOR

1. Prerequisites:

(a) Philosophy 1 or 2

(b) Philosophy 3 (or 6 if not used to satisfy requirements of the major)

2. Requirements: Eight philosophy courses beyond the prerequisites including:

(a) Two from Philosophy 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, and 17

(b) One from Philosophy 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, and 35

(c) One from Philosophy 8, 37, and 38

(d) One advanced seminar, Philosophy 80, which serves as the culminating experience in the major

Mathematics 39 (or 69) may be counted toward the major.

The following is a suggested major for those students contemplating graduate studies in philosophy: Philosophy 6, 8, 11, 13, 14, 15, 16, 30, 31, 34 or 35, and 37; selected seminars. It is strongly recommended that students contemplating graduate studies in philosophy enroll in the Honors Program.

THE MODIFIED MAJOR

1. Prerequisites:

(a) Philosophy 1 or 2

(b) Philosophy 3 (or 6 if not used to satisfy requirements of the modified major)

2. Requirements: Six philosophy courses beyond the prerequisites including:

(a) One from Philosophy 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, and 17

(b) One from Philosophy 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, and 35

(c) One from Philosophy 8, 37, and 38

(d) One advanced seminar, Philosophy 80, which serves as the culminating experience in the modified major

3. Four courses not in Philosophy that must be at a non-introductory level, have a substantial philosophical content, and contribute to a reasonably connected program of study. These courses must be approved in writing by the Chair of the Department of Philosophy.

MINORS IN PHILOSOPHY

Minor in Philosophy

1. Prerequisites:

(a) Philosophy 1 or 2

(b) Philosophy 3 (or 6 if not used to satisfy requirements of the minor)

2. Requirements: Six philosophy courses beyond the prerequisites including:

(a) One from Philosophy 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, and 17

(b) One from Philosophy 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, and 35

(c) One from Philosophy 8, 37, and 38

(d) One advanced seminar in Philosophy

 

Minor in History of Philosophy

1. Prerequisites:

(a) Philosophy 1 or 2

(b) Philosophy 3 (or 6 if not used to satisfy requirements of the minor)

2. Requirements: Six philosophy courses beyond the prerequisites including:

Four courses from Philosophy 8, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, and 80 (if the seminar topic is within the history of philosophy)

 

Minor in Moral Philosophy

1. Prerequisites:

(a) Philosophy 1 or 2

(b) Philosophy 3 (or 6 if not used to satisfy requirements of the minor)

2. Requirements: Six philosophy courses beyond the prerequisites including:

(a) Philosophy 8 and 37

(b) Two courses from Philosophy 9, 21, 22, 24, 25, 38, and 80 (if the seminar topic is within moral philosophy)

 

Minor in Epistemology and Metaphysics

1. Prerequisites:

(a) Philosophy 1 or 2

(b) Philosophy 3 (or 6 if not used to satisfy requirements of the minor)

2. Requirements: Six philosophy courses beyond the prerequisites including:

(a) Philosophy 30 and 31

(b) Two from Philosophy 13, 14, 15, 16, 26, 27, 28, 29, 34, 35, and 80 (if the seminar topic is within epistemology and metaphysics)

 

Minor in Logic and Philosophy of Science

1. Prerequisites:

(a) Philosophy 1 or 2

(b) Philosophy 3

2. Requirements: Six philosophy courses beyond the prerequisites including:

(a) Philosophy 6 and 27

(b) Two from Philosophy 26, 32, 33, 34, Mathematics 39 or 69, and Philosophy 80 (if the seminar topic is within logic and philosophy of science)

NON-RECORDING OPTION

No course with a grade of NR resulting from use of the Non-Recording Option may be counted for the philosophy major, modified major, or minor.

TRANSFER CREDIT

At most two transfer credits may be counted toward the major or minor but transfer credit cannot be used to satisfy the advanced seminar requirement.

FOREIGN STUDY

Each year the Department of Philosophy offers about fifteen students the opportunity to spend a fall term at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland. While there they will take a course in philosophy taught by a Dartmouth faculty member (Philosophy 50). In addition, each student will take two university courses (Philosophy 60, 61). Students will receive at most three course credits in this term. Students participating in the program must have completed two courses in philosophy prior to their participation but not necessarily prior to their application for admission to the program. However, preference will be given to those students who have completed more philosophy courses. A member of the University of Edinburgh philosophy faculty will offer a course at Dartmouth in the summer term. Students going to Edinburgh should consider taking this course. Normally, application for admission to the program should be made during the fall term prior to the contemplated term in Edinburgh. There will be an opportunity to participate in the junior year Honors Program while in Edinburgh.

PHILOSOPHY HONORS PROGRAM

The Honors Program is designed for qualified students interested in doing intensive and individualized work in philosophy. Only those students who have successfully completed the Honors Program are eligible to receive major standings of Honors or High Honors.

The program is divided into three stages: the Junior Honors Seminar, preparation and submission of a thesis proposal, and thesis writing. All students who register for the Philosophy Major and who expect to have the necessary cumulative averages (3.50 in Philosophy and 3.33 overall) are invited to join the Junior Honors Seminars. In order to be accepted for thesis writing, a student must successfully complete a Junior Honors Seminar, maintain or attain by the end of the Junior year the required averages, and have a thesis proposal approved by the Philosophy Department by the end of the term in residence prior to commencement of thesis writing.

Junior Honors Seminars. Students are required to spend one term, but may elect to spend two terms, in a Junior Honors Seminar prior to submission of a thesis proposal for departmental approval. These seminars meet on an average of four times per term, and each student will prepare a short paper for each meeting. The Junior Honors Seminar should be completed by the end of the spring term of the junior year.

Preparation and Submission of Thesis Proposal. After successful completion of a Junior Honors Seminar, the student should secure a thesis director and then write a proposal in consultation with the director. After the proposal is approved by the director, it will be submitted to the Philosophy Department for approval. Since the Department may request that the student rewrite the proposal, we recommend that a proposal be submitted to the Department by the seventh week of the term prior to thesis writing. In order to advance to thesis writing, the student must have a proposal approved by the Department by the last week of the term prior to thesis writing.

Thesis Writing. A student must write a two-term thesis, for which one or two course credits may be received. Only one such course credit may be used in satisfying major requirements. The minimum length for a two-term thesis is seventy-five pages. Four bound copies of the thesis, one on acid-free bond paper, must be submitted. A thesis written during the fall and winter must be submitted by the first day of the spring term. A thesis completed during the spring term must be submitted by the seventh Monday of the spring term. An oral defense will be scheduled shortly thereafter.

INTRODUCTORY COURSES

1. Introduction to the Problems of Philosophy

06F, 07S: 12 07F: 10, 2 08S: 10A

This course acquaints the student with some of the fundamental problems in at least three main areas of Philosophy: Theory of Knowledge, Metaphysics, and Ethics. Questions treated in lectures normally include: Can we know anything, and, if so, how? Does God exist? What is the relation between mind and body? Are our actions free or determined? What makes an act morally right or wrong? Some attention will be paid to the ways in which answers to these questions can be combined to create philosophical systems or total world views. The readings might include both contemporary essays and classic works by such philosophers as Plato, Descartes, and Hume.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV. The staff.

2. Introduction to Philosophical Classics

07X: 10

An examination of classic texts by such philosophers as Plato, Descartes, Hume, and Nietzsche. Lectures will concentrate on the philosophical systems constructed by these thinkers emphasizing their attempt to develop total world views.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV. The staff.

3. Reason and Argument

06F, 07F: 11

An introduction to informal logic with special attention to the analysis of actual arguments as they arise in daily life as well as in legal, scientific, and moral reasoning. Along with the analysis and criticism of arguments, the course will also consider the methods for constructing arguments that are both logically correct and persuasive.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV. The staff.

6. Logic and Language

07W, 07S, 08W, 08S: M,Tu,Th, F  9; Discussion M-F 4:50-5:20

This course, which is taught on the self-paced instruction format, is an introduction to the study of arguments. Topics include the nature of logic, the identification of logical fallacies, inductive reasoning, syllogistic, sentential, and predicate logic.

Open to all classes. Dist: QDS. The staff.

7. First-Year Seminars in Philosophy

Consult special listings

8. Introduction to Moral Philosophy

07W: 12 08W: 10

A study of the main types of ethical theories from Plato to the pragmatists and existentialists. Attention will be paid to the relevance of major historical positions to contemporary issues.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV. The staff.

9. Topics in Applied Ethics

06F: 10A 08W: 9

An examination of the ethical dimensions of some contemporary controversies. Topics will vary from year to year but may include: business, death, discrimination, the environment, gender, law, media, race, sex, technology, and war. The course may be taken more than once for credit with permission of the instructor.

Open to all classes. No prerequisites. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV.

In 06F, The Ethics of Reproduction. Driver.

In 08W, Ethics and Evolution. Driver.

HISTORICAL COURSES

11. Ancient Philosophy

07S: 10 07F: 11

A study of the origins of Western philosophical thought as it emerges in ancient Greece. Focus will be on such questions as: What is the fundamental nature of reality? Is knowledge possible? What is the nature of the soul? What is human happiness? Are there objective truths about moral and political values? Are all events causally determined? Do human beings have free will? Ought we to fear death? Although the focus of the course will alternate from year to year, the figures treated may include: Presocratics, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle and later Greek philosophers (Epicureans, Stoics and Sceptics).

Prerequisite: Philosophy 1, 2, 3, 6, 8, or 9, or permission of the instructor. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: W. Thomas.

12. Medieval Philosophy

Not offered in the period from 06F through 08S

A study of the philosophy of the Middle Ages. Attention is focused on philosophic thinkers and movements of major significance, e.g., Augustine and Christian Platonism, the recovery of Aristotle by Maimonides and Aquinas, and skepticism and mysticism from Ockham to St. John of the Cross.

Prerequisite: Philosophy 1, 2, 3, 6, 8, 9, or 11, or an appropriate course in religion or the classics with permission of the instructor. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: W.

13. Modern Philosophy: Continental Rationalism

06F: 12 08W: 10

A study of early modern philosophy in the Continental rationalist tradition of the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. Focus is on the major works of Descartes, Spinoza and Leibniz, with some attention to responses from their contemporaries (e.g., Arnauld, Gassendi, Mersenne). Central themes include substance, matter, mind, the laws of nature, space and time, God, truth, necessity and contingency.

Prerequisite: Philosophy 1, 2, 3, 6, 8, or 9, or permission of the instructor. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: W. Levey.

14. Modern Philosophy: British Empiricism

07W, 08S: 2

A study of early modern philosophy in the British empiricist tradition of the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. Focus is on the major works of Locke, Berkeley and Hume, though possibly with attention to some others (e.g. Bacon, Hobbes, Reid). Central themes include substance, perception, secondary qualities, cognition, meaning, causation, identity and reality.

Prerequisite: Philosophy 1, 2, 3, 6, 8, or 9, or permission of the instructor. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: W. Kulvicki.

15. Modern Philosophy: Hume and Kant

Not offered in the period from 06F through 08S

An in-depth introduction to the theoretical and practical philosophies of David Hume and Immanuel Kant. Topics include: Hume's scepticism about induction and the law of cause and effect; Kant's effort to "save" metaphysics from Hume's sceptical attack; Kant's account of the a priori forms (space and time, the categories) by means of which we construct our experience; his attempt to save freedom from Hume's compatibilism; his grounding of practical philosophy in the idea of transcendental freedom.

Prerequisite: Philosophy 11, 12, 13, or 14, or permission of the instructor. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: W.

16. Modern Philosophy: Nineteenth Century Continental

Not offered in the period from 06F through 08S

This course begins with a review of some of the central implications of Kant's Critical philosophy, both for the theory of knowledge and for practical philosophy. It then considers reactions to Kant from fellow idealists, such as Hegel; materialists such as Feuerbach and Marx; and anti-rationalists such as Kierkegaard and Nietzsche.

Prerequisite: Philosophy 1, 2, 3, 6, 8, or 9, or permission of the instructor. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: W.

17. Phenomenology and Existentialism

08W: 11

A study of German and French philosophy from the first half of the twentieth century. The emphasis is usually on Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, Sartre, and de Beauvoir. Major themes of the course include subjectivity, freedom, responsibility, and the nature of social relationships.

Prerequisite: Philosophy 1, 2, 3, 6, 8, or 9, or permission of the instructor. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: W. Allen

18. Contemporary Continental Philosophy

07W: 10

A study of recent themes in continental philosophy. Discussion will focus on such philosophical movements as critical theory, structuralism, poststructuralism, contemporary psychoanalytic theory, and French feminist theory. The emphasis will be on such philosophers as Derrida, Foucault, Lacan, Deleuze, Habermas, Levinas, and Irigaray.

Prerequisite: Philosophy 1, 2, 3, 6, 8, or 9, or permission of the instructor. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: W. Allen.

COURSES RELATED TO OTHER DISCIPLINES

20. Philosophy and Literature

Not offered in the period from 06F through 08S

This course will examine several philosophical theories that formulate criteria of aesthetic and literary value, and will test them by applications to specific works of literature. Readings and discussions will focus on definitions and analyses of tragedy developed by such philosophers as Plato, Aristotle, Hegel, and Nietzsche. Assignments will also include dramatic works by ancient Greek and contemporary American playwrights.

No prerequisite, although Philosophy 1 or 2 is strongly recommended. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV.

21. Philosophy of Human Nature

07X: 10

A consideration of philosophic problems concerning human nature including such topics as the nature of emotion and reason, the philosophical implications of depth psychology, and the basis of human values.

Prerequisite: Philosophy 1 or 2, or selected courses in psychology, or permission of the instructor. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV. Gert.

22. Feminism and Philosophy (Identical to Women's and Gender Studies 46.1)

06F, 08W: 2

This course examines the relationship between feminism and philosophy. The focus is on such questions as: Is the Western philosophical canon inherently sexist? How should feminist philosophers read the canon? Are Western philosophical concepts such as objectivity, reason, and impartiality inherently masculinist concepts? The course may focus on either the ways in which feminists have interpreted great figures in the history of philosophy (e.g., Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, Kant, Nietzsche), or on the ways in which feminists have rethought basic concepts in core areas of philosophy (e.g., epistemology, ethics, metaphysics, political philosophy, philosophy of science), or both.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: CI. Brison.

23. Philosophy of Art

07W: 2A

This course focuses on points of contact between philosophy and the arts. The course examines and attempts to develop theories of artistic representation, of expression in art and elsewhere, of the nature of metaphor and its role in art criticism, and of the nature of art. These matters are approached via works in the various arts and the writings of philosophers.

Prerequisite: Philosophy 1, 2, 3, 6, 8, or 9, or permission of the instructor. Dist: ART. Kulvicki.

24. Philosophy of Law

06F, 08W: 11

This course examines such topics as the concept of law, the dispute between natural law theorists and legal positivists, the relations between law and morality, criminal responsibility and legal punishment, and rights of the individual against the state. Attention will be paid to the relevance of legal theory to contemporary legal controversies.

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors, and to first-year students by permission. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: W. Crocker.

25. Philosophy of Medicine

07S: 11

An examination of some philosophical issues in the field of medicine. Primary focus will be on the moral issues that arise in dealing with individual patients, e.g., paternalism, informed consent, euthanasia, and abortion. There will also be an attempt to clarify such important concepts as death, illness, and disease.

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV. Gert.

26. Philosophy and Computers

07S, 08S: 11

The accomplishments of artificial intelligence research and the widespread use of computers in our society confront us with many interesting philosophical questions. What are the limits of artificial intelligence? Could computers ever think or feel? Is the Turing test a good test? Are we really computers? Are there decisions computers should never make? Do computers threaten our privacy in special ways? This course will consider such issues in order to explore the philosophical implications of computing.

Open to all classes. Dist: TAS. Moor.

27. Philosophy of Science

07S, 07F: 10

This course examines the philosophical assumptions of both the natural and the social sciences. Topics discussed include the distinction between science and nonscience, the nature and types of scientific explanation, the structure and function of scientific laws and theories, the problems and paradoxes of confirmation and disconfirmation, the role of mathematics and models of science, the basis for probability and induction, and the relationship between science and values.

Prerequisite: Philosophy 1 or 2, or selected courses in the sciences, or permission of the instructor. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV. Crocker.

28. Philosophy of Religion

Not offered in the period from 06F through 08S

An examination of some philosophical problems associated with religion. Discussion will focus on such topics as the following: arguments concerning the existence and nature of God, the meaning of religious language, the rationality of religious belief, the relation between religion and science and religion and morality.

Prerequisite: Philosophy 1 or 2, or selected courses in religion, or permission of the instructor. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV.

29. Philosophy of Mathematics

07S: 10A

A study of philosophical issues in the foundations of mathematics. What is mathematics about? What, if anything, makes the propositions of mathematics true? What is the nature of the "objects" studied in mathematics (numbers, functions, groups, etc.)? Do they exist independently of the mind? Is there really an infinite, and if so, what is it? What is the nature of mathematical knowledge? How is that knowledge even possible for us? Those are the kinds of questions that will occupy us in this class. Readings will be selected from classic and contemporary sources on such topics as the concept of number, the theory of sets, the nature of proof and truth in mathematics, the relationship between our grasp of higher mathematics and our grasp of simple counting, and the many disputes between "realism" and "anti-realism" about mathematics.

Prerequisite: Philosophy 1, 2, 3, 6, 8, or 9, or permission of the instructor. Any prior class in mathematics would be helpful, but no background in mathematics beyond an understanding of the most elementary concepts will be presupposed. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV. Levey.

SYSTEMATIC COURSES

30. Theory of Knowledge

06F: 10 07F: 12

Questions considered in this course are: What is knowledge? and How and to what extent is knowledge possible? An investigation of such topics as skepticism and certainty, knowledge of the self, sense-perception and an external world, memory and the past, and thoughts and feelings of others.

Prerequisite: Philosophy 1, 2, 3, 6, 8, or 9, or permission of the instructor. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV. Levey.

31. Topics in Metaphysics

07W: 12 08S: 10

This course will focus on one or more central topics in metaphysics, possibly including the question of God's existence, the possibility of free will, personal identity, the nature of actions and intentions, space and time, change, the infinite, universals, truth, necessity, abstract objects, and the nature of the self. This course may be taken more than once for credit with permission of the instructor.

Prerequisite: Philosophy 1, 2, 3, 6, 8, or 9, or permission of the instructor.

In 07W, Realism and Antirealism. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV. Thomas.

In 08S, Topic to be announced. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV. Levey.

32. Intermediate Logic

08W: 2A

An investigation of three branches of symbolic logic: first-order predicate logic with identity, sentential modal logic, and predicate modal logic. Topics to be covered may include Russell's theory of definite descriptions; the treatment of non-denoting terms in logics known as "free logics"; investigations of various modalities, involving pairs of concepts such as necessity and possibility, being obligatory and being permitted, and being known and being believed; Kripke-style "possible world" semantics.

Prerequisite: Philosophy 6, or Mathematics 39 or 69, or permission of the instructor. Dist: QDS. Moor.

33. Philosophy of Logic

Not offered in the period from 06F through 08S

An investigation of such topics as the relationship between natural languages and formal languages, indeterminacy of translation, reference, analyticity, theories of truth, logical paradoxes, and deviant and non-standard logics.

Prerequisite: Philosophy 3 or 6, or Mathematics 39 or 69, or permission of the instructor. Dist: QDS.

34. Philosophy of Language

06F: 2 08S: 12

The study of language is one of the defining features of contemporary philosophy. This course examines classic issues and ideas in the philosophy of language as they are articulated across the twentieth century. We shall investigate the nature of language, relationships between language and thought, and the application of theories of language to philosophical problems. The focus will be on theories of reference and meaning as they are developed by philosophers such as Frege, Russell, Quine, Kripke, Wittgenstein, and Grice. Specific topics may include fiction, counterfactual conditionals, past-tense statements, indexicals, truth, and vagueness.

Prerequisite: Philosophy 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 8, or 9, or permission of the instructor. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV. Sorensen.

35. Philosophy of Mind

06F, 08W: 2

In this course, we will consider different views of the relationship between mind and brain, from Dualism to contemporary versions of Materialism and Functionalism. We will consider whether any materialist view of the mind can adequately account for consciousness. We may also look into the nature of mental representation and into epistemological questions such as whether we are the ultimate authorities on our own thoughts and whether we can have knowledge of other minds. Other possible topics include split-brain patients, personal identity, and animal minds.

Prerequisite: Philosophy 1, 2, 3, 6, 8, or 9, or permission of the instructor. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV. Kulvicki.

37. Ethical Theory

07S: 12 07F: 10A

This course will be primarily concerned with such questions as What is morality? Are there universal values? and Why should one be moral? and with the responses to them by several contemporary philosophers. The application of ethical theory to some contemporary issues also will be considered.

Prerequisite: Philosophy 1, 2, 8, or 9, or permission of the instructor. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV. Crocker.

38. Political and Social Philosophy

08W: 12

Through the study of classical and contemporary texts in political and social theory, we will consider such issues as how and to what extent (if at all) political authority can be justified, what the criteria are for distributive justice, and how social and political inequalities (such as those based on race and gender) should be conceptualized. In different years the focus of the course may concentrate on different philosophers, for example, the emphasis may be on historical philosophers or on contemporary philosophers. The philosophers covered will include some of the following: Plato, Hobbes, Locke, Mill, Rousseau, Marx, Rawls, Habermas.

Prerequisite: Philosophy 1, 2, 3, 6, 8, or 9, or permission of the instructor. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV. Allen

SPECIAL COURSES

50. Special Topics in Philosophy

06F: D.F.S.P. 07X: 10A 07F: 3B, D.F.S.P. 08W, 08S: 10A

Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: Varies. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: Varies.

In 06F, D.F.S.P. Nietzsche and Philosophy. Allen.

In 07X at 10A, Topic to be announced. Edinburgh Visitor.

In 07F at 3B, Film and Philosophy. Driver.

In 07F, D.F.S.P. Topic to be announced. Gert.

In 08W at 10A, Topic to be announced. Sinnott-Armstrong.

In 08S at 10A, Topic to be announced. Roskies.

60. Foreign Study in Philosophy I

06F, 07F: D.F.S.P.

Credit for this course is awarded to students who have successfully completed a philosophy course at the University of Edinburgh while a member of the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program at Edinburgh.

Prerequisite: two courses in philosophy. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV.

61. Foreign Study in Philosophy II

06F, 07F: D.F.S.P.

Credit for this course is awarded to students who have successfully completed a philosophy course at the University of Edinburgh while a member of the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program at Edinburgh.

Prerequisite: two courses in philosophy. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV.

80. Advanced Seminar

06F: 2A 07W: 10A 07S: 2A 07F, 08W: 10A 08S: 2A

This course may be offered in any term and the content varied from year to year according to the interests of the students and the availability of teaching staff. Although intended primarily for students majoring in Philosophy, properly qualified students from other departments may be admitted. In every case admission requires the permission of the instructor. For detailed descriptions, consult the departmental secretary. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV. Seminars for 2005-2007 are as follows:

In 06F, Virtue Ethics. Driver.

In 07W, Ethics and Advanced Technology. Moor.

In 07S, Perception. Kulvicki.

In 07F, Topic to be announced. Brison.

In 08W, Topic to be announced. Thomas.

In 08S, Topic to be announced. Sorensen.

87. Research in Philosophy

All terms: Arrange

The purpose of Philosophy 87 is to provide opportunity for a student to do advanced work on a topic that the student has studied in a regularly offered course, or to study a topic not normally covered in a regularly offered course. In order to enroll in Philosophy 87, a student must prepare a brief (one page) proposal which describes what the student wishes to study and accomplish by taking this research course. All proposals for Philosophy 87 must be reviewed by the faculty of the Department after having been provisionally approved by the faculty member who is the prospective director. This must be done before the beginning of the term in which the course is to be taken. May be taken for more than one course credit, but at most, one election will count toward satisfaction of the requirements of the major. The staff.

89. Honors Program

All terms: Arrange

Open only to Philosophy majors who are participating in the senior year of the Honors Program.