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Information on this website is posted for historical reference only. Please visit the Office of the Registrar for current requirements.

Art History

Chair: Kathleen A. Corrigan

Professors J. M. Jordan, J. Kenseth, A. W. B. Randolph; Associate Professors A. Cohen, K. A. Corrigan, A. F. Hockley, A. Rosenthal; Assistant Professor M. K. Coffey; Senior Lecturer M. E. Heck; Lecturers A. Bokhari, S. E. Kangas; Adjunct Assistant Professors J. L. Carroll, K. O'Rourke; Mellon Fellow S. Wolfskill.

Consult the Department Administrator, Betsy Alexander, for further information.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR

Twelve courses as follows:

Prerequisite: Two courses from Art History 1, 2, or 4.

Requirements: Ten courses consisting of the following: one Studio Art course; six Art History courses, each from a different area (Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Modern, Asian); two seminars in Art History, one of which must be either Art History 85 or 86, which will serve as the Major Culminating Experience; and one other Art History course numbered 16 or higher. (Classical Studies 20, 21, 22, 24, 25, 26 may be substituted for this other course.) N.B.: Art History 1, 2, and 4 may serve only as major prerequisite courses.

Art History majors must complete a Major Worksheet, to be filed with the Department. This sheet is available in the Department office.

MODIFIED MAJOR

The following requirements apply to Art History as either the primary or secondary department of a modified major. In each case the program should constitute an intellectually coherent whole. The Registrar's Office requires a written statement explaining the rationale for the courses selected for the modified major. A copy of this statement must be filed with the Art History Department along with the major card. Modified majors must also file a Modified Major Worksheet with the Department. This sheet is available in the Department office.

Art History Modified

Prerequisite: Two courses from Art History 1, 2, or 4.

Requirements: Seven Art History courses: four that meet the departmental distribution requirement described above (i.e., four out of six categories); one of either Art History 85 or 86 (constituting the Major Culminating Experience); and two other Art History courses numbered 16 or higher. A Studio Art course may be substituted for one of these other courses. An Art History seminar (Art History 80-84) is not required, but is strongly encouraged. N.B.: Art History 1, 2, and 4 may serve only as major prerequisite courses. Four courses, selected in consultation with the Art History adviser, will be taken in the secondary (modifying) department(s), with whatever prerequisites they require.

Another Major Modified with Art History

Prerequisite: One course: Art History 1, 2, or 4.

Requirements: Four Art History courses selected in consultation with the adviser in the primary department.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR

Six courses as follows:

Prerequisite: One or two of Art History 1, 2, or 4.

Requirements: Four Art History courses, which must meet the departmental distribution requirement described above (i.e., four out of six categories). If only one prerequisite is taken, any additional Art History course may be taken as the sixth course. An Art History seminar (Art History 80-84) is not required, but is strongly encouraged. N.B.: Art History 1, 2, and 4 may serve only as prerequisite courses. Art History minors must complete a Minor Worksheet, which is available in the Department office.

TRANSFER CREDIT

Transfer credit is granted at the discretion of the Department Chair.

HONORS PROGRAM

To be eligible for the Honors Program, a student must have achieved by the end of the junior year a 3.2 general College average and a 3.4 average in all Art History courses. A candidate for admission to the Honors Program must, in either the spring preceding or in the fall of his/her senior year, consult with a potential adviser and submit a written and in-person presentation to the whole Art History faculty of his/her proposed Honors project. Admission or non-admission to the Honors Program will subsequently be determined by a vote of the faculty. The Program will consist of an advanced project of study under Art History 90-91 (only one of which may be counted as part of the major), taken during two consecutive terms in the senior year.

Students are strongly encouraged to initiate discussion with an appropriate faculty adviser as early as possible in the junior year.

The Art History Department oversees funds intended to underwrite research for honors projects in the Department. For information see the Department Administrator.

FOREIGN STUDY PROGRAM

In order that students may have an opportunity to study art history in direct contact with original works of art, the Department conducts a Foreign Study Program during the spring term. Based in Rome, one of Europe's richest artistic centers, with a continuous evolution from antiquity to the present, the program examines the monuments of the city, their creators, their patrons, and their various audiences.

This program is open to all students, the prerequisites being Italian 1 (or its equivalent) and Art History 1, plus one of Art History 2, 21, 22, 25, 30, 31, 36, 40, 41, 42, or 45. The program consists of two Art History courses (Art History 10 and 11), which may be counted toward the major, and a course in The Language and Culture of Rome (Art History 12). Interested students should contact Professors Cohen, Corrigan, Kenseth, or Randolph as early as possible in their academic careers.

1. Introduction to the History of Art I

06F, 07F: 11

A study of the basic problems in the understanding and criticism of architecture, sculpture, the graphic arts, and painting in Western and non-Western cultures. The course introduces the student to the basic terminology of the arts, the language of stylistic criticism, and the relationship of the arts to each other and to their historical background.

Art History 1 will concentrate on historical periods prior to 1500. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Cohen, Corrigan.

2. Introduction to the History of Art II

07W, 08W: 11

A survey of art and architecture from 1500 to the present. The course introduces the student to the basic terminology of the arts, the language of stylistic criticism, and the relationship of the arts to each other and to their historical background. Art History 1 is not prerequisite to Art History 2. Priority for enrollment is given to first- and second-year students. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Randolph, Rosenthal.

3. Monuments of Asian Art

Not offered in the period from 06F through 08S

An introduction to the arts of India, China, and Japan through the examination of representative examples of sculpture, architecture, painting, and pottery. In addition to the analysis of stylistic features, this course will emphasize the cultural and religious contexts within which these artistic traditions developed. Dist: ART; WCult: NW. Hockley.

4. History of Architecture

08W: 2

A comparative study of several architectural styles past and present, Western and Non-Western. Consideration will be given to a variety of building types ranging from the monumental to the residential. Dist: ART. Heck, Hockley.

7. First-Year Seminars in Art History

Consult special listings

10. Foreign Study I

07S, 08S: D.F.S.P.

Themes in the History of Roman Art. This course entails the on-site examination of mosaics, paintings and sculptures of particular art historical interest. The approach will be thematic, with emphasis falling on major issues within the History of Art. These may include narrative, iconography, social history, gender, perception, patronage, and formal analysis.

Prerequisite: membership in the Foreign Study Program. Cohen.

11. Foreign Study II

07S, 08S: D.F.S.P.

Roman Architecture. Rome offers a broad array of building types, architectural styles and urban spaces. This course introduces students to the principles of architectural analysis, while simultaneously plotting out a history of Roman architecture and urbanism. The course will begin with the study of ancient architecture. It will, however, focus on the evolution of architectural practices and forms during the late Middle Ages, Renaissance, and Baroque.

Prerequisite: membership in the Foreign Study Program. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. The staff.

12. Foreign Study III

07S, 08S: D.F.S.P.

The Language and Culture of Rome. This course is equivalent to Italian 2. This course aims at expanding students' knowledge of Italian language and culture. It begins with a review of basic verb forms and moves on to explore new tenses and moods. Throughout, students engage in practical exercises geared to improve their oral and written expression, as well as enhance their vocabularies. All classes will be conducted in Italian. Note that this course may not be counted as part of the Art History major.

Prerequisite: membership in the Foreign Study Program. The staff.

16. Special Topics in the History of Art

06F: 10A 07W: 12, 2A 07S: 10A 08W: 11 08S: 10A

In 06F, History of African-American Art (Identical to African and African-American Studies 88). This course surveys African-American artistic production from colonial times to the present day. Topics include slave craftsmanship, 19th century pioneering black artists, turn-of-the-century black intelligentsia, the Negro Renaissance, African-American artists and the WPA, the politics of abstraction, Civil Rights and the Black Arts Movement, feminism, postmodernism, performance art, and subversive strategies in photography. Required readings consist of a small survey textbook and a course packet of critical writings by artists, cultural theorists, and historians. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Wolfskill.

In 07W, Section 1 at 12, Modern Art in Mexico. This course surveys Mexican art from the origins of Mexicanidad in the late colonial period through the Cultural Renaissance after the Revolution, and culminates in 1968, when state violence brought about a critique of cultural nationalism. We will examine painting, sculpture, murals, photography, popular graphics, folk art, architecture, and urban planning. Students will develop skills in visual analysis and learn how to draw meaningful connections between visual culture and the socio-political context of its production. Dist: ART. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Coffey.

In 07W, Section 2 at 2A, Velazquez and the Spanish Baroque. Diego Velasquez, sometimes called the prince of painters, was Spain's preeminent artist in the seventeenth century. This course considers his achievements as a painter, his aspirations as a courtier and gentleman, and his remarkably privileged association with his patron, King Philip IV. The class will study in depth many of Velazquez's key works and examine how he challenged previous notions about the nature of representation, and simultaneously sought to demonstrate the "nobility" of painting. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Kenseth.

In 07S, Arts of India: The Sensual and Sacred: 2300 BCE-Present. This course surveys the history of sculpture, painting and architecture in the Indian sub-continent from 2300 B.C. to present. The role of tradition and patronage in the broader history of art in India is explored through case-studies of the various Arts. A close examination of select works of art will cultivate an informed "lens" through which students can glean an understanding of the multiple strands that make the cultural fabric of the sub-continent rich and enduring. Dist: ART; WCult: NW. Bokhari.

In 08W, Archeology, Religion, and Society in Roman Palestine (Identical to, and described under, Jewish Studies 41, pending faculty approval). Dist: ART; WCult: NW. Kangas.

In 08S, History of Museums and Collecting. Kenseth.

17. Special Topics in the History of Art

07W: 10A, 11 08W: 2A

In 07W, Section 1 at 11, Sacred Art and Architecture of Japan. This course surveys Shinto and Buddhist architecture, sculpture and painting of Japan from the prehistoric to the early modern era. The emphasis will be on the relationship of these arts to the doctrinal, ritual, social and political contexts in which they were created and utilized. Dist: ART; WCult: NW. Hockley.

In 07W, Section 2 at 10A, Abstract Expressionism. Abstract Expressionism, the first American artistic movement to gain international recognition, embodied many conflicts and paradoxes. Steeping themselves in earlier European modernism, the artists nonetheless pursued a style that was to be a-historical in its immediacy. They aimed to address the most profound questions of civilization solely through acts of spontaneity. Lectures, readings, and discussions will examine Pollock, Gorky, DeKooning, Rothko, and others amidst the complexities of American culture of the 1930s, 40s, and 50s. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Jordan.

In 07W, Section 3 at 11, Archaeology of Israel: From Prehistory to the Roman Period (Identical to, and described under, Jewish Studies 41). Dist: ART; WCult: NW. Kangas.

In 08W, A topic in modern art. Jordan.

20. The Art of Ancient Egypt and the Ancient Near East

06F: 10 08W: 10A

A study of painting, sculpture, architecture, and occasionally minor arts in the Near East and Egypt from prehistory through approximately the first millennium B.C.E. The course aims at a parallel treatment of the Egyptian and various Near Eastern civilizations, especially those that developed in Mesopotamia, Anatolia, Syria/Palestine, and Iran. Special attention will be paid to the cultural contacts among different ancient centers at key moments in history, as conjured up by individual monuments. Dist: ART; WCult: NW. Kangas.

21. The Art of Greece: Prehistoric to Classical

Not offered in the period from 06F through 08S

The course treats chronologically the history of Greek art from its beginnings to the end of the fifth century B.C. The principal monuments of architecture, sculpture, and painting will be examined in terms of style, theme, and context. The question will be posed as to how Greek art came to serve Greek society, while some attention will also be given to the ways in which the classical tradition has persistently served later cultures. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Cohen.

22. Late Classical and Hellenistic Art in the Greek World

07F: 10A

The course examines the principal works of painting, sculpture, and architecture of the fourth through the first centuries B.C. This period marks the change from democracy to an age of kings and empire in the Greek world, a change associated with the rise of Macedonia as the dominant political and cultural force in Greece. In the reign of Alexander the Great, Macedonian power—and with it Greek civilization-expanded beyond the borders of Greece to encompass Egypt and the Near East. Particular emphasis will be given to recent discoveries in northern Greece of important monuments associated with the court of Alexander, his father Philip, and some of his immediate successors. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Cohen.

25. Roman Art

06F: 2

A study of architecture, sculpture, painting, and decorative arts in Rome and the Empire from the Republican period through the second century A.D. Such issues as the influence of the Etruscan and Greek traditions, stylistic change and its determinants, and the role of art in Roman society will be considered in relation to both the great public monuments of Republican and Imperial Rome and the works made for private individuals. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Corrigan.

30. Early Christian Art

07X: 12

A study of painting, sculpture, architecture, and the minor arts in the Mediterranean from the third through seventh centuries. Emphasis will be placed on the role of art in late antique society, especially in the process of transformation from the classical to the medieval world. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Corrigan.

31. Byzantine Art

Not offered in the period from 06F through 08S

A study of painting, sculpture, architecture, and the minor arts of Byzantium from the period of Iconoclasm to the fall of Constantinople. Emphasis will be placed on the use of art during this period to express the beliefs and goals of the church and the state and to satisfy private devotional needs. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Corrigan.

32. Early Medieval Art

07S: 2A

Though the 8th-11th centuries are often erroneously known as the "Dark Ages," this course will explore the vibrant life in the emerging northern Europe of Charlemagne and William the Conqueror. Evolving methods of societal organization and identity through religion, nationhood and the cult of personality will be examined through the art and architecture of the period. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Carroll.

33. Gothic Art and Architecture

08S: 2A

Characterized by rising urbanism, a growing middle class and developed political states, the Gothic period combines elements of medieval and early modern worlds. This course will explore the influence of new patrons and institutions on the era's art, the art's reflection of the period's religious and political reality, and the popularity of new, more secular subject matter. The works covered will encompass both massive public projects, such as Chartres Cathedral, and the personal, private taste found on ivory mirror backs. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Carroll.

36. Italian Medieval Art and Architecture, 1200-1400

07W: 2

What is it to picture divinity? What can paintings do that texts cannot? How do public buildings communicate political ideas? This course addresses such questions in relation to the art and architecture of late medieval Italy. We analyze paintings by Duccio, Giotto, and the Lorenzetti, sculptures by the Pisani, and Italian Romanesque and Gothic architecture. We discuss these in relation to mendicant spirituality, communal politics, and the emergence of Italian vernacular literature. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Randolph.

40. Florence 1400-1450: Culture, Politics, Society

07X: 2A

This course advances an interdisciplinary account of Florentine art, architecture, literature, politics, and social life during the crucial years in which the Medici family first came to power. Examining the period's rich historical and historiographical resources, we seek to understand the novel cultural character of Masaccio's paintings, Donatello's sculpture, Brunelleschi's architecture, Alberti's theoretical writings, and Burchiello's poetry, within a thematic structure that also addresses the development of linear perspective, of public political art, and of a new architectural language. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Randolph.

41. Italian Visual Culture, 1450-1500

08W: 10A

In this course we explore various Italian cultural centers—Florence, Mantua, Milan, Naples, Rome, Urbino, and Venice—during the second half of the fifteenth century. While focusing on the cultural particularities of each locale, we also consider an array of broader thematic and generic developments, including mythological painting, pictorial narration, the collection and display of art, gender and spectatorship, the emulation of antiquity, and portraiture. Artists studied include Piero della Francesca, Mantegna, Botticelli, Perugino, Leonardo, and Michelangelo. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Randolph.

42. The High Renaissance and Mannerism in Italy

07W: 10A

A study of the major monuments of painting and sculpture in Italy during the 16th century. The course surveys the classical style of the High Renaissance (beginning with Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, and Giorgione) and then traces the development of Mannerism and Maniera in the work of such artists as Pontormo, Bronzino, and Tintoretto. The art of the reformers at the end of the century is also considered, especially as it looks forward to the Baroque. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Kenseth.

43. Northern Renaissance Art

Not offered in the period from 06F through 08S

A survey of the major monuments of painting, sculpture, and the graphic arts in the Low Countries, Germany, and France, from the late fourteenth century through the Reformation. Content as well as style is examined in the light of its relation to social transformation and the cultural evolution of the period. Emphasis is placed on the work of such significant personalities as the van Eycks, van der Weyden, Bosch, Bruegel, Grünewald, Dürer, and Holbein. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Carroll.

45. Southern Baroque Art

08W: 2A

A survey of painting and sculpture from 1600-1700. This course focuses upon the art of Caravaggio and his followers in Italy and Spain; the Carracci and the development of 17th century classicism; Bernini and the High Baroque, and the art of French visitors to Italy. Special emphasis is given to the relation that the painting and sculpture of this time has to 17th century poetry, theatre, science and the aims of the reformed Catholic Church. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Kenseth.

46. Northern Baroque Art

08S: 2A

Painting in Flanders and Holland from 1600 to 1700. This course considers the naturalistic tradition from Caravaggio's northern followers to the Haarlem School of Hals; the art of Rembrandt; the classical genre of Vermeer and the Delft School; Rubens and the Flemish High Baroque. The growth of specialized genres of painting and the differing aesthetic aims of Dutch and Flemish painters are viewed against the background of the Protestant reformation and the rise of a mercantile society. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Kenseth.

48. Gender, Race and Politics in 18th-century Visual Culture

07S: 10A 07F: 12

The course seeks to examine the interaction in eighteenth-century Europe between the visual arts and politics, social history, literature and philosophy. Emphasizing British, Italian and French visual culture, the course will offer a wide overview by addressing different genres, media, patronage patterns, and contexts of production and reception. The project includes the scrutiny of works by (among others) Hogarth, Reynolds, Kauffman, Watteau, Carriera, Boucher, Fragonard, Vigee-Lebrun and David. Topics include: the changing nature of the public sphere, the representation of history, and ideologies of race, gender, and private and domestic life. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. O'Rourke.

51. Visions of Modernity: The Nineteenth Century

07S: 10

This survey of European art of the nineteenth century examines the central artistic and intellectual movements of the period, focusing especially on Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, and Post-impressionism. Works by individual artists such as Goya, Blake, Turner, Hunt, Friedrich, Gericault, Delacroix, Manet, Cassatt, and Morisot will receive special attention. Topics addressed in this course include the physical reshaping of urban spaces and its implications for the visual arts; the social coding of exterior spaces (the city, parks, nature, and the suburban landscape) and interior spaces (the theater, cafes, and the domestic sphere) in the arts; the impact of industrialization on modern modes of perception; the relevance of the artist's studio and exhibition spaces within the modern metropolis; and the gendering of vision as expressed in such concepts as the flâneur. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Rosenthal.

52. Building America: An Architectural and Social History (Identical to History 34)

06F: 11

This course draws upon recent scholarship in anthropology, archaeology, material culture, social history and architectural history in its review of five centuries of American architecture. Course lectures not only emphasize America's principal architects and their designs, but also summarize the social and cultural forces that shaped the country's built landscape. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Heck.

53. Classic Modernism: Painting and Sculpture 1900-1914

06F: 12 07F: 2

The founding movements of European modernism: Fauvism, Cubism, Futurism, German Expressionism, early abstract art. Sources in Post-Impressionism. Issues of structure and meaning. Special focus on the innovations of Picasso, Matisse, and Kandinsky; extensive readings in artistic manifestoes and contemporaneous criticism. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Jordan.

54. The First Crisis of Modernism: Painting and Sculpture 1914-45

08W: 2

Art after the First World War: International Dada, Surrealism, Suprematism, Russian Constructivism, the Bauhaus. The further development of abstraction: Mondrian, De Stijl, Abstraction-Création, early modernism in New York. The idea of the avant-garde and inter-war struggles for leadership will be studied in theoretical and historical context. Readings in primary sources. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Jordan.

55. Late and Post-Modernism: Art from 1945 to the Present

Not offered in the period from 06F through 08S

Abstract Expressionism (the New York School) as culmination of the modernist tradition. The 'Post-Pollock' problem and reactions. Neo-Dada, Pop Art, Hard Edge, Minimalism, Conceptual, New Realism, Neo-Expressionism, Appropriationism, recent movements. Considerations of Modernism and Post-Modernism; problems of the late avant-garde; and changing relationships between the artist and society. Extensive readings in contemporary theory and criticism. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Jordan.

59. Modern Architecture

07W: 2

Architectural historians disagree about the origins of the modern era. For many, "modern" suggests principally the built works of the 20th century. Others find the great projects of the 19th-century industrial revolution a more suitable place to begin. Still others—as will we—push the beginnings of "modern" architectural thought and practice back to the late 18th century. In this way we place architectural transformation in the context of the great changes taking place in the political, artistic, social and intellectual life of the period.

This course approaches architecture as a cultural product and investigates the relationship between buildings, the ideas embodied in buildings and the cultures that designed them. We will chart the history of modern design from the Age of Enlightenment to the present. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Heck.

60. The Arts of China

07S: 2

Intended as a general introduction to Chinese art and culture, this course will survey major artistic developments from neolithic times to the Republican period. Among the topics to be considered are Shang and Chou bronzes, Buddhist sculpture, and the evolution of landscape painting from the Han to Ch'ing Dynasties. Dist: ART; WCult: NW. Hockley.

64. The Japanese Painting Tradition

07F: 10

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the Japanese painting tradition. Surveying a broad range of themes, formats, and styles and exploring the relationship between indigenous sensibilities and the traditions Japanese artists borrowed from continental Asia and the West, it defines the unique aesthetic experience offered by Japanese sacred and secular painting. Its focus on patronage and studio practice emphasizes the social, political, and cultural processes that underscored important developments in the painting tradition. Dist: ART; WCult: NW. Hockley.

65. Japanese Prints

07S: 11

A survey of the Japanese print tradition from its inception in the seventeenth century through modern prints in the early twentieth century, this course emphasizes the relationship between prints and the political, social, and cultural milieu in which they circulated. The curriculum includes applications of recent critiques and theoretical approaches from fields as diverse as sexuality and gender studies, mass culture and media studies, aesthetics of popular arts, and the sociology of consumption. Dist: ART; WCult: NW. Hockley.

66. The Camera in Nineteenth-Century Asia

Not offered in the period from 06F through 08S

This course examines the use of photography by colonial governments, anthropologists, commercial photographers, and tourists in nineteenth-century Asia. It also takes into account indigenous uses of photography that both conform with and react against Western uses of the medium. Consideration is also given to the diffusion of photographic images into other media including news publications, government documents, academic studies, travelogues, guidebooks, and museum displays. Dist: ART; WCult: NW. Hockley.

67. Contemporary Arts of Asia

08W: 10

This course examines the contemporary art of Asia from a variety of historical, cultural, and critical perspectives. Lectures, readings and discussions range across broad themes such as identity, globalization, trans-nationalism, and feminism and include examination of both traditional and new media. Case studies examine the work of both well-established and emerging young artists. This course is designed to equip students with the critical skills necessary to appreciate, discuss, and analyze contemporary Asian art. Dist: ART; WCult: NW. Hockley.

70. Social History of North American Art, Part I

07W, 08S: 10

This course surveys visual culture in North America from the 16th century to 1900. In addition to the development of Anglo-American culture and identity, the course also explores the influence of Dutch, Spanish, and French settlers as well as Native American, African, and Asian contributions to North American art. We will consider painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, graphic art, folk traditions, and material culture with special emphasis on race, nation, gender, and class. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Coffey.

71. Social History of North American Art, Part II

07S: 10

This course surveys visual culture in North America over the 20th century. While the United States will be emphasized, we will also consider art produced in Canada and Mexico. In addition to mainstream artists, we will also explore art produced by marginalized communities, in particular African Americans, Native Americans, Asian Americans, Mexican Americans, women, and Queer artists. Genres covered include: painting, sculpture, mural art, performance, installation, photography, and political graphics. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Coffey.

75. Twentieth Century Art from Latin America

08S: 12

This course surveys works of art produced by Latin Americans during the 20th century. We will approach this vast topic through case studies of the major figures and avant-garde movements in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru, Puerto Rico, Uruguay, and the United States. We will examine how national identity, racial formation, class difference, gender inequality, political struggle, and state violence have been addressed by artists from the region and in diaspora. Dist: ART. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Coffey.

80, 81, 82, 83, 84. Advanced Seminars in Art History

Intensive study of special fields in art history. Open to all classes without prerequisite (except as noted), but with the permission of the instructor.

80. 07W: 2A. The Sacred Image in Early Byzantine Art. The seminar will examine the development of the icon as a devotional object primarily in Byzantium but also in Rome in the 6th through 9th centuries. Topics of discussion will be the theory and definition of icons, their relationship to contemporary theological debates, their liturgical and popular functions, and problems of iconography. Corrigan.

81. Not offered in the period from 06F through 08S

82. 07F: 2A. Randolph.

83. 07S: 2A. Mexican Muralism. Coffey.

84. 08W: 2A. A topic in ancient art. Cohen.

85. Senior Seminar in Art Historical Method and Practice

06F, 07F: 3A. Dist: ART. Cohen.

86. Senior Seminar in Art Historical Method and Practice

07W, 08W: 3A. Dist: ART. Rosenthal.

89. Independent Study

All terms: Arrange

Independent Study is intended for advanced students who have demonstrated their ability to do independent research in art history and who wish to study some topic in greater depth than is possible in a regularly scheduled course or seminar. The Independent Study project should be preceded by at least one Art History course in an area related to the topic under consideration, and may even develop out of that course. A student interested in undertaking Independent Study must first submit a proposal to the faculty member with whom he or she wishes to study. Assuming agreement by that faculty member, the proposal will then be reviewed by the entire Art History faculty. Ordinarily, this must be done in the term immediately preceding the term in which the Independent Study course will be taken. The Independent Study course cannot be used to fulfill any of the requirements for the Art History major or minor.

90-91. Honors

06F, 07W, 07S, 07F, 08W, 08S: Arrange

A sequence of two courses devoted to independent research and the writing of a thesis or execution of a project under direction of a departmental adviser. Students admitted to and participating in the departmental honors program must take these courses in consecutive terms of the senior year.

Prerequisite: consult the statement of the Art History Honors Program. Only one of these courses may be counted as part of the major in Art History. Corrigan.