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Psychological and Brain Sciences

Chair: Todd F. Heatherton

Professors A. S. Clark, K. N. Dunbar, M. S. Gazzaniga, S. T. Grafton, T. F. Heatherton, H. C. Hughes, J. G. Hull, G. C. Jernstedt, J. S. Taube, G. L. Wolford; Professor Emeritus R. E. Kleck; Associate Professors C. P. Cramer, J. M. Groh, W. M. Kelley; Assistant Professors A. A. Baird, D. J. Bucci, Y. E. Cohen, P. U. Tse, P. J. Whalen; Senior Lecturer J. F. Pfister; Visiting Professor T. S. Lorig; Visiting Assistant Professors S. Estow, H. G. Foster, J. L. Scheiner; Adjunct Professor J. A. Corson, M. J. Detzer, M. J. Sateia; Adjunct Assistant Professors J. H. Fanos, H. N. Hersh; Research Professor R. Elliott; Research Associate Professor J. D. Van Horn.

Normally, students sign up for the major during their fifth term in residence. Individuals can apply to participate in the Honors Program as early as the spring term of the junior year but no later than the fall term of the senior year (see ‘Honors Program’ below).

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEPARTMENTAL MAJOR

Prerequisites: Psychology 1 or 6 and Psychology 10. Students must obtain a grade no lower than C in Psychology 1. Students who fail to obtain a C or better in Psychology 1 may still complete a major in Psychological and Brain Sciences in the event that they earn C or better in their next two Psychology courses. Psychology 10 may be taken concurrently with Psychology 1. As a course prerequisite to the major, Psychology 10 should be taken at or before the time of declaring the major; otherwise it is to be taken in the first offering following sign-up for the major. Though we recommend against substituting, some other statistics courses are permitted as alternatives to Psychology 10, specifically: Economics 10, Government 10, Mathematics 10 and Sociology 10. Exceptions to the prerequisites above will be considered by the Undergraduate Committee.

Requirements: The major requirements are as follows: The minimum major consists of one required course (Psychology 11) and seven electives. At least two of these seven must be numbered in the 20s, one 50 or higher, and another 60 or higher; the 60 or higher requirement constitutes the Culminating Experience requirement in Psychological and Brain Sciences. Of the two courses in the 20s, one must come from the set 22, 23, 24, or 25 and the other must come from the set 21, 26, or 28. Neither Psychology 88 nor 89 may be used to satisfy the 60 or above requirement. With prior approval, credit for up to two electives may be transferred from another institution but credit for the 50 and above and 60 and above courses must be obtained at Dartmouth. Transfer of credits must be approved prior to taking the course(s). Deadline for this approval is the start of the term prior to the term in which the course to be transferred is taught (i.e. start of Winter term for courses taught in a Spring term) On occasion, by advanced planning and approval only, one of the seven electives may be taken from other related departments. Certain graduate courses may be taken by qualified and advanced undergraduates if permission is obtained from the course instructor. Majors must be approved by a faculty adviser. Advisers are randomly assigned by the Administrative Assistant in the Department Offices.

The course numbers have meaning. Courses numbered 10 and below do not carry major credit. Courses numbered in the 20s are introductions to particular sub-areas in psychology. Courses in the 40s, and 50s are more advanced than 20s level courses and generally have a narrower focus. Courses in the 60s are advanced laboratory courses. Courses in the 80s are upper level seminars.

The Department recommends that majors take more upper level (50, 60 and 80 level) courses than we require for the major.

THE MODIFIED MAJOR

As a consequence of some years of experience after the introduction of the Minor, the Department has decided to discontinue the Modified Major where Psychology is the major department.We will continue to allow students who wish to have Psychology as the secondary part of a Modified Major (e.g., Biology Modified with Psychology) to do so.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR

The Minor will consist of 6 courses: Psychology 1 or 6 (prerequisite) plus five additional courses numbered 10 or above. Two of the five must be numbered in the 50s or above. While two of the six may be transfers, transfers cannot count toward the 50 or above requirement. Students interested in a minor should see the Chair of the Undergraduate Committee.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR AND MINOR IN NEUROSCIENCE

See the section entitled Neuroscience for information regarding these interdepartmental major and minor programs.

HONORS PROGRAM

Qualified students majoring in Psychological and Brain Sciences have the opportunity to participate in an Honors Program that provides individualized advanced instruction and research experience in psychology.

Individuals may apply for honors work as early as the spring term of the junior year, but not later than the fall term of the senior year. Eligibility for honors is a 3.30 average in the major and a 3.0 average overall. Students interested in doing honors work must consult with the Chair of the Departmental Undergraduate Committee and obtain an honors packet from the Administrative Assistant in 103 Moore Hall.

The Psychological and Brain Sciences Department offers two fellowships for students who are interested in becoming involved in research projects: the Benjamin J. Benner ‘69 Undergraduate Research Support Fellowship, and the Lincoln Filene Undergraduate Fellowship in Human Relations. The fellowships are usually awarded to students to support research activities during a leave term that could serve as a foundation for honors research. Most often this is the summer preceding the student’s senior year. Information about the fellowships and the application process may be obtained from the Department offices.

An honors student must fulfill course requirements of the major and the following additional requirements.

1. The completion of an acceptable thesis based upon at least two terms of laboratory or field research that is carried out under the auspices of Psychology 89 and is under the supervision of a department faculty member. The Honors thesis will entail an independent and individual project. Furthermore, the thesis project must be read and approved by the Thesis Committee.

2. Honors students will present their research to departmental faculty and interested others during the latter part of the spring term of their senior year.

3. Midway through the winter term preceding the completion of the thesis, all honors students must submit a prospectus of their thesis to their advisor and the Undergraduate Committee. The prospectus shall include a brief description of the rationale for the research, methods used, analyses to be employed and implications of the expected results.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DOCTOR’S DEGREE (PH.D.)

The Department offers graduate training leading to the Ph.D., and the program emphasizes acquaintance with the basic psychological processes that form the core of experimental psychology. Students are encouraged in their research to address problems of broad significance and to be knowledgeable about the theory that makes breadth coherent.

The requirements for the Ph.D. degree in Psychological and Brain Sciences are as follows:

1. A passing grade in the required statistical courses (100 and 101), the proseminar (112, 113 and 114), and in five additional graduate seminars.

2. Completion of the teaching apprenticeship program.

3. A passing grade in a specialist examination containing both written and oral parts, typically by the end of the second year.

4. Fulfillment of the two-year-residence requirement.

5. Completion of independent research and a dissertation; a defense of the dissertation; and presentation of the dissertation research in a public oral colloquium.

6. For more specific details regarding the program see the ‘Departmental Guide to Graduate Program.’

PSYCHOLOGICAL AND BRAIN SCIENCES DEPARTMENT WEBSITE

Please check our website at http://www.dartmouth.edu/~psych/ for further information, including updated course offerings, PBS Bulletins and Departmental Colloquia.

COURSE OFFERINGS

1. Introductory Psychology

05F, 06W, 06S, 06F, 07W, 07S: 10

A course designed to serve as a general introduction to the science of human behavior. Emphasis will be placed upon the basic psychological processes of perception, learning, and motivation as they relate to personality, individual differences, social behavior, and the behavior disorders. Dist: SOC. The staff.

6. Introduction to Neuroscience

06W, 07W: 10A

This course provides students with an introduction to the fundamental principles of neuroscience. The course will include sections on cellular and molecular neuroscience, neurophysiology, neuroanatomy, and cognitive neuroscience. Neuroscience is a broad field that is intrinsically interdisciplinary. As a consequence, the course draws on a variety of disciplines, including biochemistry, biology, physiology, pharmacology, (neuro)anatomy and psychology. The course will begin with in-depth analysis of basic functions of single nerve cells. We will then consider increasingly more complex neural circuits, which by the end of the course will lead to a analysis of the brain mechanisms that underlie complex goal-oriented behavior. Dist: SCI. Cohen.

7. First-Year Seminars in Psychology

Consult special listings. This course does not carry major credit.

10. Experimental Design, Methodology, and Data Analysis Procedures

06W, 06S: 9L06X: 11 07S: 9L

This course is concerned with the various ways whereby empirical information is obtained and analyzed in psychology. Coverage will include the design of experiments and surveys, their execution, and the statistical tasks required to make sense of the data obtained using these techniques. There will be both lecture and discussion sections; independent projects will be required. The discussions and projects will include everyday applied problems as well as more traditional psychological problems.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6 (may be taken concurrently). Because of the large overlap in material covered, no student may receive credit for more than one of the courses Biology 9, Economics 10, Geography 10, Government 10, Mathematics 10, Mathematics 15 or 45, Psychology 10, Social Sciences 10, or Sociology 10 except by special petition. Dist: QDS. Hull, Lorig.

11. Laboratory in Psychological Science

06W: 2A06S: 11 06X: 1007S: 11Laboratory

This laboratory course will provide a general introduction to the experimental methods of psychological science. Lectures will provide an overview of experimental techniques in four content areas (behavioral neuroscience, sensation/perception, cognitive/cognitive neuroscience, and social/applied psychology). The focus will be on how psychological scientists pursue research questions using diverse techniques, such as functional brain imaging, reaction time, psychopharmacology, self-reports, and survey methods. Laboratory exercises will complement the lecture material. Ethical issues as they pertain to psychological research will also be addressed.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6 and 10. Dist SLA. Bucci, Pfister, Whalen.

21. Perception

05F, 06F: 11

Our senses are our windows to the world, and the scientific study of the senses is one of the oldest sub-disciplines in experimental psychology. This course introduces students to the fundamental workings of our senses of vision, hearing, touch, taste and smell. The course includes careful consideration of experimental methodology as well as content.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6. Dist: SCI. Hughes.

22. Learning

05F, 06F: 12

This course considers the fundamental principles of learning and the implications of these principles for the understanding of human behavior. Empirical and theoretical issues in learning are covered through examination of laboratory data and their extension to human behavior in complex life situations in the natural environment.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6. Dist: SOC. Jernstedt.

23. Social Psychology

06W, 07W: 11

This course is an introduction to contemporary psychological theory and research on social behavior. Specific topics include self-presentation, nonverbal behavior, interpersonal relations, conformity, persuasion, aggression, altruism, and group dynamics. Within these contexts, emphasis is placed on the importance of both personality and situational factors as determinants of social behavior.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6. Dist: SOC. Hull.

24. Personality and Abnormal Psychology

05F, 06S, 06F: 9L07S: 10

This course is concerned mainly with the various types of psychopathology, their diagnosis, etiology, and treatment. Personality theories will be discussed whenever they help to understand specific issues in abnormal behavior. The question of what constitutes solid mental health will also be examined. Case histories, films, and guest lectures by mental health professionals are features of this course, and each student is required either to attend a small discussion group, write a paper, or complete some other independent project.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6. Dist: SOC. Hersh, Scheiner.

25. Developmental Psychology (Identical to Education 18)

06S, 06X, 07S: 10A

We will examine the social and cognitive development of children from infancy to adolescence. We will also consider the implications of psychological research and theory for parenting, and for social and legal policies that affect young children. Film and videotape materials will be used to illustrate examples of infant and child behavior.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6. Dist: SOC. Baird, Pettito.

26. Physiological Psychology

06W, 07W:12

Designed for majors and non-majors, the course provides an introduction to the biological processes underlying behavior. Basic neuroanatomy, cellular physiology, and endocrinology will first be outlined. Such psychological concepts as motivation, emotion and learning will then be related to neural function and organization and to a variety of physiological correlates.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6. Dist: SCI. Cramer.

28. Cognition (Identical to Cognitive Science 2)

06S, 07S: 2

An introduction to the study of thought, memory, language, and attention from the point of view of information processing. In surveying research in cognitive psychology, substantial contact is made with related cognitive sciences, such as artificial intelligence, linguistics, neuroscience, and contemporary philosophy. In the course of examining general principles of cognition, the following topics are discussed: mental imagery; concepts; reasoning; discourse; monetary and courtroom decision making; eye-witness testimony; social attribution and stereotyping; language in chimpanzees; expert systems; the relationship between human and computer intelligence; the neural basis of cognition; the relationship between information processing and conscious experience; and the philosophical foundations of cognitive science.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1or 6 or Computer Science 5. Dist: SOC. Kelley.

36. Experimental Curriculum Course

Not offered in the period from 05F through 07S

44. Psychology and Business

06W: 10A

This course will focus on psychological aspects of managerial processes such as motivation, conflict resolution, power, communication, leadership, and decision-making in perspective for managing and working in organizations.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6. Dist: SOC. Estow.

50-54. Issues in Psychology

Although the general topic remains the same, the content of these courses changes depending on the instructor in the course.

Note: Enrollment in courses numbered 50 or above is limited. Therefore, a student desiring one of these courses should elect it promptly.

50. Issues in Neuropsychology

05F: 206W: 1106S: 2A

Courses with this number consider topics that bring to bear knowledge in the fields of psychology, neurology, and physiology. Topics are treated at an intermediate level and the focus will be on topics not covered in detail in Psychology 26 and 65. The selection of issues is at the discretion of the instructor. Enrollment limited. Dist: SCI.

In 05F, Sensorimotor Transformations. This course addresses the questions of how, when, and where sensory information is transformed into goal-directed motor actions. This course will examine these issues that are fundamental for understanding the brain’s involvement in behavior. Topics to be examined include, but are not limited to multimodal integration, reference frame transformation, the formation of decisions, stimulus selection and salience, and motor planning and control.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6. Cohen.

In 06W, Exotic Sensory Systems. Humans have 5 special senses (vision, hearing, touch, taste and smell) and a variety of ‘internal senses’ that provide information about the state of our body and internal organs. However, some animals posses senses that are unlike anything that humans can experience. Examples include echolocation, celestial and geomagnetic navigational systems, and bioelectricity. This course explores the discovery and operation of these ‘exotic’ senses, highlighting both the similarities and differences with our own more familiar sensory modalities.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6 and 21 or instructor’s permission. Limited to 35 students. Hughes.

In 06S, Sleep and Sleep Disorders. This course will explore the basic biological mechanisms of sleep and circadian rhythms, including neuroanatomical, neurophysiological and chemical aspects of sleep/wake, as well as the relevant behavioral and social aspects of normal sleep. The course will then build upon this basic understanding of normal sleep and circadian rhythm to develop an overview of major sleep and circadian rhythm disorders, which include anatomical (e.g., sleep apnea) neurophysiological/chemical (e.g., narcolepsy), circadian (e.g., shift work or delayed sleep phase), and behavioral (e.g., conditioned insomnia) disturbances, as well as the interaction between sleep and other psychological, psychiatric and medical conditions. The critical importance of sleep to adequate daytime neuropsychological functioning will be elucidated through exploration of the impact of sleep deprivation and disorders. The social, public policy and economic issues pertinent to sleep and circadian rhythms will also be discussed.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6 and 24 or 26. Enrollment limited to 35 students. Sateia.

51. Issues in Information Processing

06S: 2

Courses with this number consider topics from the areas of perception, memory, cognition, and quantitative models from the point of view of information processing. Material is treated at an intermediate level on a set of issues not covered in Psychology 21 and 28. Selection of issues is left to the discretion of the instructor, but specific emphasis is given to methodology. Enrollment limited. Dist: SOC.

In 06S2, The Psychology of Thinking, Reasoning, Problem Solving, and Creativity. The ways that we think, form concepts, and reason are key aspects of being human. In this course, we explore the way we form concepts, how we solve problems, the roots of creativity, the development of thinking, as well as examine the roles of the brain and evolution in understanding these deeply human capacities.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6. Enrollment limited to 35 students. Dunbar.

52. Issues in Learning and Development

06W: 10A06S: 12

Courses with this number consider several important sub-fields of learning and psychological development. Material is treated at an intermediate level on a set of issues not covered in Psychology 22 and 25. Selection of issues is left to the discretion of the instructor, but they will be selected with emphasis upon the psychological principles emerging from the study of humans and animals in the context of learning, early experience, and maturation. Dist: SOC.

In 06W, Language Acquisition (Identical to Education 58 and Linguistics 10). Human language is one of the most spectacular of the brain’s cognitive capacities, one of the most powerful instruments in the mind’s tool kit for thought, and one of the most profound means we as a species use in social, emotional, and cultural communications. Yet the break-neck speed and seemingly “effortless�? way that young children acquire language remain its most miraculous characteristic. We will discover the biological capacities and the important social, family, and educational factors that, taken together, make this feat possible and establish the basic facts of language acquisition, involving children’s babbling, phonology, early vocabulary, morphology, syntax, semantics, and discourse knowledge, as well as their early gestural and pragmatic competence. Prevailing theoretical explanations and research methods will be explored. Critically, we will evaluate the efficacy of how language is presently taught to young children in schools in light of the facts of human language acquisition.

Open to all classes. Petitto.

In 06S, Animal Learning and Behavior. This course will survey the study of animal behavior, beginning with a consideration of animal learning theory and evolutionary theory. Topics will include reproductive behavior, self-maintenance and defensive behaviors, and social interactions in a wide range of species.

Prerequisites: Psychology 1 or 6. Cramer.

53. Issues in Social Psychology

05F: 10A, 1106W, 06S: 10A

Courses with this number consider several important sub-fields of social psychology. Material is treated at an intermediate level on a set of issues that are not covered in Psychology 23 and 37. Selection of issues is left to the discretion of the instructor, but specific emphasis is given to individual and group attitudes, modes of interpersonal communication, and behavior control in humans and animals. Dist: SOC.

In 05F and 06S at 10A (Section 1), Psychology of Decision Making. Life is full of decisions. We make dozens each day, some trivial and some that shape our future. We will cover theories of optimal decision making and we will look at how people actually make decisions. We will examine people making decisions in isolation and people making decisions with and in opposition to other people. We will consider ways to improve decision making. Topics will include: Utilities, uncertainty, heuristics, bias, framing, overconfidence, cooperation, competition, negotiation and so forth.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6, 10 and either 23 or 28. Enrollment limited to 35 students. Wolford.

In at 05F at 11 (Section 2), Interpersonal Relationships. This course examines the initiation, maintenance, and termination of personal relationships. Beginning with attachment theory and research, we will explore the making and breaking of intimate relationships. Specific topics will include attraction and affiliation, intimacy and loneliness, jealousy and envy, friendships and dating relationships, family relationships (siblings, parents, children), mate selection, communication and conflict resolution. The course will examine how relationships (e.g. sibling) change over time. We will explore various sources of trauma to relationships, including community trauma (natural disasters and man-made), family violence (physical and sexual abuse), divorce, illness or death of a parent, and illness or death of a sibling. The course will review contemporary theory and research on trauma in relationships, from childhood and adolescence to adulthood. Prerequisite: Psychology 1 and 23. Enrollment limited to 35 students. Fanos.

In 06W at 10A, Emotion. From psychology to neuroscience to ethology to philosophy, numerous scholars have attempted to define what qualifies as an emotion. In this course we will take from each of these disciplines to better understand emotional life and its dysfunction. We will augment this information by learning how the brain supports emotional processing. And, then, we will be in a better position to answer the really big questions. What is an emotion? How do we study them? Who has emotions? Do you? Does your neighbor? Do German Shepherds? How do you know?

Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6 and 23 or 28. Whalen.

54. Issues in Applied Psychology

05F: 2A, 10A06W: 2A, 10A

Courses with this number consider several important sub-fields of applied psychology, such as environmental psychology and consumer behavior. Material is treated at an intermediate level. Selection of issues is left to the discretion of the instructor, but they will be selected with emphasis upon the extension of established psychological principles to problems of contemporary society. Dist: SOC.

In 05F at 2A (Section 1), Forensic Psychology. This course explores topics at the interface of the profession of psychology and the criminal justice system. Seminar discussions and lectures will cover topics such as: psychological evaluation and treatment in a hospital/ legal context, ethics and psychologists as an expert witness, competency to stand trial, and neuropsychological evaluation and criminal responsibility. Students will review and research in the areas of the “detection of malingering�? and “predictions of dangerousness among psychopaths and sexual offenders. [The Actuarial Data Approach versus the Clinical Judgments Approach will be compared.] Students will prepare papers on one of these two topics and present them as part of a panel presentation.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6. Enrollment limited to 35 students. Foster.

In 05F at 10A and 06W at 2A (Section 2), Health Psychology. This course will explore the role of psychology and health. We will review both empirical/research and clinical psychology contributions to 1) chronic physical illness; and 2) health promotion. This course utilizes a multi-model and outside-of-the-classroom/DHMC learning opportunities. Through in-depth study of diabetes, cancer, cystic fibrosis, and chronic physical pain, we will explore the impact of illness on the individual and family, and the role of “treatment�? issues including adherence/self-management and the role of the doctor/patient relationship in successful outcomes.

Prerequisites: Psychology 1 or 6 permission of instructor. Detzer.

In 06W 10A (Section 3), Introduction to Cognitive and Behavior Therapies. This course introduces strategies involved in the application of learning principles to the assessment and treatment of certain human behavioral problems, and the field of behavior therapy. The first part of the course will include lectures and selected readings, while the remainder will be taught in a seminar format. Students will give brief oral presentations on selected topics and will study in depth specific areas in behavior therapy.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6. Enrollment limited to 35 students. Corson.

59. An Introduction to Psychological Assessment

06W, 07W: 9L

This course is an overview of current approaches to the psychological assessment of individual differences in development, intelligence, personality and special abilities. It will consider the strengths, weaknesses, and issues associated with each approach and will cover the basic principles of test construction, evaluation, and interpretation. The course will also include a history of psychological testing, and a consideration of the important theoretical, ethical and social issues which psychological assessment has raised.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6 and 10 or its equivalent. Enrollment limited to 35 students. Dist: SOC. Scheiner.

60-68. Laboratories in Psychology

Enrollment in laboratory courses is limited and by permission only. Permission may be obtained during an annual sign-up period that runs the first two weeks in May. Further information may be obtained at the Psychology Department office.

60. Principles of Human Brain Mapping with fMRI

06W, 07W: 2ALaboratory

This course is designed to introduce students to the theoretical and practical issues involved in conducting functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments of cognitive and behaviorally-related brain principles underlying the fMRI signal change, as well as the considerations for experimental design. The course will include firsthand exposure to the scanning environment and data collection procedures. Participants will be provided conceptual and hands-on experience with image processing and statistical analysis. At the completion of this course, it is expected that participants will be prepared to critique, design, and conduct fMRI studies; appreciate limitations and potentials of current fMRI methods and techniques; and better understand the broad range of expertise required in an fMRI research program. The course is designed to provide the participant with intensive, hands-on instruction. As a result, enrollment will be limited to 20 people. Knowledge of MR physics, signal processing, or the UNIX/linux operating system is not a prerequisite. Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6, 10, one course from the 20’s series, and permission of the instructor. Dist: TLA. Van Horn.

62. Experimental Study of Learning

Not offered in the period from 05F through 07S

63. Experimental Study of Social Behavior

05F: 11

This course treats experimental methodology in the study of motivation, social behavior and personality. Of special interest is the influence of motivation upon interpersonal and social behavior. Theoretical issues and methodological problems are dealt with in the context of individual laboratory research on selected topics.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6, 1, 11, 23, and permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited. Dist: SOC. Estow.

64. Sensory Psychology

06W: 9; Laboratory M 3-5

All knowledge of the physical world comes to us via our senses. This course explores the capacities and limitations of our sensory systems and the biological mechanisms that determine those capacities. Topics include the transduction of physical stimuli to neural messages and the encoding and decoding of those messages. The laboratory serves to acquaint students with the various methods employed in the study of sensory processes.

Prerequisites: Psychology 1 or 3 or Biology 34 or another course approved by the instructor and permission of the instructor. Dist: SLA. Groh.

65. Physiology of Behavior

06S, 07S: 10; Laboratory Tu morning or afternoon or W 1:00-4:30

The primary focus of this course is the physiological basis of behavior. Such topics as localization of function, neural models, and the physiological bases of sensory/motor systems, learning/memory, spatial cognition, and emotion are considered. The laboratory introduces the student to the anatomy and physiology of the mammalian central nervous system and to some of the principal techniques used in behavioral neuroscience. Laboratories are scheduled for a 3.5 hour period on Tuesday morning or afternoons; students will be assigned to one of these two laboratory sections. Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6 and 26 or Biology 34, and permission of the instructor. Dist: SLA. Taube.

67. Experimental Study of Animal Behavior

Not offered in the period from 05F through 07S

68. Experimental Study of Human Perception and Cognition

Not offered in the period from 05F through 07S

80-87. Seminars in Psychology

The topic areas for seminars may change from year to year. Course descriptions of seminars are available from the Psychology Department office. Enrollment in seminars is limited and by permission only. Enrollment priority is given to senior majors. Permission may be obtained during an annual signup period that runs the first two weeks in May. Further information may be obtained at the Psychology Department office or from the individual instructor.

80. Neuroscience Seminar and Annual Meeting

05F: 2A

This advanced undergraduate seminar course will explore topics and issues that are on the cutting edge in the field of neuroscience. We will select and discuss several topics that are the subject of presentations at the upcoming Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience. The class will then join the instructor at the annual meeting in Washington, DC (Nov 12-16) and attend these presentations. Students will also select and attend presentations of personal interest and keep a journal of what they learn at the meeting. Upon returning, we will first discuss the assigned presentations and the meeting in general. Subsequently, students will prepare and deliver presentations on a neuroscience topic of personal interest using information and research obtained at the annual meeting. Students will also prepare an in-depth final paper on their presentation topic. Prerequisites Psychology 26, 65 or Biology 34. Permission of instructor; limit of 15. Bucci.

80. Action Memory

06W: 10

We have almost unlimited capacity to learn new physical skills. How does this learning occur and where is this motor knowledge stored in the brain? What leads to better skill learning and why? We will explore these questions with contemporary literature and brain imaging experiments. Permission of instructor. Grafton.

80. Looking at Sounds, Feeling Taste, and Hearing Smells (Section 1)

06S: 3A

Our sensory systems work in concert to produce a percept of a unified world. In this seminar, we will explore how our brains fuse the information gleaned by the different sensory systems to produce this unified percept. Prerequisites: Psychology 21 or 64. Permission of instructor. Groh.

80. Neuroethology (Section 2)

06S: 10A

Neuroethology is a blend of two different disciplines, neuroscience and animal behavior. The nervous system is the biological interface between an animal and its environment. This interface controls what an animal perceives, how it learns and how it reacts to relevant stimuli in its environment. This seminar will explore the relationship between behavior and neuroscience using a number of different animal systems, ranging from insects to primates. We will discuss many different types of behaviors, from simple reflexes and locomotion to complex cognitive behaviors such as spatial navigation, establishment of dominance hierarchies, evolution of mating behaviors, animal learning and communication. Permission of instructor. Cohen.

82. Cognitive and Behavioral Learning Science

06W: 10A

The focus of this seminar is on understanding principles in the cognitive and behavioral sciences as they describe the process of learning that occurs during formal education. What are the classic and the contemporary theories and data about the learning process that must guide the development of effective learning methods? How can we tell what works? How can these psychological research findings be used to extract key principles for the design of future learning? We will evaluate existing methods and consider new methods for optimizing learning. Research will be drawn from such areas of psychology as cognitive, behavioral, and educational neuroscience, learning theory, and instructional design theory. We will study and employ quantitative analysis techniques to examine selected learning outcomes. We will each analyze and publish investigations of an area on the leading edge of research on human learning. Permission of instructor. Jernstedt.

83. Stereotypes, Prejudice, and Discrimination

05F: 3A

This seminar is an examination of stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination in the United States from a social psychological perspective. þWe will examine the evolutionary bases of these processes, the social cognition of stereotyping, and how these processes relate to various groups, noting similarities and differences along the way.þ We will then shift our focus to the portrayal of different groups in the media and the psychological effects of stigma.þ We will conclude with consideration of applied solutions to inter-group conflict. Estow.

83. Social Cognition: The Psychology of Thinking about Other People

06W: 3A

Although many other animals engage in some form of social behavior, humans are set apart by the sheer scale and complexity of our social interactions. A central part of navigating the social world is the ability to make sense of and predict the behavior of other people (e.g., Why did John leave the party early? What will others think if I wear this Hawaiian shirt to class?). But how exactly does one gain insight into the mind of another person? This course will examine how one person infers the thoughts and feelings of others, predicts what they will do in certain situations, forms impressions of others’ personalities, and manages to engage in culturally-appropriate social behavior. In doing so, we will examine a range of topics, including research on stereotypes and prejudice, knowledge about the self, the development of social skills in children, social deficits in autism and related disorders, and the underlying neural basis of these abilities. Mitchell.

83. The Self

06S: 2A

A unitary sense of self that exists across time and place is a central feature of human experience. Understanding the nature of self - what it is and what it does - has challenged scholars for many centuries. Although most people intuitively understand what is meant by the term self, definitions have tended toward the philosophical and metaphysical. Efforts at creating more formal definitions have largely been unsuccessful, as many features of self are empirically murky, difficult to identify and assess using objective methods. Yet the phenomenological experience of self is highly familiar to everyone. So, at issue is not whether the self exists, but how best to study it. This course will survey contemporary approaches to understanding the self, with a strong emphasis on approaches from social psychology. We will consider self’s development, its cognitive and affective components, motives related to it, and how it is regulated. We will consider its functional basis, examining both its adaptive and maladaptive consequences. We will also examine its neurological basis, including case studies of people with disorders of self. Prerequisites: Psychology 1, 23, or Permission of instructor. Dist. SOC. Heatherton.

84. Abilities, Giftedness and Genius

05F: 10A

This seminar will consider the nature and nurture of mental abilities, the different kinds of these, both general and special, and their social and economic implications. It will also examine abilities at the level of giftedness, particularly the meaning and development of giftedness in its many forms. Permission of instructor. Elliott.

84. Psychology and Law

06S: 2A

This course will cover certain topics about which psychological theory and data are adduced to affect the deliberations of courts, juries, and other fact-finding or policy-making bodies. Among these topics are the question of the place of psychological science in the law, illustrated primarily by considering questions about the jury both as subject and recipient of scientific research; the role and relevance of tests and other psychological analysis in debates about high stakes decisions in the education system generally and college admissions particularly, and questions about group differences in test scores and attempts to cope with them (e.g., the affirmative action debate); the psychology of sex differences and several legal issues concerning occupational segregation, pay differentials, career advancement, sexual harassment, Title IX, military service, etc.; and possibly other issues (e.g., repressed memory, profiling, insanity, etc.). Permission of instructor. Dist: SOC. Elliott.

85. Non-Verbal Aspects of Social Interaction

06W: 10A, 2

The seminar will focus on the nonverbal and paraverbal dimensions of human communication. Particular attention will be given to research which has examined the role of gaze behavior, facial expressions of emotion and appearance cues in social relationships. Video records of social interaction will be used to demonstrate and illustrate the various ways in which nonverbal behaviors play an important role in interpersonal dynamics. A mid-term exam, a seminar paper and participation in class discussions are the mechanisms through which the student’s mastery of the seminar materials is assessed. Permission of instructor. Dist: SOC. Kleck.

87. Nature and Nurture

05F: 10A

One of the continuing discussions of our era is whether differences between individuals can be attributed to inherent characteristics or to environmental influences, in other words, the nature-nurture debate. We will examine writings representing the spectrum of arguments, particularly those taking modern combinatorial or interactionist positions. Analyses of both animal and human behaviors will be included. Students will select a particular behavioral domain of interest to them and review current information about the sources of variation in that behavior. Permission of instructor. Dist: SOC. Cramer.

88. Independent Research

All terms: Arrange

This course is designed to enable qualified students to engage in independent laboratory or field research under the direction of a faculty member. Students may take one to three terms of Independent Research. No more than two terms of 88, 89, or a combination of 88s and 89s may count toward the eight required courses for the major. This course may not be used to fulfill the upper-level (60 or above) major requirement.

Under special circumstances, a student may submit a written petition to the Undergraduate Committee for permission to enroll in Psychology 88 for the purpose of doing library research for one term only. Such a petition must be endorsed by a faculty member. Non-majors may request exemption from normal prerequisites and other requirements of Psychology 88.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6, 10 and 11. Written permission from the advisor, and then written permission from the Chair of the Undergraduate Committee. The staff.

89. Honors Research

All terms: Arrange

This course is designed to enable especially qualified students, usually seniors, to engage in independent laboratory or field research under the direction of a faculty member. Students may take two or three terms of Honors Research, but no more than two terms of 88, 89, or a combination of 88s and 89s may count toward the eight required courses for the major. This course may not be used to fulfill the upper-level (60 or above) major requirement. A student must have a minimum grade point average of 3.30 in the major and 3.00 overall to enroll and must enroll before the end of the Fall term of their Senior year. Honors theses will be evaluated by a two-person Thesis Committee approved by the Undergraduate Committee. Thesis Committee members must be identified prior to the student signing up for Psychology 89. The Thesis Committee must include a regular member of the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences faculty. The other individual, if not a regular member of PBS, must have an active academic appointment (e.g., Research Associate, Research Assistant Professor, Medical School Faculty, Faculty in other departments of the College, for instance). Either Committee member may serve as the primary advisor. The two members of the Thesis Committee may not be in the same laboratory. The Thesis Committee will read and evaluate the thesis and make recommendations to the Undergraduate Committee regarding the awarding of Honors or High Honors. In addition, all Honors students will present their work in a departmental symposium at the conclusion of the Spring term. The Thesis Committee will also recommend in writing meritorious students to the Undergraduate Committee for consideration for the various departmental prizes. Two terms of this course are required of those who seek to graduate with Honors in Psychological and Brain Sciences.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6, 10 and 11. A sixty level course is strongly recommended. Students should check well in advance with their faculty advisor for additional prerequisites. Written permission from the advisor, and then written permission from the Chair of the Undergraduate Committee. The staff.

90. Independent Neuroscience Research

All terms: Arrange

This course is designed to enable students to engage in independent laboratory research under the direction of a neuroscience faculty member. Students may take up to two terms of independent research. Students are required to write a final report of their research.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 3, 6, 10 and 11. Written permission from the advisor, and then written permission from the Chair of the Neuroscience Oversight Committee. The staff.

91. Honors Neuroscience Research

All terms: Arrange

This course is designed to enable especially qualified students, usually seniors, to engage in independent laboratory research under the direction of a neuroscience faculty member. Students must take at least two terms of Psychology 91. A student must have a minimum grade point average of 3.30 in the major and 3.00 overall to enroll and must enroll by the Fall term of the senior year. The honors thesis will be evaluated by a two-person thesis committee approved by the Neuroscience Committee. Thesis committee members must be identified prior to the student signing up for Psychology 91. The thesis committee must include a regular faculty member of the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. The other individual must have an active academic appointment at Dartmouth. A prospectus of proposed research is due by the end of the fall term for approval by the Neuroscience Committee. The student is expected to submit a written thesis, give a public lecture and pass an oral examination administered by the thesis committee.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 6, 10 and 11. A 60 level course is strongly recommended. Students should check well in advance with their faculty advisor for additional prerequisites. Written permission from the advisor, and then written permission from the Chair of the Neuroscience Oversight Committee. The staff.

GRADUATE COURSES

100. Measurement and Statistics I

06F: Arrange. Wolford.

101. Measurement and Statistics II

07W: Arrange. Wolford.

111. Seminar in Special Topics

05F, 06W, 06S: Arrange

05F: Lorig: Scents and Nonsense: The Science of Smell.

05F: Kelley: Topic to be announced.

06W: Taube: Topic to be announced.

06W: Wolford: Topic to be announced.

06S: Glickstein. Topic to be announced.

112. Proseminar

05F: Arrange. The staff.

113. Proseminar

06W: Arrange. The staff.

114. Proseminar

05S: Arrange. The staff.

120. Tutorial Reading

All terms: Arrange. The staff.

187. Supervised Undergraduate Teaching.

All terms: Arrange. The staff.

188. Supervised Research. (one course credit)

All terms: Arrange. The staff.

Normally taken by first-year students.

189. Independent Research. (two course credits)

All terms: Arrange. The staff.

Normally taken by second-/third-year students who are completing the Specialist and beginning to develop a thesis proposal.

190. Predissertation Research. (three course credits)

All terms: Arrange. The staff.

Normally taken by third-/fourth-year students who have completed the Specialist but not yet proposed the dissertation.

191. Dissertation Research. (three course credits)

All terms: Arrange. The staff.

Taken by fourth-year students who have proposed the dissertation.