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Engineering Sciences

Chair: Eric W. Hansen

Professors I. Baker, B. Cushman-Roisin, G. Cybenko, E. Garmire, R. J. Graves, J. J. Helble, F. E. Kennedy, W. Lotko, D. R. Lynch, L. R. Lynd, K. D. Paulsen, H. J. Richter, E. M. Schulson, S. Taylor, C. E. Wyman; Professors Emeriti A. O. Converse, C. E. Hutchinson, E. Santos Jr., B. U. O. Sonnerup, G. B. Wallis; Associate Professors H. J. Frost, T. U. Gerngross, U. J. Gibson, E. W. Hansen, U. L. Osterberg, M. Q. Phan, B. W. Pogue, L. R. Ray, C. R. Sullivan, B. S. Trembly; Assistant Professor R. Olfati-Saber; Senior Lecturers M. Akay, J. P. Collier, E. S. Cooley, J. A. Daubenspeck, C. G. Levey, V. F. Petrenko, J. M. Rosen; Lecturers A. Bakker, V. H. Berk, D. C. Cullen, H. Deghani, M. M. Doyley, C. J. High, D. A. L. Hogsett, Q. R. Jett, M. S. Laser, R.C. Lasky, S. P. McGrath, S. P. Marra, D. L. Murr, P. J. Robbie, S. G. Shepherd.

The undergraduate Engineering Sciences major leads to an A.B. degree. It provides engineering students with a common core of Science and Engineering Sciences courses. Interest in the various branches of engineering is accommodated through electives and usually through additional study leading to a Bachelor of Engineering or higher degree. For those students considering careers in such diverse fields as medicine, management, or law, the Engineering Sciences major enables them to understand our increasingly technological society better.

Students interested in a career in Engineering should plan on completing the Bachelor of Engineering or Master’s program. The Bachelor of Engineering degree program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (EAC/ABET); it is equivalent in technical content to the Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering offered at many other universities but is broader in scope. It requires 10 courses in Natural Science, Mathematics, and Engineering beyond the requirements of the major in Engineering Sciences, and typically requires up to three terms in residence beyond the 12 terms required for the A.B. degree. Students who enter Dartmouth with advanced standing may be able to complete the B.E. at the same time as the A.B. in four years.

The graduate degrees are differentiated according to function. For those interested in design, professional practice, and engineering management, the M.E.M. degree is offered; for those interested primarily in research, the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees. Additionally a joint M.D./Ph.D. program is offered in conjunction with the Dartmouth Medical School and a joint M.E.M./M.B.A. program with the Tuck School of Business. The bulletin of the Thayer School of Engineering should be consulted for detailed information on all graduate programs (B.E. and above).

COURSES AVAILABLE TO NON-MAJORS AND FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS

Several engineering sciences courses have few or no prerequisites and may be taken by first-year students exploring a potential interest in the major, or by non-majors seeking to broaden their education with the study of technology. These courses include Engineering Sciences 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 21, 31, 37, and 51.

TECHNOLOGY

Undergraduate courses up to Engineering Sciences 86 satisfy the Technology and Applied Sciences distributive requirements (TAS). Some also satisfy the distributive laboratory requirement (TLA). For those students interested in an introduction to technology and applied sciences one of the courses Engineering Sciences 1 through 13 is recommended.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR

The sequential nature of the Engineering Sciences curriculum, and the possibilities for developing modified majors with other departments require that students plan their study programs well in advance. Assistance in planning programs may be obtained from an engineering faculty advisor.

All first-year students interested in the sciences should take the placement test in mathematics. The prerequisite courses for the Engineering Sciences major are either the Integrated Mathematics and Physics sequence (IMPS, see below) or Mathematics 3, 8, 13, Physics 13, 14, plus Engineering Sciences 20 and Chemistry 5. Computer Science 5 can be substituted for Engineering Sciences 20. For students prepared for advanced placement in Calculus it is advisable to take the sequence, Mathematics 8 and 13, or Mathematics 11.

The IMPS program, for students with a background in calculus (Mathematics 3 or equivalent placement), is a two-term (four-course equivalent) introductory Mathematics/Physics course sequence that provides a unified treatment of topics in calculus (including multivariable calculus and differential equations) coordinated with introductory Physics. The sequence, designed by members of the Mathematics, Physics, and Engineering departments consists of Mathematics 15.1 and 15.2 taken concurrently with Physics 13 and 14. It is intended for students who will pursue advanced courses in physical science, engineering and/or applied mathematics. See the Mathematics section for more information on this course.

Unless otherwise prohibited, prerequisites for the major may be taken under the Non-Recording Option. No more than two transfer courses may be used for credit in the major.

The Engineering Sciences Major requires seven courses from the core program:

1. Engineering Sciences 21, 22, and 23 are required.

Two from Engineering Sciences 24, 25, 26, and 27.

3. Two from Engineering Sciences 31 or 32; 33 or 34; 35 or 36; or 37.

Two additional courses are required.

4. One elective in Engineering Science.

5. One elective in Engineering Science, mathematics or a science course.

A Culminating Experience in Engineering Sciences is required. This can be taken instead of one of the electives or as an additional course. The culminating experience may be: a project or a thesis, Engineering Sciences 86, 88 or 190 (Engineering Sciences 190 must be taken as part of the two-course design sequence Engineering Sciences 190/290); or as an advanced course (Engineering Sciences 63, 76, 91, 92 or any graduate course available for A.B. credit).

Only Engineering Sciences courses numbered above 20 (excluding 80 and 87) may be counted as electives in the major.

Students seeking to complete the A.B. and B.E. degrees concurrently should note that Engineering Sciences 190 may also be counted toward requirements for the B.E. program.

Satisfactory completion of the major requires a grade point average of 2.0 in the courses suitable for satisfying the major (other than those prerequisite to the major). The same criterion holds for both courses in a modified major and those in a minor.

The courses in the third tier of the core Engineering Sciences (31-37) serve as introductions to different areas of engineering. These courses and other electives are offered to allow students to shape their programs to reflect interests in one of the usual branches of engineering or in accordance with their own special interests. In Mechanical Engineering, the normal third tier core courses and electives are Engineering Sciences 33, 34 and 76; in Electrical Engineering, Engineering Sciences 31, 32, 61 and 62; in Computer Engineering, Engineering Sciences 31, 62, 63 (see also modified major below); in Environmental Engineering, Engineering Sciences 37, 41, 42 and 43 (see also modified major below); in Materials Science, Engineering Sciences 33 and 73; in Chemical Engineering, Engineering Sciences 34, 35, 36 and 37 (see also modified major below); in Biomedical Engineering, Engineering Sciences 35 and 56. Students interested in Chemical Engineering are advised to elect Chemistry 6, 57, and 61 in addition to their engineering courses, and to consult Professor Lynd in formulating their program.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR IN ENGINEERING SCIENCES OR A MAJOR MODIFIED WITH ENGINEERING SCIENCES

Prerequisites are Mathematics 3 and 8, and Physics 13 or Physics 3 and 4. The required courses are four Engineering Sciences courses numbered above 20 (excluding 87), to include Engineering Science 21 or 22, or both. Students should note that many Engineering Sciences courses require prerequisites in addition to Mathematics 8 and Physics 13. No course in the modified major or the minor may be taken under the Non-Recording Option.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR IN MATERIALS SCIENCE

The minor in Materials Science is sponsored by faculty in Chemistry, Physics and Engineering with an interest in interdisciplinary education and research in materials science.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ENGINEERING PHYSICS MAJOR

The Department of Engineering Sciences and the Department of Physics and Astronomy offer a major in Engineering Physics. This major features a 5/5 split in courses, unlike a modified major which requires six courses from one field and four from the other.

The prerequisite courses for the Engineering Physics major are Mathematics 3, 8, 13, 23; Physics 13, 14; Chemistry 5; and Computer Science 5 or Engineering Sciences 20;

The Engineering Physics major is a ten-course program consisting of three Engineering Sciences core courses (Engineering Sciences 22, 23, 24); three Physics core courses (Physics 19, 24, 43 [Students with an average grade of B+ or higher in Physics 19 and prerequisite introductory courses may substitute a third elective for Physics 24]); and four electives, two from each department. Two electives must be selected from the following list: Engineering Sciences 25, 33, 34; Physics 42, 68, 71; Physics 73 or Engineering Sciences 131; Physics 66 or Engineering Sciences 120; Physics 44 or Engineering Sciences 140. The other two electives may be courses from the Engineering Sciences Department (numbered above 20, excluding Engineering Sciences 80 and 87) or courses from the Physics and Astronomy Department which fulfill the straight physics major.

A culminating experience is required in the major which can be taken instead of one of the electives above. It must be one of the following: a project or a thesis, Engineering Sciences 86, 88 or 190 (Engineering Sciences 190 must be taken as part of the two-course design sequence Engineering Sciences 190/290); or as an advanced course (Engineering Sciences 63, 76, 91, 92 or any graduate course available for A.B. credit), or Physics 68, 72, 73, 74, 76, 82, 87, including the senior honors thesis option.

All major programs require an average GPA of 2.0 in all courses counted toward the major, including prerequisites.

For more information contact Professor Hudson (Physics and Astronomy) or Professors Lotko or Levey (Engineering Sciences).

MODIFIED MAJORS

Diverse interests of students have, in the past, led to the construction of Engineering Sciences majors modified by courses in biology, chemistry, mathematics, computer sciences, physics, art, economics, or environmental studies.

The following specific modified majors have been established.

Modified major with Biology: Students interested in engineering and biology may elect a modified major with biology. This modified major must include:

1. as prerequisites: Mathematics 3, 8, and 13; Physics 13 and 14; Chemistry 5 or 10, Engineering Sciences 20, Biology 15 (Note: the IMPS Option, the Integrated Mathematics and Physical Science program may be substituted for the prerequisite Mathematics and Physics courses);

2. for the Engineering Sciences portion: Engineering Sciences 22, 25 and 35 plus three courses elected from Engineering Sciences 21, 23, 24, 26, 33, 34, 36, 37, 52, 56, 91, 161, 165 (Engineering Sciences 91, 161 and 165 also satisfy the culminating experiment requirement, see below);

3. for the biology portion: Biology 16, plus three courses elected from Biology 23, 27, 34, 35, 37, 61, 64, 65, 66, 71 or Chemistry 51 or 57.

4. the modified major must also include a culminating experience; which may be a project or a thesis, Engineering Sciences 86, 88 or 190 (Engineering Sciences 190 must be taken as part of the two-course design sequence Engineering Sciences 190/290); or as an advanced course (Engineering Sciences 63, 76, 91, 92 or any graduate course available for A.B. credit).

Students interested in the modified major with Biology should contact Professor Lynd.

Modified major with Chemistry: Students interested in engineering and chemistry may elect a modified major with chemistry. The major enables students to design programs of study that reflect the diversity of their interests. It requires a core of three engineering courses, provides a broad yet relevant set of engineering electives, requires a two-course chemistry core, and is completed with two chemistry electives. This modified major must include:

1. as prerequisites: Mathematics 3, 8, and 13; Physics 13 and 14; Chemistry 5/6 or 10; Engineering Sciences 20. (Note: IMPS Option, the Integrated Mathematics and Physical Sciences program may be substituted for the prerequisite Mathematics and Physics courses);

2. for the Engineering Sciences portion: Engineering Sciences 22, 25 and 36 plus three courses elected from the following: Engineering Sciences 21, 23, 24, 26, 33, 34, 35, 37, 52, 91, 156, 158 (Engineering Sciences 91, 156 and 158 also satisfy the culminating experience requirement, see below.) Not more than two from 21, 35 and 37 may be counted toward the major.

3. for the Chemistry portion: Chemistry 51 or 57 and 61 or 71 plus two courses elected from Chemistry 41, 52 or 58, 59, 63, 64, 67, 72, 73

4. the modified major must also include a culminating experience; which may be a project or a thesis, Engineering Sciences 86, 88 or 190 (Engineering Sciences 190 must be taken as part of the two-course design sequence Engineering Sciences 190/290); or as an advanced course (Engineering Sciences 63, 76, 91, 92 or any graduate course available for A.B. credit).

Students interested in the modified major with Chemistry should contact Professor Lynd.

Modified Major with Computer Science: For those students interested in computer engineering, a major in engineering sciences modified with computer science is recommended. Such a modified major must include:

1. as prerequisites: Mathematics 3, 8, and 13; Computer Science 5; Computer Science 15 or 18; Physics 13 and 14; and Chemistry 5 (Note: the IMPS Option, the Integrated Mathematics and Physical Science program may be substituted for the prerequisite Mathematics and Physics courses).

2. for the modified major required courses include: Engineering Sciences 22, 27 31, Computer Science 23, plus Engineering Sciences 23 or 24.

3. for the modified major, breadth options include: a total of five courses from Groups A, B, and C with at least one course from each of the groups and three of the courses must be Computer Science courses; Group A includes Engineering Sciences 32, 62, 63, Computer Science 37; Group B includes Engineering Sciences 26, 68, 92 (Engineering Sciences 63 and 92 also satisfy the culminating experience requirement, see below), Computer Science 78; Group C includes Engineering Sciences 91, Computer Science 25, 43, 58.

4. the modified major must also include a culminating experience; which may be a project or a thesis, Engineering Sciences 86, 88 or 190 (Engineering Sciences 190 must be taken as part of the two-course design sequence Engineering Sciences 190/290); or as an advanced course (Engineering Sciences 63, 76, 91, 92 or any graduate course available for A.B. credit).

Students interested in the modified major with Computer Science should contact Professor Cybenko.

Modified Major with Environmental Sciences: A modified major has been established to permit interdisciplinary study in environmental sciences. Effective preparation for graduate study or professional activity in the environmental sciences requires an assimilation of material traditionally encountered in biology, chemistry, ecology, and earth sciences, as well as in engineering sciences. This modified major must include:

1. as prerequisites: Mathematics 3, 8, and 13; Physics 13 and 14; Chemistry 5 or 10; Biological Sciences 14; and Engineering Sciences 20 (Note: the IMPS Option, the Integrated Mathematics and Physical Science program may be substituted for the prerequisite Mathematics and Physics courses);

2. for the Engineering Sciences portion: Engineering Sciences 22, 25, 37, 41, 43 and one of the following: Engineering Sciences 27, 34, 36, 52 or 171.

3. for the Environmental Sciences portion: four courses from the following list, with at least two courses from one department. Biological Sciences 25, 51, 53, 54; Chemistry 51, 63; Earth Sciences 26, 55, 66, 76; Environmental Studies 20, 25, 55, 79, 89. Additional requirements: Chemistry 51 is permitted only as a prerequisite to Chemistry 63.

4. the modified major must also include a culminating experience; which may be a project or a thesis, Engineering Sciences 86, 88 or 190 (Engineering Sciences 190 must be taken as part of the two-course design sequence Engineering Sciences 190/290); or as an advanced course (Engineering Sciences 63, 76, 91, 92 or any graduate course available for A.B. credit).

Students interested in the modified major with Environmental Sciences should contact Professor Lynch.

Modified major with Economics: Students interested in business and industrial management may elect a modified major with economics, consisting of:

1. as prerequisites: Mathematics 3, 8, and 13; Physics 13 and 14; Chemistry 5; Engineering Sciences 20 or Computer Science 5; Economics 1 and 10 (Note: the IMPS Option, the Integrated Mathematics and Physical Science program may be substituted for the prerequisite Mathematics and Physics courses);

2. for the Engineering Sciences portion: Engineering Sciences 21, 22, 52 and one course selected from Engineering Sciences 23, 24, 25, or 33; and two Engineering Science electives;

3. for the Economics portion: two courses among Economics 20, 21, 22, and a two-course sequence in Money and Finance (Economics 26 and 36), Industrial Organization (Economics 25 and 45), or International Trade (Economics 29 and 39).

4. the modified major must also include a culminating experience; which may be a project or a thesis, Engineering Sciences 86, 88 or 190 (Engineering Sciences 190 must be taken as part of the two-course design sequence Engineering Sciences 190/290); or as an advanced course (Engineering Sciences 63, 76, 91, 92 or any graduate course available for A.B. credit).

Students interested in the modified major with Economics should contact Professor Hansen.

Modified major with Studio Art: Students interested in architecture or product design may want to consider an engineering major modified with studio art. This modified major must include:

1. as prerequisites: Mathematics 3, 8, and 13; Physics 13 and 14; plus Engineering Sciences 20 and Chemistry 5. (Note: the IMPS Option, the Integrated Mathematics and Physical Science program may be substituted for the prerequisite Mathematics and Physics courses);

2. for the engineering science portion: Engineering Sciences 21, 24 and 33, plus two courses elected from Engineering Sciences 22, 25, 31, 37, 76 and one engineering science elective (Engineering Sciences 76 or a graduate level elective also satisfy the culminating experience requirement, see below);

3. for the studio art portion: Studio Art 15 and 16, plus two upper level studio art courses.

4. the modified major must also include a culminating experience; which may be a project or a thesis, Engineering Sciences 86, 88 or 190 (Engineering Sciences 190 must be taken as part of the two-course design sequence Engineering Sciences 190/290); or as an advanced course (Engineering Sciences 63, 76, 91, 92 or any graduate course available for A.B. credit).

Students interested in the modified major with Studio Art should contact Professor Kennedy.

Normally, other modified major programs will contain at least three of the following Engineering Sciences core courses: 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36 or 37 (plus two Engineering Sciences electives.) The modified major must also include a culminating experience; this can be taken instead of one of the electives or as an additional course. The culminating experience may be: a project or a thesis, Engineering Sciences 86, 88 or 190 (Engineering Sciences 190 must be taken as part of the two-course design sequence Engineering Sciences 190/ 290); or as an advanced course (Engineering Sciences 63, 76, 91, 92 or any graduate course available for A.B. credit). A coherent program of study with a substantial engineering content but not including all or any of the above courses may be approved (by the Department Chair) as a modified major based in another department, or as a special major.

All modified Engineering Sciences majors must be approved by the Chair of the Engineering Sciences Department.

HONORS PROGRAM

During their junior or senior year, students may apply for admission to the Honors Program in Engineering Sciences. The application must be filed no earlier than the second week of the fall term in the junior year and no later than the second week of the winter term in the senior year. Contact the Chair of the Engineering Sciences Department for details. Admission to the Honors Program may be granted to those students who have attained an overall grade point average of 3.0, and a grade point average of 3.33 in the major.

The main requirement of the Honors Program is the completion of an honors project. The project, a creative activity suitable to the major subject, is not restricted to experimental work but can equally take the form of a theoretical investigation. Much of the development of the honors project will normally take place within the framework of Engineering Sciences 88, the Honors Thesis. (Engineering Sciences 88 also fulfills the requirement for a culminating experience in the major.) Upon completion of the project, the student will submit a written thesis and give an oral presentation. Those students who satisfactorily complete the Honors Program with a ‘B+’ average or better and have a grade point average of 3.3 or higher in the major at the time of graduation, will earn Honors recognition in the major. High Honors will be granted to those students who, in addition, have taken two engineering science courses beyond those required for the major (excluding courses under 20), have attained a grade point average of 3.50 in all engineering courses, and have completed outstanding independent work. A vote of the Department is also required prior to awarding High Honors. Students may begin their project the previous term by enrolling in Engineering Science 87, Undergraduate Investigations. An interim evaluation of honors students will be made after one term and continuation will be recommended for those students whose work demonstrates the capacity for satisfactory (B+) work. Students who satisfactorily complete the Honors Program will have entered on their permanent record Honors in Engineering Sciences, or High Honors in Engineering Sciences.

ADVANCED STANDING IN THAYER SCHOOL GRADUATE PROGRAMS

Many students majoring in engineering sciences enter Dartmouth College with course credits, proficiencies, or both, in a number of subjects resulting from exceptional preparation in high school. As a result, these students have increased elective freedom in choosing courses to satisfy their A.B. requirements.

The 100- and 200-level Engineering and Engineering Sciences courses described in this bulletin can be used to satisfy the A.B. degree requirements.

Election of 100- and 200-level Engineering and Engineering Sciences courses in excess of the undergraduate requirements for the major and for admission to any of Thayer’s post-A.B. programs will permit a student to be admitted to the Thayer School with advanced standing. Depending upon the number of elective opportunities, significant reduction in the time required to complete Thayer School’s graduate degree programs is possible.

To take full advantage of this opportunity students are urged, as early as possible after declaring their major, to consult with their Thayer School faculty adviser. Additional details are contained in the Thayer School Bulletin

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER’S DEGREE (M.S.)

The Faculty of the Thayer School believes that the education of all graduate students should include reasonable breadth in the areas of applied mathematics and engineering.

In addition to the basic requirements for the Master’s degree, which include three terms in residence at Dartmouth, the Department requires:

For the M.S. with concentration in Engineering Sciences:

1. The requirement is nine approved graduate-level courses, five of which must be engineering courses. For students whose prior preparation is an accredited B.S. or B.E. in Engineering, or equivalent, the requirement is six graduate-level courses.

2. Satisfaction of the following distribution requirements:

a. One Applied Mathematics Core Course (see below)

b. Two Engineering Sciences Core Courses (see below)

(Courses taken previously, e.g., as an undergraduate, can be used in satisfaction of this requirement but do not reduce the number of courses required, unless admission is with advanced standing.)

3. A thesis approved by the student’s graduate committee and the faculty demonstrating the ability to do research and contribute to the field.

4. An oral defense of the thesis.

Applied Mathematics Core Courses:

ENGS 100, ENGS 103, ENGS 104, ENGS 105, ENGS 106, ENGS 200, ENGS 202, and ENGS 205.

Engineering Core Courses:

ENGS 110, ENGS 112, ENGS 116, ENGS 120, ENGS 130, ENGS 131, ENGS 132, ENGS 140, ENGS 150, ENGS 155, ENGS 156, ENGS 158, 161, 162, and ENGS 190/290.

A faculty advisor will be appointed for each candidate to aid in developing his or her program. The individual course of study must be submitted to, and be approved by, the Thayer School Graduate Committee, during the student’s first term of residency. The thesis must be approved by a thesis committee. The thesis committee generally consists of three faculty members from the student’s department/program of study (including the thesis advisor). One of the three may be from outside the department/program, but this is not a requirement. Copyright to theses will be held by the Trustees of Dartmouth College.

For students recommended for the award of the M.S. degree, the faculty may also recommend the award of the B.E. degree if a substantial portion of the student’s undergraduate program was taken at Dartmouth or in one of its official exchange programs and, if in meeting M.S. requirements, the ABET criteria for the award of the B.E. are also satisfied. Students wishing to take advantage of this opportunity should plan their M.S. programs appropriately, and should submit a petition to the faculty, endorsed by their thesis advisor, prior to completing the M.S. degree requirements. The petition must be received no later than one month prior to the scheduling of the M.S. thesis defense. Petition forms are available from the Registrar of the Thayer School.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DOCTOR’S DEGREE (PH.D.)

Students with a master’s degree (or outstanding performance on a bachelor’s degree) in engineering or the physical sciences are eligible for admission to the Doctor of Philosophy program. Consult the 2005-2006 Thayer School Bulletin for details. The requirements for the Ph.D. are as follows:

1. Residence at Thayer School for a minimum of eight terms after the bachelor’s degree, at least three of which occur after successful completion of the Oral Examination. Residence requires

a. six terms of participation in the weekly Thayer Seminar on Applied Science and Technology, including one-time completion of the special graduate Seminar on Science, Technology and Society, ENGS 195, and

b. annual participation in the Research-in-Progress Workshop, for which each Candidate in residence presents his or her individual research progress.

2. Technical proficiency in principles and methods of engineering, applied science, and applied mathematics underlying the anticipated thesis research, as evidenced by performance on an oral qualifying examination. The examination covers at least three fundamental areas selected by the Candidate in consultation with his or her special advisory committee and approved by the Director.*

3. Technical breadth in engineering or applied science, as demonstrated by either an approved course of study in one or more areas outside or secondary to the Candidate’s main area of specialization, defense of a research proposal or completion of a project in an area outside the Candidate’s main area of specialization.*

4. Specialization with mastery at an advanced level of the body of knowledge pertaining to the Candidate’s chosen area of research, as demonstrated by the successful oral defense of a thesis proposal, and by completion of a program of study approved by the Graduate Program Committee. The extent and content of this program are designed to meet the individual interests and needs of the Candidate.*

5. Professional competence in resource development for a research project or technology startup enterprise, as demonstrated by completion of a competitive research proposal or business plan for a technology startup company. The proposal or business plan may be developed either independently or as part of the Competitive Proposal Workshop.*

6. Original research making a significant contribution to knowledge, combined with demonstration of professional expertise in the chosen area of study, as demonstrated by at least the following:

a. presentation of elements of the doctoral research at a professional meeting with the Candidate as first author,

b. a dissertation of professional quality certified by the Candidate’s thesis committee,

c. acceptance of at least one manuscript on the doctoral research for publication with the Candidate as first author, and

d. public oral presentation and defense of the dissertation.

* The oral examination, procedures for demonstrating technical breadth, thesis proposal, and workshop to facilitate development of a competitive research proposal or business plan are described in more detail in the Thayer School Bulletin

M.D.-PH.D. PROGRAM IN BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING

Thayer School of Engineering and the Dartmouth Medical School offer an M.D./Ph.D. program in biomedical engineering. Students must apply to the Medical School, indicating their interest in the joint program. The requirements for the Ph.D. portion of the program are modified to permit a more efficient completion of the dual degree program.

A student may begin by first pursuing two years of study in basic science at the Medical School. Enrollment in Thayer School for two years follows, during which the student would take courses, qualify for Ph.D. candidacy, pass the oral examination, and initiate dissertation research. Alternately, some students prefer to satisfy basic Ph.D. requirements before starting medical school. The research would then be continued in concert with years 3 and 4 of the M.D. program (the clinical years), especially during year 4 where dissertation research would be counted as elective courses toward the M.D. Both degrees are awarded simultaneously after typically 6 to 6 1/2 years of study.

Specific requirements of this program are:

M.D. component: Completion of the 4-year M.D. curriculum. Elective time of year 4 can be devoted to Ph.D. dissertation research. (Consult the Dartmouth Medical School Bulletin for details.)

Ph.D. component:

1. Residence at Thayer School for a minimum of five terms after the Bachelor’s degree, at least one of which occur after successful completion of the Oral Examination. Residence requires three terms of participation in the weekly Thayer Seminar on Applied Science and Technology.

2. Technical proficiency in principles and methods of engineering, applied science, and applied mathematics underlying the anticipated thesis research, as evidenced by performance on an oral qualifying examination. The examination covers at least three fundamental areas selected by the Candidate in consultation with his or her special advisory committee and approved by the graduate program committee.*

3. Technical breadth in engineering or applied science, as demonstrated by either an approved course of study in one or more areas outside or secondary to the Candidate’s main area of specialization or defense of a research proposal or completion of a project in an area outside the Candidate’s main area of specialization.*

4. Specialization with mastery at an advanced level of the body of knowledge pertaining to the Candidate’s chosen area of research, as demonstrated by the successful oral defense of a thesis proposal, and by completion of a program of study approved by the M.D./Ph.D. Biomedical Engineering Committee. The extent and content of this program are designed to meet the individual interests and needs of the Candidate.*

5. Original research making a significant contribution to knowledge, combined with demonstration of professional expertise in the chosen area of study, as demonstrated by at least the following:

a. presentation of elements of the doctoral research at a professional meeting with the Candidate as first author,

b. a dissertation of professional quality certified by the Candidate’s thesis committee. The Thesis Committee consists of a minimum of three full-time faculty members from the student’s department/program of study (including the thesis advisor) and one with an appointment outside the department/program, preferably outside of Dartmouth.

c. acceptance of at least one manuscript on the doctoral research for publication with the Candidate as first author, and

d. public oral presentation and defense of the dissertation.

*The oral examination, procedures for demonstrating technical breadth, and thesis proposal are discussed in more detail in the Thayer School Bulletin.

PH.D. IN COMPUTER SCIENCE

A Ph.D. in computer science is offered by the graduate program in Computer Science, including some Thayer School faculty. See the section entitled Computer Science  for details.

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

1. Everyday Technology

06W, 07W: 12; Laboratory

This course is intended to take the mystery out of the technology that we have grown to depend on in our everyday lives. Both the principles behind and examples of devices utilizing electricity, solid and fluid properties, chemical effects, mechanical attributes and other topics will be discussed. In the associated lab project, students will dissect, analyze, (and possibly revive!) a broken gadget or appliance of their choosing.

This course has no prerequisite, but enrollment is limited to 30 students. Dist: TLA. Gibson.

2. The Technology of Sailing

05F: 9; Laboratory

While the art of building sailing vessels has been developed over thousands of years, only since the turn of the century has the design of sailboats undergone a major revolution, because of a better knowledge of fluid mechanics and the development of such new strong lightweight materials as fiberglass and Kevlar. The fundamentals of fluid mechanics will be studied in order to understand why and how a sailboat moves. Design criteria will be developed, and modern designs, materials, and sails used for today’s sailboats will be discussed. A design project will be assigned to each student. There will be a laboratory and the students will have the opportunity to sail with the College sailing team on Lake Mascoma.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 3 or permission. Enrollment is limited to 40 students. Dist: TLA. Richter.

3. Materials: The Substance of Civilization

06X: 2A

With the exception of ideas and emotions, materials are the substance of civilization. From the “Iceman’s�? copper ax to indium phosphide gallium arsenide semiconductor lasers, materials have always defined our world. We even name our epochs of time based on the dominant material of the age: Stone Age, Bronze Age, Iron Age and now Silicon Age. In addition to discussing the nature and processing of metals, polymers, ceramics, glass and electronic materials, this course will analyze the dramatic developments in civilization directly resulting from advances in such materials. The text Stephen Sass’s The Substance of Civilization will be used in the course.

No Prerequisite. Dist: TAS. Lasky.

4. Technology of Cyberspace

Not offered in the period from 05F through 07S

This course will cover some basic concepts underlying the ‘information superhighway.’ The technologies of high speed networking have stimulated much activity within the federal government, the telecommunications and computer industries, and even social science and popular fiction writing. The technical focus will be on communications technologies, information theory, and the communications requirements of video (standard and ATV), speech (and other audio), text data. Social economic and policy issues will be an integral part of the course. Dist: TAS. The staff.

5. Healthcare and Biotechnology in the 21st Century

06S, 07S: 2A

Technologies that will impact healthcare in the 21st century are explored, including biology, robotics, and information. Biotechnologies are explored that will be used for the treatment of diseases and the regeneration of missing organs and limbs. Robotics will be explored that will replace parts.

This will include artificial organs, robots as replacement for human parts, the human genome project, gene therapy, biomaterials, genetic engineering, cloning, transplantation (auto, allo and xeno), limb regeneration, man-machine interfaces, robotics, prosthetic limbs, artificial organs and joints. This section will also cover ethical issues related to the above topics and issues regarding the FDA and the approval of new medical treatments. We will discuss going beyond normal with respect to the senses, muscles and creating wings.

No Prerequisite. Dist: TAS. Rosen, Robbie.

7. First-Year

Seminars in Engineering Sciences

Consult special listings

8. Introduction to Technology

06X: 11

This course is designed to enable non-majors to gain some familiarity with our increasingly technological world. The nature and evolution of technology will be described, its impact and consequences, along with some applications that have been enabled. Students will gain first-hand experience with the principles of engineering design and development, as well as with assessing the impact and consequences of technology and its interdependence with other academic fields.

Enrollment is limited to 20 students. Dist: TAS. Garmire.

9. Nanotechnology

06S: 10A

This course will study the nanoscale world. The course will explore the basic tenets, as well as the emerging applications of nanoscience.

We will introduce the visionaries of the nanotechnological revolution, including specifically, Feynman, Drexler, and Smalley as well as the controversies surrounding some of these individuals. Science fiction and science fact blend as never before when nanotechnology is explored in literature. The class will read Neal Stephenson’s The Diamond Age, a novel in which nanotechnology is used to control human activity, and examine its implications on the moral duties of those involved in the discovery and application of natural phenomena.

No Prerequisite. Dist: TAS. Gibson.

10. Biomedical Informatics

06W, 07W: 3A

Biomedical informatics is an emerging discipline that coalesces the health science knowledges including medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, nursing, radiology and biological sciences with computer science, mathematics, statistics, engineering, information technologies and management. The objective of this course is to provide the theoretical foundations and the current applications of biomedical informatics in health sciences, and health care delivery systems. The course contents include structures, algorithms and design of algorithms necessary to organize, store, retrieve and analyze data and develop computational solutions to produce new knowledge and understanding about, and representation of biomedical knowledge, management of health care/hospital systems, clinical decision making, research in biomedical and pharmaceutical systems, and design and development of interactive and distributive multimedia systems for education.

Prerequisites: Math 3 and permission of instructor. Dist: TAS. Satisfies the Interdisciplinary requirement. Akay.

12. Introduction to Product Design

06W, 07W: 2A

A preliminary investigation of the problems and language of product design. This is a laboratory, project-based course emphasizing concept development, creative problem solving, and the synthesis of aesthetic, technical, and human factors in design. Design thinking and visual language skills developed and exercised in the context of solving design problems, executed in a variety of modes from sketches to prototypes.

Enrollment limited to 20. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Dist: TAS. Robbie.

13. Virtual Medicine and Cybercare

05F, 06F: 2A

There is a revolution in technology that is occurring in health care. This new technology will dramatically change how health care is delivered in the future.

This course will cover topics related to the virtual human created from bits. This will include virtual reality, augmented reality and datafusion, computer simulation, advanced 3D and 4D imaging techniques, the operating room of the future, minimally invasive surgery, space medicine, tele-operations, telemedicine and tele-surgery, internet 2 and cyberspace, artificial intelligence and intelligent agents applied to medicine, and the national library of medicine virtual human project.

We will also discuss the FDA approval of computer simulators, robotic surgeons, and the ethics of robots doing surgery. In addition we will discuss the medical library of the future, teleconferencing and the use of interactive media in healthcare education. We will also discuss computerized patient records (CPR) and clinical information systems.

No prerequisite. Dist. TAS. Rosen, Robbie.

15. Undergraduate Investigations in Engineering

All terms: Arrange

An original investigation in a phase of science or engineering under the supervision of a member of the staff. Students electing the course will be expected to have a proposal approved by the Department Chair and to meet weekly with the staff member supervising the investigation. The course is open to undergraduates who are not majoring in engineering. It may be elected only once, or taken as one course credit for each of three consecutive terms. A report describing the details of the investigation must be filed with the Department Chair at the completion of the course.

Prerequisite: Permission of Department Chair (a one-page proposal submission is required). Dist: TAS.

20. Introduction to Scientific Computing

06S, 07S: 12

This course introduces concepts and techniques for creating computational solutions to problems in engineering and science. The essentials of computer programming are developed using the C and Matlab languages, with the goal of enabling the student to use the computer effectively in subsequent courses. Programming topics include problem decomposition, control structures, recursion, arrays and other data structures, file I/O, graphics, and code libraries. Applications will be drawn from numerical solution of ordinary differential equations, root finding, matrix operations, searching and sorting, simulation, and data analysis. Good programming style and computational efficiency are emphasized. Although no previous programming experience is assumed, a significant time commitment is required.

Students planning to pursue the engineering sciences major are advised to take Engineering Sciences 20. Students considering the computer science major or majors modified with computer science should take Computer Science 5.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 3 and prior or concurrent enrollment in Mathematics 8. Shepherd.

21. Introduction to Engineering

05F: 10; Laboratory06S: 11; Laboratory

06F: 10; Laboratory07S: 11; Laboratory

The student is introduced to engineering through participation, as a member of a team, in a complete design project. The synthesis of many fields involving the laws of nature, mathematics, economics, management, and communication is required in the project. Engineering principles of analysis, experimentation, and design are applied to a real problem, from initial concept to final recommendations. The project results are evaluated in terms of technical and economic feasibility plus social significance. Lectures are directed toward the problem, and experiments are designed by students as the need develops.

Enrollment is limited to 64 students. Prerequisite: Mathematics 3 or permission of the instructor. Dist: TAS. Collier (fall), Lotko (spring).

22. Systems

06W: 9; Laboratory Tu,Th06X: 10; Laboratory

07W: 9; Laboratory Tu,Th07X: 10; Laboratory

The student is introduced to the techniques of modeling and analyzing lumped, linear systems. The course will be concerned primarily with an elementary treatment of electrical, mechanical, fluid, and thermal systems. System input will be related to output through ordinary differential equations, which will be solved by analytical and numerical techniques. System concepts, such as time constant, natural frequency, and damping factor, are introduced. The course includes computer and laboratory exercises to enhance the students’ understanding of the principles of lumped systems.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 13 Physics 14, and Engineering Sciences 20. Dist: TLA. Lynd (winter), Trembly (summer).

23. Distributed Systems and Fields

05F: 206S: 906F: 207S: 9

A study of the fundamental properties of distributed systems and their description in terms of scalar and vector fields. After a summary of vector-field theory, the formulation of conservation laws, source laws, and constitutive equations is discussed. Energy and force relations are developed and the nature of potential fields, wave fields, and diffusion fields examined. A survey of elementary transport processes is given. Particular attention is given to the relation between the description of systems in terms of discrete and distributed parameters. Applications are chosen primarily from fluid mechanics, electromagnetic theory, and heat transfer.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 22, or permission. Dist: TAS. Hansen (fall), Paulsen (spring).

24. Science of Materials

06W, 06S, 07W,

07S: 10; Laboratory

An introduction to the structure/property relationships that govern the mechanical, the thermal, and the electrical behavior of solids (ceramics, metals, and polymers). Topics include atomic, crystalline, and amorphous structures; x-ray diffraction; imperfections in crystals; phase diagrams; phase transformations; elastic and plastic deformation; free electron theory and band theory of solids; and electrical conduction in metals and semiconductors. The laboratory consists of an experimental project selected by the student and approved by the instructor.

Prerequisite: Physics 14 and Chemistry 5. Dist: TLA. Frost (winter), Schulson (spring).

25. Introduction to Thermodynamics

06S: 906X: 1107S: 207X: 11

The fundamental concepts and methods of thermodynamics are developed around the first and second laws. The distinctions among heat, work, and energy are emphasized. Common processes for generating work, heat, refrigeration, or changing the physical or chemical state of materials are analyzed. The use of thermodynamic data and auxiliary functions, such as entropy, enthalpy, and free energy, is integrated into the analysis. The numerous problems show how theoretical energy requirements and the limitations on feasible processes can be estimated.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 13, Physics 13, Computer Science 5 or Engineering Science 20. Dist: TAS. The staff (spring), Wyman (summer).

26. Control Theory

05F: 906S: 1106F: 9; Laboratory

The course treats the design of analog, lumped parameter systems for the regulation or control of a plant or process to meet specified criteria of stability, transient response, and frequency response. The basic theory of control system analysis and design is considered from a general point of view. Mathematical models for electrical, mechanical, chemical, and thermal systems are developed. Feedback control system design procedures are established using root-locus and frequency-response methods.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 22. Dist: TAS. Ray (fall), the staff (spring).

27. Discrete and Probabilistic Systems

06W, 07W: 2; Laboratory

This course is an introduction to probabilistic methods for modeling, analyzing, and designing systems. Mathematical topics include the fundamentals of probability, random variables and common probability distributions, basic queueing theory, and stochastic simulation. Applications, drawn from a variety of engineering settings, may include measurement and noise, information theory and coding, computer networks, diffusion, fatigue and failure, reliability, statistical mechanics, ecology, decision making, and robust design.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 8 and either Engineering Sciences 20 or Computer Science 5. Physics 13 or Chemistry 5 recommended. Dist: TAS. Cybenko.

31. Digital Electronics (Identical to Computer Science 27)

06S: 1206X: 907S: 1207X: 9; Laboratory

This course classical switching theory including Boolean algebra, logic minimization, algorithmic state machine abstractions, and synchronous system design. This theory is then applied to digital electronic design. Techniques of logic implementation, from Small Scale Integration (SSI) through Application-Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs), are encountered. There are weekly laboratory exercises for the first part of the course followed by a digital design project in which the student designs and builds a large system of his or her choice. In the process, Computer-Aided Design (CAD) and construction techniques for digital systems are learned. Dist: TLA. Pogue (spring), Hansen (summer).

32. Electronics: Introduction to Linear and Digital Circuits (Identical to Physics 48)

06W, 07W: 11; Laboratory

Principles of operation of semiconductor diodes, bipolar and field-effect transistors, and their application in rectifier, amplifier, waveshaping, and logic circuits. Basic active-circuit theory. DC biasing and small-signal models. Introduction to integrated circuits: the operational amplifier and comparator. Emphasis on breadth of coverage of low-frequency linear and digital networks. Laboratory exercises permit ‘hands-on’ experience in the analysis and design of simple electronic circuits. The course is designed for two populations: a) those desiring a single course in basic electronics, and b) those desiring the fundamentals necessary for further study of active circuits and systems.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 22, or equivalent background in basic circuit theory. Dist: TAS. Sullivan.

33. Solid Mechanics

05F: 1106X: 1206F: 1107X: 12; Laboratory

After a brief review of the concepts of rigid body statics, the field equations describing the static behavior of deformable elastic solids are developed. The concepts of stress and strain are introduced and utilized in the development. Exact and approximate solutions of the field equations are used in the study of common loading cases, including tension/compression, bending, torsion, pressure, and combinations of these.

In the laboratory phase of the course, various methods of experimental solid mechanics are introduced. Some of these methods are used in a project in which the deformation and stress in an actual load system are determined and compared with theoretical predictions. The course includes several computer exercises designed to enhance the student’s understanding of the principles of solid mechanics.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 13, Physics 13, and Engineering Sciences 20 or Computer Science 5. Dist: TAS. Phan (fall), Kennedy (summer).

34. Fluid Dynamics

06W, 07W: 9; Laboratory

A survey of fundamental concepts, phenomena, and methods in fluid mechanics and their application in engineering systems and in nature. Emphasis is placed on the development and use of the conservation laws for mass, momentum, and energy, as well as on the empirical knowledge essential to the understanding of many fluid-dynamic phenomena. Applications include fluid machinery as well as geophysical, environmental, and biomedical fluid flows.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 23 and 25 (may be taken concurrently), or permission of the instructor.

Dist: TLA. The staff.

35. Biotechnology and Biochemical Engineering

05F, 06F: 9; Laboratory

A consideration of the engineering and scientific basis for using cells or their components in engineered systems. Central topics addressed include kinetics and reactor design for enzyme and cellular systems; fundamentals, techniques, and applications of recombinant DNA technology; and bioseparations. Additional lectures will provide an introduction to metabolic modeling as well a special topics. The course is designed to be accessible to students with both engineering and life-science backgrounds.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 3, Chemistry 3 or 5, Biology 15 or permission. For this course to count for graduate credit, students must complete a project that will involve additional class meetings. Dist: TLA. Hogsett.

36. Chemical Process Engineering

05F, 06F: 10A

Process engineering focuses on the transformation of raw materials into desired products, maximizing efficiency while minimizing environmental impact. This course introduces students to the central concepts of chemical process engineering: material and energy balances, chemical kinetics, diffusion and mass transfer, and chemical thermodyamics. These concepts are then employed in the design and analysis of processes that include chemical and biochemical reactors, separation processes, and recycle operations. Examples will be drawn from chemical, biochemical, and environmental processes of industrial relevance.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 22 and Engineering Sciences 25 or its equivalent. Dist: TAS. Wyman.

37. Introduction to Environmental Engineering

05F, 06F: 10

A survey of the sources, measurement techniques, and treatment technologies relating to environmental pollution resulting from the activities of humans. The course will be technology-focused, but will also touch on topics related to the implementation of technology in the real world such as public perception, policy and legislation, and choosing between technological alternatives. Technological and other issues will be addressed relating to water pollution, air pollution, solid wastes, and the fate and transport of pollutants in the environment. Consideration of each area will include general background and key concepts, detailed design examples of importance in the area, and case studies/current topics. The course will include guest lectures.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 3 and Chemistry 5, or equivalent, or permission. Dist: TAS. Cushman-Roisin.

41. Environmental and Natural-Resource Management

06S, 07S: 11

Principles of scientific management of natural resources and the environment are explored. Concepts of sustainability are developed for water resources and water quality at the regional level. Population dynamics are explored for living resources in both natural and harvested regimes, including forests and fisheries. The intersection of natural, economic, and political behavior is explored in theory via computer simulation; case studies illustrate contemporary management problems and practices.

Prerequisite: Math 13. Dist: TAS. Lynch.

42. Contaminant Hydrogeology (Identical to Earth Sciences 76)

07S: ArrangeLaboratoryOffered alternate spring terms

Groundwater contamination is a widespread threat to the environment and to human health. This course will include a survey of physical, chemical, and biological processes by which both dissolved and multi-phase contaminants are transported and transformed in the subsurface. Laboratory is used to illustrate phenomena and principles.

Prerequisite: Earth Sciences 66 or permission of instructor. Dist: TAS. Renshaw.

43. Environmental Transport and Fate

06W, 07W: 11

Introduction to movement and transformation of substances released into the natural environment. Fundamentals of advection, dispersion, and reaction. Aggregation and parameterization of various mixing processes leading to dispersion at larger spatial and temporal scales. Importance of inhomogeneity, anisotropy, and stratification in natural media. Basic principles are illustrated by application to atmospheric, ground water, river, estuarine, coastal, and oceanic pollution problems. Case studies include urban smog, acid rain, Chernobyl fall-out, and stratospheric ozone depletion.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 13; Engineering Sciences 37 or permission. Dist: TAS. Cushman-Roisin.

44. Sustainable Design

06W, 07W: 3A

An interdisciplinary introduction to the principles of design for the environment (DfE). Through lectures, discussions, and design projects students will learn strategies for managing the complexity of the product life-cycle, including design for manufacturing, use, and disposal. Working in design teams, students will develop and present solutions to engineering design challenges drawn from architecture and product design. Enrollment is limited to 20 students

Prerequisites: Engineering Sciences 21 and 22 or Studio Art 65. Dist: TAS. Cushman-Roisin, Kawiaka, Robbie.

51. Principles of Systems Dynamics

05F, 06F: 10A

This course introduces systems dynamics, an approach to policy design and analysis based upon feedback principles and computer simulation. The approach is useful for gaining an understanding of the underlying structural causes of problem behavior in social, economic, political, environmental, technological, and biological systems. Goals of this approach are to gain better understanding of such problem behaviors and to design policies aimed at improving them. Lectures and exercises illustrate applications of the approach to real, current problems such as urban decay, resource depletion, environmental pollution, product marketing and distribution, and agricultural planning in an expanding population. The similarity and transferability of underlying feedback characteristics among various applications is emphasized. No prior engineering or computer science experience is necessary.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 3. Dist: TAS. Daubenspeck.

52. Introduction to Operations Research

06W, 07W: 10A

Basic concepts of optimization are introduced as aids in systematic decision-making in engineering contexts. Deterministic optimization is developed in the form of linear and integer programming and their extensions. Probabilistic models are introduced in terms of Markov chains, queuing and inventory theory, and stochastic simulation. The course emphasizes the application of these methods to the design, planning, and operation of complex industrial and public systems.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 8. Dist: TAS. Jett.

56. Introduction to Biomedical Engineering

06S, 07S: 2

This course will survey applications of engineering principles to medical diagnosis/treatment of disease, monitoring/measurement of physiological function, and rehabilitation/ replacement of body dysfunction. Case studies will be used to highlight how engineering has advanced medical practice and understanding. Examples will be drawn from bioinstrumentation, bioelectricity, biotransport, biomaterials, and biomechanics. While investigations will focus primarily on the engineering aspects of related topics, issues surrounding patient safety, public policy and regulation, animal experimentation, etc. will be discussed as appropriate.

Prerequisite: Physics 13 and 14 (Physics 14 may be taken concurrently). Dist: TLA. Paulsen.

61. Intermediate Electrical Circuits (Pending Faculty Approval)

05F, 06F: 11; Laboratory

A method for writing the equations for any practical circuit is defined. Fundamental theorems based on network topology and conservation laws are presented. Arbitrary networks are analyzed as combinations of two-port networks. The op-amp is studied as a powerful electronic building block. Filter theory is explored in depth, and filters are implemented as op-amp circuits. The bipolar junction transistor is treated as at two-port and applied to create the operational amplifier. The student is exposed to computer-aided design. Laboratory exercises provide an opportunity to apply theory.

This course is intended for those who wish to prepare for advanced study of electrical circuits.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 22. Dist: TLA. Trembly.

62. Microprocessors in Engineered Systems

06W, 07W: 2A

Microprocessors and microcomputers are central components in an ever-increasing number of consumer, industrial, and scientific products. This course extends the design framework developed in Engineering Sciences 31 to include these high integration parts. Students are introduced

to simple and advanced microcomputers, their supporting peripheral hardware, and the hardware and software tools that aid designers in creating embedded system controllers. Laboratory projects will cover basic microprocessor behavior, bus interfaces, peripheral devices, and digital signal processing.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 20 and 31. Dist: TAS. McGrath.

63. Introduction to VLSI Systems

05F, 06F: 12

This course provides an introduction to VLSI (Very Large Scale Integration) systems. It starts by examining basic CMOS logic circuits and VLSI design styles, and then surveys VLSI architectures and current trends in chip design. A group design project is required in which students specify the function of a large digital system, decompose it into primitive components, lay out its physical design, and verify and debug its digital behavior. Students learn to use modern CAD (Computer-Aided Design) tools, which are essential in managing the complexity that VLSI offers. Chips designed by students are fabricated by the MOSIS fabrication service during the winter term. Students then test and evaluate their designs. Grades will not be reported until this task is completed.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 31. Dist: TAS. Cooley.

65. Engineering Software Design

Not offered in the period from 05F through 07S

As a successor to Engineering Sciences 20, this course covers intermediate topics in programming and software design with an emphasis on engineering applications. Students will learn software design principles and basic data structures. Topics covered will include object-oriented design, user interface design, lists, stacks, queues, binary trees, hash tables, and simulation. Students will learn techniques for developing maintainable, extensible, and understandable software.

This course is not a substitute for Computer Science 15, so students planning to continue in computer science are advised to take Computer Science 15 instead of Engineering Sciences 65. This course is not open to students with credit for Computer Science 15, Computer Science 18, or Computer Science 19.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 20 or Computer Science 5, junior or higher standing. Dist: TAS.

66. Discrete Mathematics in Computer Science (Identical to Mathematics 19 and Computer Science 19)

05F: 11 06W: 1006F:1107W: 10

This course integrates discrete mathematics with algorithms and data structures, using computer science applications to motivate the mathematics. It is designed to be taken simultaneously with Computer Science 15, 18, or 19. However students who are unable to complete it in this way may take it after Computer Science 15, 18 or 19 but before Computer Science 25.

The course introduces counting techniques and number theory, with an emphasis on the application to RSA public key cryptography. It covers logic and proofs, including mathematical induction. Relationships among recursive algorithms, recurrence relations, and mathematical induction are discussed with particular attention to trees as a recursive data structure. Issues of expected running time for algorithms and the technique of “hashing�? data files for quick recovery of information guides the discussion of probability through independent trials experiments and expected values. The course also covers matrix algebra, motivated by how linear transformations are used in computer graphics and (time permitting) in error correction codes.

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Computer Science 15, 18 or 19 or completion of Computer Science 15, 18 or 19. Dist: QDS. The staff.

68. Introduction to Communication Systems

06W, 07W: 10A

This course provides an introduction to communication systems. The focus is on the deterministic aspects of analog and digital systems. The student is introduced to modeling and analyzing signals in the time and frequency domains. Modulation techniques are addressed as well as, sampling, multiplexing, line coding, pulse shaping. Recent developments in communication systems are briefly discussed.

Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in Engineering Sciences 22, 27 and 92 strongly recommended. Osterberg.

69. Engineering Secure Computing Systems

06W, 07W: 10A

This course will provide students with an introduction to computer networks and operating systems, and the ways that these systems can be maliciously exploited. Vulnerabilities will be discussed both generally and specifically, demonstrating that all computing platforms are vulnerable to attack, but that differences in operating system architectures lead to unique weaknesses. A survey of defensive measures and “best-practices�? for computer security will give students a broad knowledge of how systems can be secured.

Prerequisites: Engineering Sciences 20 or Computer Science 5. Dist: TAS. McGrath.

73. Materials Processing and Selection

06S, 07S: 10A; Laboratory

In this course the basic concepts of materials science introduced in Engineering Sciences 24 are applied to a variety of materials problems and processes. The course will treat processes and principles relevant to both mechanical and electrical engineering applications. Topics include solidification and crystal growth, joining and bonding techniques, deformation processing, surface coatings and thin film deposition, polymer processing, composite materials, magnetic and dielectric materials, powder metallurgy and ceramics processing, materials selection, failure processes, and quality control. The course will involve laboratory exercises and field trips to local industry. Materials applications will be considered on a case study basis, including aerospace and automotive structures, consumer goods, and high performance sports equipment, electric components, VLSI circuit fabrication and packaging.

Prerequisites: Engineering Sciences 24 and Engineering Sciences 33 or permission. Dist: TLA. Frost.

75. Advanced Product Design

06S, 07S: 11; Laboratory

A seminar on human-centered design for advanced students. Individual design projects will form the vehicle for exploring creative strategies for optimizing product design for human use. The goal is integration of multiple disciplines required for successful design, including human factors, aesthetics, engineering analysis, and design for manufacturing. Each project will involve practice in need-finding, creative concept development, iterative modeling, prototyping, analysis and testing. The course includes presentations by visiting professional designers. Enrollment is limited to 16 students. Engineering Sciences 75 may be counted as an elective in the major. It may be used for course count and design credit in the B. E. Program.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 21 (or 190) and 24, 33 or permission of the instructor. Robbie, Collier.

76. Machine Engineering

05F, 06F: 2

An introduction to the analysis and synthesis of mechanical components and systems. Analysis of the various components requires application of specialized solutions of the equations of elasticity along with laws governing the mechanical behavior of materials. Topics and components to be studied will include power transmission shafting, springs, screws, belts, clutches, brakes, roller chains, welded connections, lubrication, ball and roller bearings, and gears.

A major project must be completed that demonstrate the ability of the student to synthesize a workable and sufficiently optimized design of a machine or device.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 33. Dist: TAS. Kennedy.

80. Ethics and Engineering

06S: 2

An examination of the normative dimensions of professional practice, with a practical focus on Engineering. A discussion of Common Morality; ethical theories (virtue, deontological, utilitarian, contractarian); the definition and role of professions in contemporary societies, including theories of professionalism that seek to justify action or inaction in the workplace. The relations among professionals, clients, employers, professional societies, and the service population; professional codes of conduct. Case studies will include contemporary accidents and issues in advanced technology (genetic engineering; nanotechnology; the machine-human interface). Goals of achievement for the profession will be examined, as expressed by professional societies, educators, and legislation, in the context of emergent globalization of technology and trade.

Enrollment limited to 20 students. May not be used to satisfy A.B. major requirements. It may be used for course count in the B. E. Program.

Prerequisite: Senior standing in the Engineering Sciences major, the physical sciences, or Philosophy; or permission. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV. Lynch.

84. Reading Course

All Terms: Arrange

Advanced undergraduates occasionally arrange with a faculty member a reading course in a subject not occurring in the regularly scheduled curriculum. This course can only be elected once and either Engineering Sciences 84 or 85 may be used toward the Engineering Sciences major, but not both.

Prerequisite: Permission of the Department Chair.

85. Special Topics

All Terms: Arrange

From time to time a section of Engineering Sciences 85 may be offered in order to provide an advanced course in a topic which would not otherwise appear in the curriculum. This course can only be elected once and either Engineering Sciences 84 or 85 may be used toward the Engineering Sciences major, but not both.

Prerequisite: Permission of the Department Chair.

86. Independent Project

All terms: Arrange

An individual research or design project carried out under the supervision of a member of the staff. Students electing this course will be expected to carry out preliminary reading during the preceding term. This course may be taken in one term, or as a one-third course credit for each of three consecutive terms. A major written report and oral presentation will be submitted at the completion of the course.

Engineering Sciences 86 may be counted as an elective in the major if Engineering Sciences 190 is taken as the culminating experience.

Prerequisite: Senior standing in the engineering sciences major and permission of the Department Chair. (One-page proposal submission required.)

87. Undergraduate Investigations

All terms: Arrange

An original investigation in a phase of science or engineering under the supervision of a member of the staff. Students electing the course will be expected to carry out preliminary reading during the preceding term and to meet weekly with the staff member supervising the investigation. The course is open to qualified undergraduates with the consent of the Department Chair, and it may be elected more than once, or taken as a one-third course credit for each of three consecutive terms. A report describing the details of the investigation must be filed with the Department Chair at the completion of the course. May not be used to satisfy major requirements.

Prerequisite: permission of the Department Chair. (One-page proposal submission required.)

88. Honors Thesis

All terms: Arrange

Honors version of Engineering Sciences 86.

A course normally elected by honors students in one term of the senior year. The student will conduct a creative investigation suitable to the major subject under the supervision and guidance of a member of the staff. Students electing this course will be expected to begin the project work at least one term prior to electing Engineering Sciences 88 and may choose to conduct the preliminary investigation under Engineering Sciences 87. A major written report and oral presentation will be submitted at the completion of the course.

Engineering Sciences 88 be counted as an elective in the major if Engineering Sciences 190 is taken as the culminating experience.

Prerequisite: permission of the chair of the Honors program.

91. Numerical Methods in Computation (Identical to Mathematics 26 and Computer Science 26)

05F, 06F: 12

A study and analysis of important numerical and computational methods for solving engineering and scientific problems. The course will include methods for solving linear and nonlinear equations, doing polynomial interpolation, evaluating integrals, solving ordinary differential equations, and determining eigenvalues and eigenvectors of matrices. The student will be required to write and run computer programs.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 5 or 14 or Engineering Sciences 20. Dist: QDS. Shepherd.

92. Fourier Transforms and Complex Variables (Identical to Physics 70)

05F, 06F 2

Survey of a number of mathematical methods of importance in Engineering and Physics with particular emphasis on the Fourier transform as a tool for modeling and analysis. Orthogonal function expansions, Fourier series, discrete and continuous Fourier transforms, generalized functions and sampling theory, complex functions and complex integration, Laplace, Z, and Hilbert transforms. Computational Fourier analysis. Applications to linear systems, waves, and signal processing.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 33 or Engineering Sciences 22 and 23 or the equivalent. Dist: QDS. Österberg.

100. Methods in Applied Mathematics I (Identical to Physics 100)

05F, 06F: 11

Concepts and methods used in the treatment of linear equations with emphasis on matrix operations, differential equations, and eigenvalue problems will be developed following a brief review of analytic function theory. Topics include the Fourier integral, finite and infinite dimensional vector spaces, boundary value problems, eigenfunction expansions, Green’s functions, transform techniques for partial differential equations, and series solution of ordinary differential equations. Properties and uses of orthogonal polynomials and special functions such as the hypergeometric, Bessel, Legendre, and gamma functions are included. Applications in engineering and physics are emphasized.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 92 or Mathematics 33 or 43, with permission of instructor, or the equivalent. Viola.

103. Statistical Methods in Engineering

06W: Tu/Th 4-606S: 1207W: Tu/Th 4-607S: 12

The application of statistical techniques and concepts to maximize the amount and quality of information resulting from experiments. After a brief introductory summary of fundamental concepts in probability and statistics, topics considered will include probability distributions, sampling distributions, estimation and confidence intervals for parameters of statistical distributions, hypothesis testing, design and analysis of variance for single and multiple-factor experiments, regression analysis, estimation and confidence intervals for parameters of non-statistical models, and statistical quality control.

Prerequisites: Mathematics 13 or equivalent. Lasky (winter), Santos (spring).

104. Introduction to Optimization Methods

05F, 06F: 10A

An introduction to various methods of optimization and their use in problem-solving. Students will learn to formulate and analyze optimization problems and apply optimization techniques in addition to learning the basic mathematical principles on which these techniques are based. Topic coverage includes linear, nonlinear, and dynamic programming, and combinatorial optimization.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 13 or equivalent. K. Baker.

105. Computational Methods for Partial Differential Equations

06W, 07W: 11

This course concentrates on the numerical solution of partial differential equations commonly encountered in Engineering Sciences. Finite difference and finite element methods are used to solve problems in heat flow, wave propagation, vibrations, fluid mechanics, hydrology, and solid mechanics. The course materials emphasize the systematic generation of numerical methods for elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic problems, and the analysis of their stability, accuracy, and convergence properties. Weekly computer exercises will be required to illustrate the concepts discussed in class.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 23 and Engineering Sciences 91 (Mathematics 26 or Computer Science 26), or equivalents. Lynch.

106. Numerical Linear Algebra (Identical to Computer Science 106)

Not offered in the period from 05F through 07S

The course examines in the context of modern computational practice algorithms for solving linear systems Ax = b and Az = λx. Matrix decomposition algorithms, matrix inversion, and eigenvector expansions are studied. Algorithms for special matrix classes are featured, including symmetric positive definite matrices, banded matrices, and sparse matrices. Error analysis and complexity analysis of the algorithms are covered. The algorithms are implemented for selected examples chosen from elimination methods (linear systems), least squares (filters), linear programming, incidence matrices (networks and graphs), diagonalization (convolution), sparse matrices (partial differential equations). Offered in alternate years.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 26, Mathematics 26, or Engineering Sciences 91. Students are to be familiar with approximation theory, error analysis, direct and iterative technique for solving linear systems, and discretization of continuous problems to the level normally encountered in an undergraduate course in numerical analysis. Rockmore.

110. Signal Processing

06S, 07S: 2A

Continuous and discrete-time signals and systems. The Discrete Fourier Transform and the Fast Fourier Transform. Linear filtering of signals and noise. Characterization of random signals using correlation functions and power spectral densities. Problems will be assigned that require the

use of the computer.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 61 and 92 or equivalents. Akay.

112. Modern Information Technologies

07S: Arrange

This course covers current and emerging information technologies, focusing on their engineering design, performance and application. General topics such as distributed component and object architectures, wireless networking, web computing and information security will be covered. Specific subjects will include Java, CORBA, JINI public key cryptography, web search engine theory and technology, and communications techniques relevant to wireless networking such as Code Division Multiple Access protocols and cellular technology.

Prerequisites: Engineering Sciences 20, Engineering Sciences 103 and 67 or Computer Science 78. Engineering Sciences 103 can be taken concurrently. Cybenko.

115. Parallel Computing

Not offered in the period from 05F through 07S

Parallel computation, especially as applied to large scale problems. The three main topics are: parallel architectures, parallel programming techniques, and case studies from specific scientific fields. A major component of the course is laboratory experience using at least two different types of parallel machines. Case studies will come from such applications areas as seismic processing, fluid mechanics, and molecular dynamics.

Prerequisites: Engineering Science 91 (or Computer Science 26, Mathematics 26 or equivalent). Taylor.

116. Computer Engineering: Computer Architecture (Identical to Computer Science 107)

05F, 06F: 10

This course provides an introduction to the field of computer architecture. The history of the area will be examined, from the first stored program computer to current research issues. Topics covered will include successful and unsuccessful machine designs, cache memory, virtual memory, pipelining, instruction set design, RISC/CISC issues, and hardware/software tradeoffs. Readings will be from the text and an extensive list of papers. Assignments will include homeworks and a substantial project, intended to acquaint students with open questions in computer architecture.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 31 and Computer Science 37 (Computer Science 48, 58, or equivalent recommended). Berk.

120. Electromagnetic Fields and Waves

06W, 07W: 9

Properties of electromagnetic fields and waves in free space and in conducting and dielectric media. Reflection and transmission at boundaries. Transmission lines. Waveguides.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 23 or Physics 41. Pogue.

122. Semiconductor Theory and Devices (Identical to Physics 126)

06W: Arrange

Elementary physics (classical and quantum) is applied to create models for the behavior of semiconductor devices. The distribution of electron energy, the gap between energy bands, and the mechanisms of current flow are derived. The pn junction and its variations, bipolar junction transistor, junction field effect transistor, and MOSFET devices are studied. Other devices studied are chosen from among opto-electronic and heterojunction devices.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 24 and 32 or equivalents. Garmire.

123. Optics (Identical to Physics 123)

05F, 07S: Arrange

The physical principles and engineering applications of optics, with an emphasis on optical systems. Geometric optics: ray tracing, first-order analysis, imaging, radiometry. Wave optics: polarization, interference, diffraction, Fourier optics. Sources and detectors. Fiber optic systems.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 23 or Physics 41, and Engineering Sciences 92 or equivalent. Testorf.

124. Optical Devices and Systems (Identical to Physics 124)

07W: Arrange

Light has now taken its place beside electricity as a medium for information technology and for engineering and scientific instrumentation. Applications for light include telecommunications and computers, as well as instrumentation for materials science, biomedical, mechanical and chemical engineering. The principles and characteristics of lasers, detectors, lenses, fibers and modulators will be presented, and their application to specific optical systems introduced. The course will be taught in an interdisciplinary way, with applications chosen from each field of engineering. Students will choose design projects in their field of interest.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 23. Garmire.

125. Power Electronics and Electromechanical Energy Conversion

06S: 9

Controlled use of energy is essential in modern society. As advances in power electronics extend the capability for precise and efficient control of electrical energy to more applications, economic and environmental considerations provide compelling reasons to do so. In this class, the principles of power processing using semiconductor switching are introduced through study of pulse-width-modulated dc-dc converters. High-frequency techniques such as soft-switching are analyzed. Magnetic circuit modeling serves as the basis for transformer, inductor, and electric machine design. Electromechanical energy conversion is studied in relation to electrostatic and electromagnetic motor and actuator design. Applications to energy efficiency, renewable energy sources, robotics, and micro-electromechanical systems are discussed. Laboratory exercises lead to a project involving switching converters and/or electric machines.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 23 and 32. Sullivan.

126. Analog VLSI Systems Design

07S: 10A

Design methodologies of very large scale integration (VLSI) analog circuits as practiced in industry will be discussed.

Topics considered will include such practical design considerations as size and cost; technology processes; modeling of CMOS, bipolar, and diode devices; advanced circuit simulation techniques; basic building blocks; amplifiers; and analog systems. A design project is also required in which the student will design, analyze, and optimize a small analog or mixed analog/digital integrated circuit. This design and some homework assignments will require the student to perform analog and digital circuit simulations to verify circuit operation and performance. Lectures will be supplemented by guest lecturers from industry.

Prerequisites: Engineering Sciences 32 and 63, or permission. The staff.

130. Mechanical Behavior of Materials

05F, 06F: 9

A study of the mechanical properties of engineering materials and the influence of these properties on the design process. Topics include tensorial description of stress and strain, elasticity, plastic yielding under multiaxial loading, flow rules for large plastic strains, microscopic basis for plasticity, viscoelastic deformation of polymers, creep, fatigue, and fracture.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 24 and 33, or permission. Schulson.

131. Science of Solid State Materials

05F, 06F: 10; Laboratory

This course provides a background in solid state physics and gives students information about modern directions in research and application of solid state science. The course serves as a foundation for more advanced and specialized courses in the engineering of solid state devices and the properties of materials. The main subjects considered are crystal structure, elastic waves-phonones, Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein statistics, lattice heat capacity and thermal conductivity, electrons in crystals, electron gas heat capacity and thermal conductivity, metals, semiconductors, superconductors, dielectric and magnetic properties, and optical properties. Amorphous solids, recombination, photoconductivity, photoluminescence, injection currents, semiconductor lasers, high temperature superconductors, and elements of semiconductor and superconductor microelectronics are considered as examples.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 24 or Physics 23, or equivalent. Petrenko.

132. Thermodynamics and Kinetics in Condensed Phases

06W, 07W: 11; Laboratory

This course discusses the thermodynamics and kinetics of phase changes and transport in condensed matter, with the objective of understanding the microstructure of both natural and engineered materials. Topics include phase equilibria, atomic diffusion, interfacial effects, nucleation and growth, solidification of one-component and two-component systems, solubility, precipitation of gases and solids from supersaturated solutions, grain growth, and particle coarsening. Both diffusion-assisted and diffusionless or martensitic transformations are addressed. The emphasis is on fundamentals. Applications span the breadth of engineering, including topics such as polymer transformations, heat treatment of metals, processing of ceramics and semiconductors. Term paper.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 24 and 25, or equivalent. Schulson.

133. Diffraction Methods of Materials Analysis

Not offered in the period from 05F through 07S

This course discusses both the theoretical background and practical applications of x-ray diffraction and topography, and transmission electron diffraction and microscopy for examining the structure of materials. Topics include: phase-contrast imaging, diffraction contrast, kinematical and dynamical theories of diffraction, weak-beam imaging, image simulation, convergent-beam electron diffraction, phase identification, orientation determination, structure determination. Practical work consists of four laboratory sessions, each of which requires a short report.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 24 or permission. Baker.

135. Thin Films and Microfabrication Technology

06W: ArrangeOffered in alternate years

This course covers the processing aspects of semiconductor and thin film devices. Growth methods, metallization, doping, insulator deposition, patterning, and analysis are covered. There are two major projects associated with the course - an experimental investigation performed in an area related to the student’s research or interests, and a written and oral report on an area of thin film technology.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 24 or equivalent. Gibson, Levey.

137. Methods of Materials Characterization (Identical to Physics 128 and Chemistry 137)

06S, 07S: 2A

This survey course discusses both the physical principles and practical applications of the more common modern methods of materials characterization. It covers techniques of both microstructural analysis (OM, SEM, TEM, electron diffraction, XRD), and microchemical characterization (EDS, XPS, AES, SIMS, NMR, RBS and Raman spectroscopy), together with various scanning probe microscopy techniques (AFM, STM, EFM and MFM). Emphasis is placed on both the information that can be obtained together with the limitations of each technique. The course has a substantial laboratory component, including a project involving written and oral reports, and requires a term paper.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 24 or permission. I. Baker.

140. Applied Mechanics: Dynamics

06W: 2

The fundamentals of dynamics with emphasis on their application to engineering problems. Newtonian mechanics including kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies, work, energy, impulse, and momentum. Intermediate topics will include Lagrange’s equations, energy methods, Euler’s equations, rigid body dynamics, and the theory of small oscillations.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 22. Marra.

142. Intermediate Solid Mechanics

06W, 07W: 10

Exact and approximate solutions of the equations of elasticity are developed and applied to the study of stress and deformation in structural and mechanical elements. The topics will include energy methods, advanced problems in torsion and bending, stress concentrations, elastic waves and vibrations, and rotating bodies. Although most applications will involve elastic deformation, post-yield behavior of elastic-perfectly plastic bodies will also be studied. The course will also include numerous applications of finite element methods in solid mechanics.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 33 or permission of the instructor. Petrenko.

145. Modern Control Theory

06S, 07S: 10A

A continuation of Engineering Sciences 26, with emphasis on digital control, state-space analysis and design, and optimal control of dynamic systems. Topics include review of classical control theory; discrete-time system theory; discrete modeling of continuous-time systems; transform methods for digital control design; the state-space approach to control system design; optimal control; effects of quantization and sampling rate on performance of digital control systems. Laboratory exercises reinforce the major concepts; the ability to program a computer in a high-level language is assumed.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 26. Phan.

146. Computer-Aided Mechanical Engineering Design

06S, 07S: 2A

An investigation of techniques useful in the mechanical design process. Topics include computer graphics, computer-aided design, computer-aided manufacturing, computer-aided (finite element) analysis, and the influence of manufacturing methods on the design process. Project work will be emphasized. Enrollment is limited to 24 students.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 76. Ray.

150. Computational Fluid Dynamics

06S: 3A

The focus of the course is the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to solve real-life engineering problems. The basic conservation equations, theory of turbulence and different turbulence models are considered. A wide variety of fluid flows, heat transfer, and multiphase flow phenomena are studied. Numerical solution techniques are discussed as well as discretization of the flow geometry, i.e. grid generation. Students are required to complete several CFD projects.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 34, or permission of the instructor. Bakker.

151. Environmental Fluid Mechanics

07S: Arrange

Applications of fluid mechanics to natural flows of water and air in environmentally relevant systems. The course begins with a review of fundamental fluid physics with emphasis on mass, momentum and energy conservation. These concepts are then utilized to study processes that naturally occur in air and water, such as boundary layers, waves, instabilities, turbulence, mixing, convection, plumes and stratification. The knowledge of these processes is then sequentially applied to the following environmental fluid systems: rivers and streams, wetlands, lakes and reservoirs, estuaries, the coastal ocean, smokestack plumes, urban airsheds, the lower atmospheric boundary layer, and the troposphere. Interactions between air and water systems are also studied in context (for example, sea breeze in the context of the lower atmospheric boundary layer).

Prerequisites: Engineering Sciences 34 and Engineering Sciences 37, or equivalent. Cushman-Roisin.

155. Intermediate Thermodynamics

Not offered in the period from 05F through 07S

The concepts of work, heat, and thermodynamic properties are reviewed. Special consideration is given to derivation of entropy through information theory and statistical mechanics. Chemical and phase equilibria are studied and applied to industrial processes. Many thermodynamic processes are analyzed; the concept of exergy (availability) is used to evaluate their performance, and identify ways to improve their efficiency.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 25.

156. Heat, Mass, and Momentum Transfer

06S, 07S: 10

Fundamentals of convection, conduction, radiation, mass, and momentum transport. Basic conservation laws and rate equations in laminar and turbulent flows. Exact solutions. Approximate solutions using boundary layer or integral techniques. Empirical methods. Analysis of engineering systems.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 34. Petrenko.

158. Chemical Kinetics and Reactors

05F, 06F: 12

The use of reaction kinetics, catalyst formulation, and reactor configuration and control to achieve desired chemical transformations. The concepts and methods of analysis are of general applicability. Applications include combustion, fermentations, electrochemistry, and petrochemical reactions.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 36. Lynd.

159. Separations

06S: Arrange

A consideration of systems for separating mixtures such as a rise in chemically- or biologically-based processes either for production of desired products or waste treatment. After addressing the thermodynamics of separation and mixing, analysis and design of separation systems will be addressed relative to counter-current staged separations, chromatography, membrane separations, extraction, crystallization, and filtration/centrifugation.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 36 or permission. Lynd.

160. Biotechnology and Biochemical Engineering

05F, 06F: 9; Laboratory

A graduate section of Engineering Sciences 35 involving a project and extra class meetings. Not open to students who have taken Engineering Sciences 35.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 3, Chemistry 3 or 5, Biology 15 and permission of the instructor. Hogsett.

161. Metabolic Engineering

11Offered in alternate years

A consideration of practical and theoretical aspects of modifying metabolic pathways to produce products of interest. After reviewing basic principles of metabolism and the scope of the metabolic engineering field, case studies of metabolic engineering will be examined including detailed consideration at a genetic level. Thereafter, techniques and applications of metabolic modeling will be considered, including structured modeling and metabolic control theory.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 160, a non-introductory course in biochemistry or molecular biology, or permission. Gerngross, Lynd.

162. Methods in Biotechnology

07S: Arrange Offered in alternate years

This is a laboratory based course designed to provide hands on experience with modern biotechnological research, high throughput screening and production tools. The course provides familiarity with processes commonly used in the biotechnology industry. Examples include fermentation systems controlled by programmable logic controllers, down stream processing equipment such as continuous centrifugation, cross flow ultra-filtration and fluidized bed chromatography. The laboratory also demonstrates the substitution of routine molecular biological and biochemical operations by automated liquid handlers and laboratory robots. Students design and develop a bioassay, which is then implemented by laboratory robots for which they have to write their own implementation program. The course has a significant laboratory component.

Enrollment is limited to 12 students. Prerequisites: one from Engineering Sciences 35, 160, and 161, or one from Biology 61, 64, and 65. Gerngross.

165. Biomaterials

07S: Arrange

Consideration of material problems is perhaps one of the most important aspects of prosthetic implant design. The effects of the implant material on the biological system as well as the effect of the biological environment on the implant must be considered. In this regard, biomaterial problems and the bioelectrical control systems regulating tissue responses to cardiovascular and orthopedic implants will be discussed. Examples of prosthetic devices currently being used and new developments of materials appropriate for future use in implantation will be taken from the literature.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 24, or permission. J. Collier.

170. Topics in Environmental Science and Engineering

Not offered in the period from 05F through 07S

An interdisciplinary scientific investigation of contemporary global environmental issues.

Weekly seminars by distinguished environmental scientists form the basis of each week’s activity. A structured critical review of the literature will be prepared by each student for each week’s discussion. Additionally, each student will be responsible for compiling a term paper that goes beyond the class coverage of one of the weekly topics.

This course is open to graduate students in the sciences, and to advanced undergraduates by permission. Enrollment will normally be limited to 20, with emphasis on interdisciplinary participation within the Science Division.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing, or permission.

171. Industrial Ecology

06S, 07S: 3A

By studying the flow of materials and energy through industrial systems, industrial ecology identifies economic ways to lessen negative environmental impacts, chiefly by reducing pollution at the source, minimizing energy consumption, designing for the environment, and promoting sustainability. The objective of this course is to examine to what extent environmental concerns have already affected specific industries, and where additional progress can be made. With the emphasis on technology as a source of both problems and solutions, a broad spectrum of industrial activities is reviewed ranging from low-design high-volume to high-design low-volume products.

Students activities include a critical review of current literature, participation in class discussion, and a term project in design for the environment.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 21 and 37. Cushman-Roisin.

190. Engineering Design Methodology and Project Initiation

05F, 06F: 2A

This course explores elements of the engineering design process as a means of enhancing student ability in problem definition; development and evaluation of creative alternatives, application and methods of technical and economic analysis, identification and application of ethical and legal constraints, and effective presentation of technical information. Design projects are developed from specifications submitted by industry and other organizations and are pursued over the course of two quarters as a team project (190/290). Written and oral proposal and progress report are required for the design project during the term. A project advisor is required for each design team to serve as consultant to the team’s efforts. Engineering Sciences 190 is the first unit of a two-term course sequence (190/290) that must be taken consecutively.

For M.S. students, 190/290 can count as one core course and one elective.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 21 or permission of the instructor. Graves, Lasky.

200. Methods in Applied Mathematics II (Identical to Physics 110)

07S: 12

Continuation of Engineering Sciences 100 with emphasis on variational calculus, integral equations, and asymptotic and perturbation methods for integrals and differential equations. Selected topics include functional differentiation, Hamilton’s principle, Rayleigh-Ritz method, Fredholm and Volterra equations, integral transforms, Schmidt-Hilbert theory, asymptotic series, methods of steepest descent and stationary phase, boundary layer theory, WKB methods, and multiple-scale theory.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 100, or equivalent. The staff.

205. Computational Methods for Partial Differential Equations II

07S: 11Offered in alternate years

Boundary Element and spectral methods are examined within the numerical analysis framework established in Engineering Sciences 105. The boundary element method is introduced in the context of linear elliptic problems arising in heat and mass transfer, solid mechanics, and electricity and magnetism. Coupling with domain integral methods (e.g. finite elements) is achieved through the natural boundary conditions. Extensions to nonlinear and time-dependent problems are explored. Spectral methods are introduced and their distinctive properties explored in the context of orthogonal bases for linear, time-invariant problems. Extension to nonlinear problems is discussed in the context of fluid mechanics applications. Harmonic decomposition of the time-domain is examined for nonlinear Helmhotz-type problems associated with E&M and physical oceanography.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 105. Paulsen.

220. Electromagnetic Wave Theory

Not offered in the period from 05F through 07S

Continuation of Engineering Sciences 120, with emphasis on fundamentals of propagation and radiation of electromagnetic waves and their interaction with material boundaries. Propagation in homogeneous and inhomogeneous media, including anisotropic media; reflection, transmission, guidance and resonance, radiation fields and antennas; diffraction theory; scattering.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 100 and 120 or permission of the instructor.

250. Turbulence in Fluids

Not offered in the period from 05F through 07S

An introduction to the statistical theory of turbulence for students interested in research in turbulence or geophysical fluid dynamics. Topics to be covered include the statistical properties of turbulence; kinematics of homogeneous turbulence, phenomenological theories of turbulence; waves, instabilities, chaos and the transition to turbulence; analytic theories and the closure problem; diffusion of passive scalars; convective transport.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 150 or equivalent.

290. Engineering Design Methodology and Project Completion

06W, 07W: Arrange

This course is the second unit in the two-course, team engineering design sequence 190/ 290. The objective of the course is to develop the student’s professional abilities by providing a realistic project experience in engineering analysis, design, and development. Students continue with the design teams formed in Engineering Sciences 190 to complete their projects. Design teams are responsible for all aspects of their respective projects, which involve science, innovation, analysis, experimentation, economic decisions and business operations, planning of projects, patents, and relationships with clients. Mid-term and final oral presentations and written reports are required. A faculty member is assigned to each design team to serve as consultant to the team’s efforts.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 190. Collier, Graves.

ENGINEERING

Note: The list of courses available for undergraduate credit (for course count only) has been expanded. None of these courses serves in partial satisfaction of the Distributive Requirement.

127. VLSI Systems Design

07W: 12

The design methodology of Very Large Scale Integrated (VLSI) circuits as practiced in industry will be discussed. Topics considered will include a review of integrated Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) device basics, fundamental device configurations in circuits, logic circuit building blocks (inverters, latches, etc.), charge storage and sensing techniques, circuit modeling and analysis techniques, layout rules and their derivation, and circuit design checking tools. A design project is also required in which the student will design, analyze, and optimize a small CMOS circuit. This analysis and some homework assignments will require the student to perform analog circuit simulations to verify digital circuit performance. The project will then be fabricated by the MOSIS service and delivered in the Spring term. Final testing and evaluation are then performed. Grades will be withheld until these final steps are completed.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 32, 63 or permission. Cooley.

128. HDL-Based System Design

06W: 2

The methods, tools, and technology used in the design and synthesis of complex digital systems will be discussed, with emphasis on problems addressed in industry today. The course focus will be on the description, validation, and synthesis of systems slated for implementation as ASICs (application-specific integrated circuits). A major system design is undertaken in which the student will design, analyze, and optimize a macrocell of the CMOS ASIS circuit. This analysis and some homework assignments will require the student to perform circuit simulation, analysis, validation, and synthesis using the industry-standard hardware-description language Verilog as well as other appropriate CAD tools. By completion of the course, the student should have the skills necessary to contribute significantly to a Verilog-based chip design effort in industry or academic research.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 32 and 63 or permission of the instructor. Cooley.

129. Electronics in Instrumentation

Not offered in the period from 05F through 07S

Circuit and system theory applied to the analysis and design of electronic circuits and instruments. Frequency response and risetime of active networks: the Golden Number. Feedback amplifiers: quantitative determination of gain, frequency stability, transient response. Emphasis on the IC operational amplifier: characteristics, modeling of limitations, linear and non-linear applications. Signal processing: the instrumentation amplification and active Butterworth filter. Digital performance of semiconductor devices and circuits; switching, sampling, and gating. CAD:SPICE.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 26 or 61 or equivalent and Engineering Sciences 32 or equivalent.

138. Corrosion and Degradation of Materials

07W: Arrange

Application of the thermodynamics and kinetics of electrochemical reactions to the understanding of such corrosion phenomena as oxidation, passivity, stress corrosion cracking, and corrosion fatigue. Discussion of methods of corrosion control and prevention including alloy selection, environmental control, anodic and cathodic protection, and protective coatings. Some treatment of the environmental degradation of non-metals and polymers. Applications to current materials degradation problems in marine environments, petrochemical and metallurgical industries, and energy conversion systems.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 24 and Chemistry 5. Frost.

147. Tribology

Not offered in the period from 05F through 07S

A study of the interaction of material surfaces in relative motion. The concepts of friction, wear, surface mechanics and lubrication will be covered as will such topics as sliding surface temperature, properties of solid and liquid lubricants and surface topography. Applications considered include fluid film and rolling element bearings; brakes, seals and other machine components; metal forming and metal working; lubrication of human joints. Each student is required to complete an in-depth study of one specific area in tribology.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 34 and 76 or permission of the instructor. Kennedy.

148. Structural Mechanics

07W: 10A Offered in alternate years

Development and application of approximate and “exact�? analytical and computational methods of analysis to a variety of structural systems, including trusses, two- and three-dimensional frames, plates and/or shells. Modeling of structural systems as one and multi degree of freedom lumped systems permits analysis under a variety of dynamic loads as well as providing an introduction to vibration analysis.

Prerequisites: Engineering Sciences 33. Phan.

157. Chemical Process Design

06W, 07W: 3A

An in-depth exposure to the design of processes featuring chemical and/or biochemical transformations. Topics will feature integration of unit operations, simulation of system performance, sensitivity analysis, and system-level optimization. Process economics and investment return will be emphasized, with extensive use of the computer for simulation and analysis.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 36. Laser.

166. Physiology for Bioengineers

06S: ArrangeOffered in alternate years

This course is an introduction to physiological principles and concepts necessary for understanding basic regulatory phenomena and the pathophysiology of disease in living organisms. An analytical approach will be emphasized and terminology essential for understanding and describing these processes will be developed. The course will include some aspects of cellular biology, excitable tissue phenomena, cardiopulmonary and renal physiology, and neuroendocrine regulation of some of these processes.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Daubenspeck.

167. Medical Imaging

06F: 2Offered in alternate years

A comprehensive introduction to all major aspects of standard medical imaging systems used today. Topics include radiation, dosimetry, x-ray imaging, computed tomography, nuclear medicine, MRI, ultrasound, and imaging applications in therapy. The fundamental mathematics underlying each imaging modality is reviewed and an engineering picture of the hardware needed to implement each system is examined. The course will incorporate a journal club review of research papers, term tests, and a term project to be completed on an imaging system.

Prerequisites: Engineering Sciences 23 or permission of instructor. Pogue.

210. Spectral Analysis

Not offered in the period from 05F through 07S

An advanced treatment of digital signal processing for the analysis of time series. A study is made of parametric and nonparametric methods for spectral analysis. The course includes a review of probability theory, statistical inference, and the discrete Fourier Transform. Techniques are presented for the digital processing of random signals for the estimation of power spectra and coherency. Examples are taken from linear system theory and remote sensing using radar. Laboratory exercises will be assigned requiring the use of the computer.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 110.

212. Communications Theory

06W, 07W: Arrange

An advanced treatment of communications system engineering with an emphasis on digital signal transmission. The course includes a review of probability theory, random processes, modulation, and signal detection. Consideration will be given to channel modeling, the design of optimum receivers, and the use of coding.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 110. Cybenko.

230. Fatigue and Fracture

Not offered in the period from 05F through 07S

A study of the fracture and fatigue behavior of a wide range of engineering materials (metals, ceramics, polymers, biological materials and composites). Topics include; work of fracture, fracture mechanics (linear elastic, elastic-plastic and plastic), fracture toughness measurements, crack stability, slow crack growth, environmentally assisted cracking, fatigue phenomenology, the Paris Law and derivatives, crack closure, residual stress effects, random loading effects. These topics will be presented in the context of designing to avoid fracture and fatigue.

Prerequisite: Engineering 130 or permission of the instructor.

240. Kinematics and Dynamics of Machinery

Not offered in the period from 05F through 07S

A study of kinematics, dynamics, and vibrations of mechanical components. Topics will include: Kinematic analysis and synthesis of mechanisms, with applications to linkages, cams, gears, etc.; dynamics of reciprocating and rotating machinery; and mechanical vibrations. Computer aided design and analysis of kinematic and kinetic models.

Prerequisite: Engineering 140. Kennedy.

261. Biocommodity Engineering

07S: ArrangeOffered in alternate years

Biocommodity engineering is concerned with the biological production of large-scale, low unit value commodity products including fuels, chemicals, and organic materials. Intended primarily for advanced graduate students and drawing extensively from the literature, this course considers the emergence of biocommodity engineering as a coherent field of research and practice. Specific topics include feedstock and resource issues, the unit operations of biocommodity engineering - pretreatment, biological processing, catalytic processing, and separations - and the design of processes for biocommodity products.

Prerequisite: Engineering Sciences 157 and Engineering Sciences 161 and permission. Lynd, Wyman, Gerngross.

266. Physiological Control System Modeling

07S: Arrange

This course is designed to mingle the talents of engineering and life science graduate students in order to bring both analytical and biological expertise to bear upon significant problems in mathematical modeling of physiological systems. Techniques appropriate for steady state and dynamic systems analysis are reviewed with reference to specific physiological systems. Applied problems include the analysis of the respiratory control system, modeling the dynamics of cardiac muscle, and optimal control aspects of cardiorespiratory function. Students working in small groups will spend about half the term working on the development of an original mathematical simulation of a physiological system or on adaptation of an existing model to simulate a new aspect of physiological control.

Prerequisites: Engineering Sciences 26 and Engineering 166 (or equivalent life sciences background), or permission of the instructor. Daubenspeck.

ADVANCED GRADUATE COURSES

Courses at the 300 level are ‘advanced graduate’ courses, distinguished from 100 and 200-level courses by the standard of accomplishment that is required. These advanced graduate courses comprise an in-depth study of an area of engineering or engineering sciences up to the point where the student is able effectively to read and evaluate current literature in the field and to the point where the student should be ready to undertake original work in the field.

Most 300-level courses are tutorials. The small size of Thayer School allows students to work closely with professors - a significant feature in courses that are expected to provide in-depth study.

These courses reflect areas of significant faculty professional involvement or areas in which they are engaged in advanced research or development.

Please consult the Thayer School Bulletin for the 300 level courses, Tutorial courses, Engineering Management courses and Project, Research, Independent Study, Seminar and Workshop courses.