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English

Chair: Peter W. Travis

Vice-Chair: Barbara E. Will

Professors L. E. Boose, W. W. Cook, J. V. Crewe, G. H. Gerzina, E. Hebert, C. Huntington, T. H. Luxon, P. A. McKee, C. Mathis, D. E. Pease, L. A. Renza, P. Saccio, B. R. Silver, P. W. Travis, D. Wykes; Associate Professors P. W. Cosgrove, J. M. Favor, A. W. Halasz, A. L. McCann, M. C. Otter, I. T. Schweitzer, B. E. Will, M. F. Zeiger; Assistant Professors C. G. Boggs, M. A. Chaney, G. Edmondson, M. R. Goeman, J. J. Santa Ana; Instructor B. P. Giri; Senior Lecturers S. S. Grantham, B. Kreiger, T. Osborne, P. F. Sears; Lecturers S. D. Boone, S. B. Chaney, J. Donaghy, G. A. Lenhart, J. Mackin, W. Piper, M. Richards; Visiting Professors S. Castillo, W. P. Chin; Visiting Associate Professor N. J. Crumbine; Visiting Assistant Professors S. H. Brown, B. J. Dimmick; Adjunct Assistant Professors K. Gocsik, C. P. Thum.

THE ENGLISH MAJOR

Requirements: The Major in English requires the successful completion of eleven major courses.

1. The courses must satisfy the following distribution requirements according to the Course Groups, listed below: at least 2 courses from Group I; at least 2 courses from Group II; at least 1 course from Group III; at least 1 course from Group IV.

2. In addition, four courses must be selected as forming a concentration in one of the Concentration Areas listed below. Except in the case of students electing Concentration Area 3 (Literary History) these courses may also satisfy the Group requirements outlined above.

3. One course must be a Special Topics Course (English 60-69) or English 90 (Foreign Study Program [FSP]). This course may also satisfy one of the Group requirements outlined above and/or be part of the four-course concentration.

4. One course must be designated as satisfying the Culminating Experience Requirement; this may be an Advanced Seminar (70, 71, 72, 73, 75, or 85) or, in the case of students seeking a degree with Honors, the first term of English 98. This course may also be part of the four-course concentration, but cannot be used to satisfy any of the Course Group requirements. The Culminating Experience course must be taken and completed after the sophomore-junior summer term.

Students electing the major in English should bear in mind the following:

1. Transfer credits normally cannot be used in the major. Students wishing to be granted an exception must petition the CDC (Committee on Departmental Curriculum). If approval is granted, transfer courses are subject to the rules that apply to substitute courses.

2. Two substitute courses (appropriate major courses from other departments at Dartmouth)

are permitted within the major. One of those courses may be part of the concentration area. Students wishing to substitute more than one course in their concentration area must petition the CDC. Normally, substitute courses cannot satisfy the Course Group requirements.

3. No substitute courses may satisfy the Culminating Experience requirement.

4. To become an English major, students must consult with a professor from the list of faculty major advisors (posted in the department and on the web) to plan their concentration area. Students formally elect the major in English by submitting a proposed plan of courses - a completed major card - to their major advisor. The major advisor’s signature constitutes admission to the major. Students must meet with their major advisor a second time in the last term of the junior year or the first term of the senior year in order to review their major plan.

5. Students may petition the CDC to adjust a concentration area designation for a course. Such petitions must be endorsed by the faculty member teaching the course.

COURSE GROUPS

I. Literature before the mid-seventeenth century (2 courses required): 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 26, 27, 28, 39, 65, and 70.

II. Literature from the mid-seventeenth century to the end of the nineteenth century (2 courses required): 29, 30, 31, 32, 34, 36, 37, 38, 40, 41, 42, 43, 66, and 71.

III . Literature from the start of the twentieth century to the present (1 course required): 17, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 53, 54, 55, 58, 67, and 72.

IV. Criticism and Theory (1 course required): 14, 15, 16, 18, 59, 63, 75 and Comparative Literature 72.

Courses whose Course Group Assignment Varies: 60, 62, 90, 91, and 98.

Courses with no Course Group Assignment: 10, 11, 69, 74, 80, 81, 81, 83, 85, 96, and 97.

Courses that cannot count for major credit: 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 96 (except by successful petition to the CDC).

CONCENTRATION AREAS

A list of courses in each concentration is posted on the web and available in the English Department office.

1. Literary Theory and Criticism

Courses in this area stress questions on the nature of language and literature, problems in literary interpretation, the relations between readers and literary works, the history of criticism, and the various schools and theoretical approaches in literary analysis.

2. Genre

Students concentrating on genre should choose four courses dealing with one of following genres: poetry, drama, or narrative. Students wishing to deal with other genres or modes such as tragedy or pastoral or autobiography should formulate an independent proposal under Concentration Area 10.

3. Literary History

Students concentrating on literary history must select four additional courses from Course Groups I, II, and III in the following manner: two courses from Course Group I and one each from Course Groups II and III. A course not included in Course Groups I, II, and III may be included if it is posted under Literary History in the list of courses by concentration area.

4. Period Study

Students pursuing period study should select four courses from any one of the historical course groups (Course Groups I, II and III). Students may choose to have these four courses form a more precise focus such as medieval literature or Victorian studies.

5. National Traditions and Counter-Traditions

Courses in this area address literary works and critical methods that invoke or question national identity and its dominant narratives. Courses may also examine the ways in which nations are defined and national practices and consciousnesses are constructed or challenged.

6. Multicultural and Colonial / Postcolonial Studies

Courses in this area focus on literature in English other than British or American and on British or American literature that addresses colonial/post-colonial experience. The concentration involves attention to critical perspectives and theories on race, ethnicity, migration, colonialism, transnationalism, and globalization.

7. Genders and Sexualities

Literary works and critical approaches that address, represent, or critique ideas of gender and sexual identity. This area includes courses on sexuality, feminism, gay and lesbian studies, masculinity, and queer theory.

8. Cultural Studies and Popular Culture

Literary works, critical approaches and theories that draw together social, literary, and cultural discourses or challenge distinctions such as those between high and low culture, canonical and non-canonical literature, or the disciplines themselves. Courses in this area focus on issues such as class, the production of cultural value, the materiality of texts, and the social practices of reading, writing, and representation.

9. Creative Writing

Students electing a concentration in Creative Writing must pass the prerequisite course, English 80, prior to enrolling in any other Creative Writing course. Courses satisfying this Concentration Area must include:

One course selected from English 81, 82, or 83.

English 85, the advanced seminar in Creative Writing.

A course in contemporary poetry, fiction, prose non-fiction or drama in the English department, or a writing course offered by another department (screen writing in Film and Television Studies, play writing in Theater, nature writing in Environmental Studies, for example).

Another course in contemporary poetry, fiction, prose non-fiction or drama in the English department, or a writing course offered by another department (screen writing in Film and Television Studies, play writing in Theater, nature writing in Environmental Studies, for example), or a senior project: either English 97 (one-term) or English 98 (two-term honors project), or a second course chosen from English 81, 82, and 83.

Please note that enrollment in all intermediate Creative Writing courses requires the submission of a writing sample and the permission of the instructor. Students in their sixth term of residence will enroll as English majors with a Concentration Area of Creative Writing; however the Creative Writing staff will review the candidacy of all prospective Creative Writing majors.

10. Independent Proposal

Students may propose, by petition to the Committee on the Departmental Curriculum, a Concentration Area different from those listed above. Such proposals, together with a written rationale, must be submitted before the end of the junior year.

MODIFIED MAJORS

Students may propose a modified major in English by designing a special program of study in consultation with a faculty adviser in the Department. One may modify the major in English with a selection of courses from other departments and programs, or one may modify a major in another department or program with a selection of English courses. In both cases the modifying courses nominated must be courses that qualify for major credit in their home department or program. The Culminating Experience should be satisfied according to the primary department’s or program’s rules. Proposals for modifying the major in English should also explain the rationale for modifying the standard major and show how each of the modifying courses relates to the Concentration Area selected.

Proposals for both kinds of modified majors must be submitted to the Vice Chair of the English Department as a formal petition and proposal. Proposals to modify another major with English courses must be approved by the Vice Chair of English before going forward to the primary department or program for final approval as a major program. Proposals to modify the major in English with other courses must be submitted, along with an authorizing signature from the secondary department or program, to the Vice Chair of English and the CDC for their deliberation and approval. The Vice Chair’s signature signifies final approval of a modified major in English.

Modified major in which English is the primary subject:

Requirements: This major requires the successful completion of eleven major courses.

1. All students proposing a modified major with English as the primary department must complete at least 2 courses from Group I; at least 2 courses from Group II; at least 1 course from Group III; at least 1 course from Group IV.

2. In addition, proposals for this modified major must elect Concentration Area number 10 (Independent Proposal) to satisfy the Concentration Area requirement. The proposal for a modified major in English also serves as a proposal for an independently proposed Concentration Area. At least one and no more than two of the four modifying courses selected from other department or program offerings must be included in the independently proposed Concentration Area.

3. Four courses from another department or program must be selected, approved by the CDC, and completed successfully. One or two of these courses must form part of the independent proposal for a Concentration Area.

4. One course must be a Special Topics (63-68) Course or English 90. This course may also satisfy one of the Group requirements outlined above and/or be part of the four-course concentration.

5. One course must be designated as satisfying the Culminating Experience Requirement; this may be an Advanced Seminar (70, 71, 72, 73, 75, or 85), or, in the case of students seeking a degree with Honors, the first term of English 98. This course may be part of the four-course concentration, but may not satisfy any of the Course Group requirements. The Culminating Experience course must be taken and completed after the sophomore-junior summer term.

Modified major in other departments or programs modified with English courses.

Requirements: Four English courses selected from those numbered 10-75 and 90-91. No substitutions or transfer credits are permitted.

THE MINOR IN ENGLISH

The minor in English requires the successful completion of six major courses. Four courses must be selected as forming a concentration in one of the Concentration Areas listed above. No substitutions and no more than one transfer credit will be permitted.

THE MAJOR IN ENGLISH WITH HONORS

Students enrolled in the major in English who have completed at least six major courses by the end of their junior year and have a grade point average (GPA) in the major of 3.4 or higher and an overall college GPA of 3.0 or higher may apply for the Honors Program. Eligible students apply by submitting their college record to the Honors Directors along with a formal proposal of an honors thesis. Students formally approved and enrolled in Creative Writing as a Concentration Area normally propose a creative writing project as a thesis. Students with other Concentration Areas normally propose a critical thesis. The thesis may be completed during one or two terms of English 98, the first of which counts as the Culminating Experience in the major. The second English 98 constitutes a twelfth course in the major program, separate from all other requirements outlined above. The theory requirement should be satisfied before the term in which the candidate completes the honors thesis and submits it for evaluation. That is, no one may satisfy the theory requirement and the thesis requirement in the same term.

For complete information about applying to and successfully completing the Honors Program, including further regulations, deadlines, and advice, please consult the Directors of Honors.

ENGLISH STUDY ABROAD

The English Department offers three Foreign Study Programs (FSPs), one offered annually at the University of Glasgow and two held biennially in alternating years: Dublin (2005, 2007) and Trinidad (2006, 2008). All English FSPs are held during the fall academic term. Participation in all three English FSPs is open to all sophomores, juniors, and seniors. To participate in the program for a given year, students must have completed all first-year requirements and one English course (other than 2, 3, 5 or 7) with a grade of B or better. (The English course requirement may, in certain circumstances, be waived by the director.) To be considered for acceptance to the Trinidad FSP, students should, in addition to the prerequisites listed above, have completed either the English Department’s “Introduction to Postcolonial Literature” (English 58) or a course deemed equivalent by the FSP director for that year.

Students enrolled on English FSPs register for English 90, 91, and 92. Students who successfully complete any of the three English FSPs will be awarded credit for English 90, English 91, and English 92. English 90 and English 91 will carry major or minor credit; English 92 will carry one non-major college credit. In no case will students receive more than two major or minor credits in English for work completed on an English FSP. The major requirements satisfied by English 90 and 91 vary with each program. For specific information on FSPs and major requirements consult with the FSP directors and the English Department’s website at URL <www.dartmouth.edu/~english>.

Please check the English Department website for up-to-date information on course offerings

http://www.dartmouth.edu/~english/

SECTION I: NON-MAJOR COURSES

6. Essay Writing

Not offered in 2005-2006, may be offered in 2006-2007

Limit 12. Open to students who are interested in analytic and expository writing. Students who wish to register must sign up with the Administrative Assistant of the Department of English and attend the first class. This course does not carry major credit. Priority will be at the discretion of the instructor. This course will be taught Credit/No Credit unless otherwise stated. Dist: LIT.

7. First-Year Seminars in English

Consult special listings

8. Readings in English and American Literature

05F: 1106S: 2A, 2A

A survey of writers and topics of general interest. The course is intended principally for students who are not majoring in English. It does not carry major credit. Writing requirements will be limited to tests and brief exercises. To be offered periodically, but with varying subject matter.

In 05F at 11(section 1) and in 06S at 2A (section 2), Introduction to Literary Study. This course is an introduction to literary study at the college level.þ Although content varies from year to year, the course examines both literary texts and the kinds of language used in literary criticism.þ It asks in what ways we read and interpret literary texts and what tools are used to accomplish this.þ Such features of literary meaning as image, character, narrative, structure, and sound will be covered, and students will learn the analytical skills necessary for writing about literature.

Although the course is equally suitable for majors and non-majors, it can be used as a introduction to the major, providing some basic understanding of the fields of inquiry currently most central in literary studies, and on which the structure of our major is based.þ Some or all of the following topics may be included:þ literary genre; poetry and poetics; relevant literary and intellectual history; national traditions and countertraditions; colonial and postcolonial studies; cultural studies and popular culture; oral interpretation as criticism.þ Race, ethnicity, gender and sexual identity will be considered in their literary manifestations. This course does not carry English major credit. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Edmondson, Huntington.

In 06S at 2A (section 3), Journalism: Literature and Practice. This course will explore the role of print journalism in shaping the modern American literary, cultural and political landscape - from Nellie Bly’s late 19th century undercover exposure to Seymour Hersh’s coverage of the Iraq War. Students will also participate in an intensive weekly workshop on reporting and writing, with a short unit on radio commentary. This course does not carry English major credit. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Jetter.

9. Composition: Theory and Practice (Identical to, and described under, Writing 9)

07S: Arrange

This course does not carry English major credit. Dist: ART. Gocsik.

SECTION II: MAJOR COURSES

10. The King James Version of the Bible, I

Not offered in 2005-2006, may be offered in 2006-2007

A study of the preeminent English translation of the Hebrew Bible (the Tanak, or Old Testament), with special emphasis on its relationship to English literature and on the history of its interpretation. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. CA tag Genre-narrative. Wykes.

11. The King James Version of the Bible, II

06S: 1007S: Arrange

A study of the preeminent English translation of the Christian scriptures (New Testament), with special emphasis on their revision of the Hebrew Bible, on their relationship to English literature, and on the history of their interpretation. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. CA tag Genre-narrative. Wykes.

14. Introduction to Criticism

Not offered in 2005-2006, may be offered in 2006-2007

A historical and formal introduction to literary criticism as a 20th-century discipline, with primary emphasis on English and American contributors. Leading critical figures and critical approaches will be considered; some important critical terms will be reviewed; and students will be given practice in close reading and textual interpretation. Selections from the work of some or all of the following may be included: T.S. Eliot, I.A. Richards, Cleanth Brooks, Kenneth Burke, William Wimsatt, Northrop Frye, Wayne Booth, Paul de Man, Stanley Fish, Harold Bloom, Barbara Johnson, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, and Henry Louis Gates. Complementing English Department courses in particular literary periods, topics, and authors, this course is strongly recommended for majors. Dist: LIT. Course Group IV. CA tag Literary Theory and Criticism.

15. Introduction to Literary Theory

05F: 1106S: 206F, 07S: Arrange

The course will introduce students to some of the leading texts, concepts, and practices of what has come to be known as theoretical criticism. Topics to be considered may include some of the following: structuralism, deconstruction, psychoanalysis, feminism, new historicism, post-colonialism, post-modernism, queer theory, and cultural studies. Attention will also be given to historical and institutional contexts of this criticism. Intended to provide a basic, historically informed, knowledge of theoretical terms and practices, this course should enable students to read contemporary criticism with understanding and attempt theoretically informed criticism themselves. Dist: LIT. Course Group IV. CA tag Literary Theory and Criticism. Travis, Will, Boggs, Edmondson.

16. Old and New Media

06S: 10A07S: Arrange

A survey of the historical, formal, and theoretical issues that arise from the materiality and technology of communication, representation, and textuality. The course will address topics in and between different media, which may include oral, scribal, print, and digital media. Readings and materials will be drawn from appropriate theorists, historians, and practitioners, and students may be asked not only to analyze old and new media, but also create with them. Dist: LIT. Course Group IV. CA tags Cultural Studies and Popular Culture, Literary Theory and Criticism. Halasz.

17. Introduction to New Media

Not offered in 2005-2006, may be offered in 2006-2007

This course introduces students to the history, aesthetics, and theory of new media. These forms include hypertextual fiction, web-based artwork, virtual reality, experimental CD-ROMs, and multimedia performance and installation. Engaging the work of such authors and artists as Laurie Anderson, etoy, jodi, Guillermo Gomez-Peña, the Wooster Group, Emergency Broadcasting Network, Brenda Laurel, and Michael Rush, we will address several questions, including how to evaluate and perhaps produce work that combines text, image, sound, and interactivity. Dist: ART. Course Group III. CA tags Cultural Studies and Popular Culture, Literary Theory and Criticism.

18. A History of the English Language (Identical to and described under Linguistics 18)

06W: 1007W: Arrange

Dist: LIT. Course Group IV. CA tags Cultural Studies and Popular Culture, Literary Theory and Criticism, National Traditions and Countertraditions. Otter, Pulji.

19. Anglo-Saxon and Scandinavian Epic and Saga

Not offered in 2005-2006, may be offered in 2006-2007

An introduction to Old English language and literature, this course concentrates on reading, translating and interpreting selected poems understood in terms of their cultural environment - political, historical, artistic, and religious. The major poems studied are ‘The Wanderer,’ ‘The Dream of the Rood,’ and Beowulf. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group I. CA tags National Traditions and Countertraditions, Genre-narrative. Travis.

20. Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales

05F: 1006F: Arrange

An introduction to Chaucer, concentrating on ten of the Canterbury Tales, and studying him as a social critic and literary artist. Special attention will be paid to Chaucer’s language, the sounds of Middle English, and the implications of verse written for the ear. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group I. CA tags Genre-poetry, Genre-narrative. Travis, Otter, Edmondson.

21. Chaucer: Troilus and Other Poems

Not offered in 2005-2006, may be offered in 2006-2007

A study of Chaucer’s works other than the Canterbury Tales, focusing on some of the early dream visions (Book of the Duchess, House of Fame) and the courtly love romance Troilus and Criseyde, which many consider Chaucer’s most accomplished work. Some attention will be given to the French and Italian context of these works (in translation). Prior acquaintance with Middle English (English 20, 22, or 18) is helpful but not absolutely required. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group I. CA tags Genre-poetry, Genders and Sexualities Travis, Otter, Edmondson.

22. Medieval English Literature

Not offered in 2005-2006, may be offered in 2006-2007

An introduction to the literature of the “Middle English” period (ca. 1100- ca. 1500), concentrating on the emergence of English as a literary language in the twelfth and early thirteenth centuries and on some of the great masterworks of the late fourteenth century. Readings will include early texts on King Arthur, the lais of Marie de France, the satirical poem The Owl and the Nightingale, the romance Sir Orfeo, Pearl, and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, the Book of Margery Kempe, and the York Cycle. Most readings in modern English translation, with some explorations into the original language. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group I. CA tags Cultural Studies and Popular Culture, National Traditions and Countertraditions. Travis, Otter, Edmondson.

23. The English Renaissance

06W: 1007W: Arrange

English verse and prose of the sixteenth century: a study of Wyatt, Gascoigne, Nashe, Marlowe, Sidney, Spenser, Shakespeare, and others in the cultural context of Tudor England. The course will investigate issues of classical and European influence, publication, and courtly patronage, especially under the auspices of a female ruler (Elizabeth I). Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group I. CA tags Genders and Sexualities, Genre-poetry. Halasz, Crewe.

24. Shakespeare I

05F: 906X: Arrange06F: 9

A study of about ten plays spanning Shakespeare’s career, including comedies, histories, tragedies, and romances. Attention will be paid to Shakespeare’s language; to his dramatic practices and theatrical milieu; and to the social, political, and philosophical issues raised by the action of the plays. Videotapes will supplement the reading. Exercises in close reading and interpretative papers. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group I. CA tag Genre-drama. Saccio, Boose, Crewe, Luxon.

26. English Drama to 1642

Not offered in 2005-2006, may be offered in 2006-2007

A study of commercial theater in London from about 1570 until the closing of the theaters in 1642. Anonymous and collaborative plays will be read as well as those by such playwrights as Kyd, Marlowe, Dekker, Jonson, Webster, and Ford. The course will focus on the economic, social, political, intellectual, and theatrical conditions in which the plays were originally produced, on their continuing performance, and on their status as literary texts. Research into the performance history of a play or participation in a scene production is required. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group I. CA tags Genre-drama, Genders and Sexualities. Boose, Halasz.

27. The Seventeenth Century

Not offered in 2005-2006, may be offered in 2006-2007

English poetry and prose from 1603 to 1660. Primary focus on major lyric tradition including poems by John Donne, Ben Jonson, Mary Wroth, George Herbert, Andrew Marvell, Richard Crashaw, Henry Vaughan, and John Milton. Secondary focus on significant prose works of intellectual history (Francis Bacon, Robert Burton) and political controversy (debates about gender and/or political order). Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group I. CA tag Genre-poetry. Luxon, Crewe.

28. Milton

Not offered in 2005-2006, may be offered in 2006-2007

A study of most of Milton’s poetry and of important selections from his prose against the background of political and religious crises in seventeenth-century England. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group I. CA tags Genre-poetry, Genders and Sexualities. Luxon.

29. English Literature 1660-1714, Including Drama

Not offered in 2005-2006, may be offered in 2006-2007

A survey of English literary culture in the reigns of the later Stuart monarchs. Poetry by Dryden, Marvell, Rochester, Butler, Oldham and Pope; biographical writing by Aubrey, Halifax, Lucy Hutchinson, and Margaret Cavendish; the diaries of Pepys and Evelyn; spiritual autobiography and religious fiction by Bunyan; prose satires and analytical prose of Swift and Halifax. Within the survey there will be two areas of special attention: the theatre and the literary response to public events. We will read three plays by such authors as Dryden, Wycherley, Congreve, Lee, Behn, Shadwell, Otway and Farquahar, and study the writing in response to such events as the Great Plague and Fire of 1666, the Popish Plot, and the Exclusion Crisis. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group II. CA tag-drama. Wykes.

30. Order and Disorder in British Neoclassicism

Not offered in 2005-2006, may be offered in 2006-2007

English literature from 1660 to 1789 is concerned with the problems of regulation and excess. The return to a traditional stability promised by the neoclassical aesthetic veils a threat from new dynamics in art and politics. The role of the imagination in life and art, ideals of political liberty, the emergence of women’s writing, all contribute to the underlying tensions. Readings will be chosen from among John Dryden, Jonathan Swift, Daniel Defoe, Alexander Pope, Mary Astell, Anne Finch, Frances Burney, Oliver Goldsmith, Samuel Johnson, William Cowper and George Crabbe. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group II. CA tag National Traditions and Countertraditions. Cosgrove.

31. Sensibility and the Self in Eighteenth-Century British Literature

Not offered in 2005-2006, may be offered in 2006-2007

The eighteenth century is a period of innovation in relation of self to society. From the Earl of Rochester to Robert Burns there is a shift from an exterior self determined by social status to an interior self defined by the perturbations of sensibility. Both male and female writers use literary models and the expansion of print technology to construct a less conventionalized self. Readings will include Aphra Behn, Alexander Pope, Jonathan Swift, Mary Wortley Montague, James Thomson, Mary Leapor, William Collins, Thomas Gray, Samuel Johnson, James Boswell, Olaudah Equiano. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group II. CA tags National Traditions and Countertraditions, Genre-narrative. Cosgrove.

32. The Rise of the Novel

05F: 1006F: Arrange

A study of the eighteenth-century English novel, with emphasis on formal variations within the genre as well as on interrelations of formal, political, and psychological elements of the narratives. Reading may include works by Daniel Defoe, Eliza Haywood, Samuel Richardson, Henry Fielding, Tobias Smollett, Oliver Goldsmith, Frances Burney, and Elizabeth Inchbald, as well as twentieth-century criticism. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group II. Genre-narrative. Cosgrove.

34. Romantic Literature: Writing and English Society, 1780-1832

06S: 1007S: Arrange

This course offers a critical introduction to the literature produced in Britain at the time of the Industrial Revolution, the French Revolution, and the Napoleonic wars.There will be a strong emphasis throughout the course on the specific ways in which historical forces and social changes shape and are at times shaped by the formal features of literary texts. The question of whether romantic writing represents an active engagement with or an escapist idealization of the important historical developments in this period will be a continuous focus. Readings include works by Blake, Wordsworth, Helen Maria Williams, Edmund Burke, Thomas Paine, Mary Wollstonecraft, Robert Southey, Coleridge, Percy Shelley, Mary Shelley, Keats, and Clare. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group II. CA tag National Traditions and Countertraditions. Will, McCann.

36. Victorian Literature and Culture, 1837-1859

05F: 1106F: Arrange

This course examines early Victorian poetry, prose and fiction in the context of cultural practices and social institutions of the time. We will locate cultural concerns among, for example, those of capitalism, political reform, scientific knowledge, nation and empire. And we will consider revisions of space, time, gender, sexuality, class, and public and private life that characterized formations of British identity during this period. Texts may include work by Charles Dickens, Thomas Carlyle, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Charlotte Bronte, John Ruskin, Charles Darwin. We will also read selections from recent criticism of Victorian culture. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group II. CA tag Cultural Studies and Popular Culture. McKee, McCann.

37. Victorian Literature and Culture, 1860-1901

06W: 1007W: Arrange

This course examines later nineteenth-century British poetry, prose and fiction in the context of cultural practices and social institutions of the time. We will locate cultural concerns among, for example, those of capitalism, political reform, scientific knowledge, nation and empire. And we will consider revisions of space, time, gender, sexuality, class, and public and private life that characterized formations of British identity during this period. Texts may include work by George Eliot, Matthew Arnold, Christina Rossetti, Algernon Swinburne, Thomas Hardy, Rudyard Kipling. We will also read selections from recent criticism of Victorian culture. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group II. CA tag Cultural Studies and Popular Culture. McKee, McCann.

38. The Nineteenth-Century English Novel

06S: 10A07S: Arrange

A study of the nineteenth-century novel focussing on the Victorian novel’s representation of public and private categories of experience. Readings may include Shelley’s Frankenstein, Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights, Thackeray’s Vanity Fair, Dickens’ Bleak House, George Eliot’s Middlemarch, Mrs. Henry Wood’s East Lynne and Thomas Hardy’s The Return of the Native. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group II. CA tag Genre-narrative. McKee, Gerzina.

39. Early American Literature

06S: 2A07S: Arrange

This course surveys the literature of the first settlers in the New World up to the American Revolution, focusing on writers in English and highlighting the major controversies that erupted during this period. We will focus on European attitudes towards and fantasies about the New World, how the settlers imagined masculinity and femininity, and represented indigenous and enslaved peoples. We will examine the frontier as a zone of inter-cultural contact, and look at the idea of “nationhood” that emerges from it. Some of the writers we will study are John Winthrop, Anne Bradstreet, Edward Taylor, Roger Williams, Cotton Mather, Mary Rowlandson, Jonathan Edwards, Mercy Otis Warren, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Abigail and John Adams, Judith Sargent Murray. This provides a foundation for English 40, 41, 42, 43. There are no prerequisites, but courses in early US history, or English 15 are highly recommended. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group I. CA tags Multicultural and Colonial/ Postcolonial Studies, National Traditions and Countertraditions. Schweitzer.

40. American Poetry

Not offered in 2005-2006, may be offered in 2006-2007

This course concentrates on the three major American poets writing in English before 1900: Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, and Herman Melville. The work of these three will preoccupy the readings, lectures, discussions, and examinations for the course. For their two required papers, however, students will choose poems by any two other Anglo-American writers of the period for close investigation. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group II. CA tags Genre-poetry, National Traditions and Countertraditions. Cook.

41. American Prose

05F: 1106F: Arrange

Readings of nonfiction narratives by such American writers as Franklin, Emerson, Thoreau, Henry Adams, Gertrude Stein, Hemingway, and Jack Kerouac. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group II. CA tags Genre-narrative, National Traditions and Countertraditions. Boggs, Renza.

42. American Fiction to 1900

06W: 1007W: Arrange

A survey of the first century of U.S. fiction, this course focuses on historical contexts as well as social and material conditions of the production of narrative as cultural myth. The course is designed to provide an overview of the literary history of the United States novel from the National Period to the threshold of the Modern (1845-1900). To do justice to the range of works under discussion, the lectures will call attention to the heterogeneous cultural contexts out of which these works have emerged as well as the formal and structural components of the different works under discussion. In keeping with this intention, the lectures include the so-called classic texts in American literature The Last of the Mohicans, Moby Dick, The Scarlet Letter, The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, but also the newly canonized Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, Life in the Iron Mills, Hope Leslie in the hope that the configuration of these works will result in an understanding of the remarkable complexity of United States literary culture. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group II. CA tags National Traditions and Countertraditions, Cultural Studies and Popular Culture. Renza, Pease, Boggs.

43. Early Black American Literature (Identical to African and African American Studies 34)

06S: 10A07S: Arrange

A study of the foundations of Black American literature and thought, from the colonial period through the era of Booker T. Washington. The course will concentrate on the way in which developing Afro-American literature met the challenges posed successively by slavery, abolition, emancipation, and the struggle to determine directions for the twentieth century. Selections will include: Wheatley, Life and Works; Brown, Clotel; Douglass, Narrative; Washington, Up from Slavery; DuBois, Souls of Black Folk; Dunbar, Sport of the Gods; Chestnut, House Behind the Cedars; Harriet Wilson, Our Nig; Johnson, The Autobiography of an Ex-Coloured Man; and poems by F. W. Harper, Paul L. Dunbar and Ann Spencer. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group II. CA tags National Traditions and Countertraditions, Cultural Studies and Popular Culture. Cook, Favor.

45. Native American Literature (Identical to Native American Studies 35)

06S: 1107S: Arrange

Published Native American writing has always incorporated a cross-cultural perspective that mediates among traditions. The novels, short stories, and essays that constitute the Native American contribution to the American literary tradition reveal the literary potential of diverse aesthetic traditions. This course will study representative authors with particular emphasis on contemporary writers. Open to all classes. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Course Group III. CA tags National Traditions and Countertraditions, Multicultural and Colonial/ Postcolonial Studies. Goeman.

46. Twentieth-Century American Fiction: 1900 to World War II

Not offered in 2005-2006, may be offered in 2006-2007

A study of major American fiction in the first half of the twentieth century. Works by Dreiser, Stein, Fitzgerald, Cather, Larsen and Faulkner, and a changing list of others. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group III. CA tag National Traditions and Countertraditions. Will.

47. American Drama

06S: 1007S: Arrange

A study of major American playwrights of the 19th and 20th centuries including S. Glaspell, O’Neill, Hellman, Wilder, Hansberry, Guare, Williams, Wilson, Mamet, Miller, Albee, Shepard, Wasserstein. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group III. CA tags National Traditions and Countertraditions, Genre-drama. Pease, Cook.

48. Contemporary American Fiction

05F: 1106F: Arrange

Contemporary American fiction introduces the reader to the unexpected. Instead of conventionally structured stories, stereotypical heroes, traditional value systems, and familiar uses of language, the reader finds new and diverse narrative forms. Such writers as Toni Morrison, Thomas Pynchon, Maxine Hong Kingston, Leslie Silko, Norman Mailer, Don DeLillo, and Ralph Ellison, among others, have produced a body of important, innovative fiction expressive of a modern American literary sensibility. The course requires intensive class reading of this fiction and varied critical writing on postmodernism. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group III. CA tags Genre-narrative, National Traditions and Countertraditions. Favor.

49. Modern Black American Literature (Identical to African and African American Studies 35)

06W: 1207W: Arrange

A study of African American literature from the Harlem Renaissance to the present, this course will focus on emerging and diverging traditions of writing by African Americans. We shall also investigate the changing forms and contexts of ‘racial representation’ in the United States. Works may include those by Hurston, Hughes, Wright, Ellison, Morrison, Schuyler, West, Murray, Gates, Parks. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group III. CA tags National Traditions and Countertraditions, Cultural Studies and Popular Culture. Favor.

50. American and British Poetry Since 1914

06W: 10A07W: Arrange

A survey of modern American and British poetry since the First World War, with particular emphasis on the aesthetics, philosophy and politics of modernism. The course covers such canonical and non-canonical poets as Yeats, Pound, HD, Lawrence, Eliot, Stevens, Frost, Williams, Crane, Moore, Millay, Auden, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Beats. Dist: LIT; Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU or NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group III. CA tags Genre-poetry, National Traditions and Countertraditions. Zeiger, Cook.

53. Twentieth-Century British Fiction: 1900 to World War II

Not offered in 2005-2006, may be offered in 2006-2007

A study of major authors, texts, and literary movements, with an emphasis on literary modernism and its cultural contexts. We will read works by Conrad, Forster, Joyce, Woolf, Lawrence, Rhys, and Beckett, as well as writers such as Kipling, Ford, West, Waugh, Bowen, and Lowry. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group III. CA tags Genre-narrative, National Traditions and Countertraditions. Silver.

54. Modern British Drama

Not offered in 2005-2006, may be offered in 2006-2007

Major British plays since the 1890s. The course begins with the comedy of manners as represented by Oscar Wilde and Noel Coward. It then considers innovations in and rebellions against standard theatrical fare: the socialist crusading of Bernard Shaw; the angry young men (John Osborne) and workingclass women (Shelagh Delaney) of the 1950s; the minimalists (Samuel Beckett, Harold Pinter) and the university wits (Tom Stoppard); the dark comedians of the modern family (Alan Ayckbourn) and the politically inflected playwrights of the age of Prime Minister Thatcher (Caryl Churchill, Timberlake Wertenbaker, David Hare). The course deals both with the evolution of dramatic forms and the unusually close way in which modern British theatre has served a mirror for British life from the heyday of the Empire to the present. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group III. CA tags Genre-drama, National Traditions and Countertraditions. Saccio.

55. Twentieth-Century British Fiction: World War II to the Present

Not offered in 2005-2006, may be offered in 2006-2007

A study of the multiple currents within British fiction in a period characterized by major literary, cultural, and social transitions in Britain, including the emergence of a “post”(-war, -empire, -modern) sensibility. Writers may include Amis, Sillitoe, Greene, Golding, Burgess, Lessing,

Wilson, Carter, Swift, Atkinson, MacLaverty, Ishiguro, Barker, Barnes, McKewan, Smith. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group III. CA tags Genre-narrative, National Traditions and Countertraditions. Giri.

58. Introduction to Postcolonial Literature (Identical to African and African American Studies 65)

06W: 1107W: Arrange

An introduction to the themes and foundational texts of postcolonial literature in English. We will read and discuss novels by writers from former British colonies in Africa, South Asia, the Caribbean, and the postcolonial diaspora, with attention to the particularities of their diverse cultures and colonial histories. Our study of the literary texts will incorporate critical and theoretical essays, oral presentations, and brief background lectures. Authors may include Chinua Achebe, Ngugi wa Thiong’o, V.S. Naipaul, Merle Hodge, Anita Desai, Bessie Head, Nadine Gordimer, Paule Marshall, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Salman Rushdie, Earl Lovelace, Arundhati Roy. Serves as prerequisite for FSP in Trinidad. Dist: LIT or INT; WCult: NW. Course Group III. CA tags Genre-narrative, Multicultural and Colonial/Postcolonial Studies. Giri.

59. Critical Issues in Postcolonial Studies

06S: 2A07S: Arrange

Intended for students who have some familiarity with postcolonial literary texts, this course will combine the reading of postcolonial literature with the study and discussion of the major questions confronting the developing field of postcolonial studies. Issues may include: questions of language and definition; the culture and politics of nationalism and transnationalism, race and representation, ethnicity and identity; the local and the global; tradition and modernity; hybridity and authenticity; colonial history, decolonization and neocolonialism; the role and status of postcolonial studies in the academy. Authors may include: Achebe, Appiah, Bhabha, Chatterjee, Coetzee, Fanon, Gilroy, Gordimer, James, JanMohamed, Minh-ha, Mohanty, Ngugi, Radhakrishnan, Rushdie, Said, Spivak, Sunder Rajan. Prerequisite: English 58, Trinidad FSP, or permission of the instructor. Dist: LIT or INT; WCult: NW. Course Group IV. CA tags Multicultural and Colonial/Postcolonial Studies, National Traditions and Countertraditions, Literary Theory and Criticism. Giri.

SECTION III: SPECIAL TOPICS COURSES

60-69 Special Topics in English and American Literature

Note: For the class of 2006 and following, one course in the major must be a Special Topics course (60-69).

These courses are offered periodically with varying content: one or more individual writers, a genre, a period, or an approach to literature not otherwise provided in the English curriculum. Requirements will include papers and, at the discretion of the instructor, examinations. Enrollment is limited to 30. Courses numbered 65-67 require prior work in the period (normally a course in the corresponding course group) or permission of the instructor. Dist: LIT; WCult: Varies.

60. Open Topic

06W: 11

In 06W at 11 (section 1), Native American Oral Traditional Literature (identical to, and described under Native American Studies 34). Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Course Group II, CA tag Multicultural and Colonial/Postcolonial Studies. Runnels.

62. Gender/Literature/Culture

06S: 2A, 2A, 10A

In 06S at 2A (section 2), Immigrant Women Writing in America (Identical to Women’s and Gender Studies 40). In responding to the obstacles facing America’s immigrants, women often assume special burdens and find themselves having to invent new roles. They often also bring powerful bicultural perspectives to a struggle for survival, social and economic justice, and cultural expression. We will read widely in new work on immigrancy, and across genres and national/cultural/religious groups, examining such writers as Danticat, Kincaid, Paley, Hong Kingston, Alvarez, Obejas, Hoffman, Song, Bersenbrugge. Dist: LIT; Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: CI. Course Group III. CA tags Genders and Sexualities, National Traditions and Countertraditions. Zeiger.

In 06S at 2A (section 3), War and Gender (Identical to Women’s and Gender Studies 46). Throughout history, war has been constructed into a powerfully gendered binary. From The Iliad onward, battle is posed as a sacred domain for initiating young men into the masculine gender and the male bond, and the feminine as that which both instigates male-male conflict and that which wars are fought to protect. With a special concentration on U.S. culture of the past century, this course will examine the way our modern myths and narratives instantiate this cultural polarity through film, fiction, non fiction and various media material. Dist: LIT; Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group III. CA tags Genders and Sexualities, Cultural Studies and Popular Culture. Boose.

In 06S at 10A (section 4), Women, “Race,” and Writing: American Drama and Performance (Identical to, and described under Women’s and Gender Studies 40). Dist: LIT; Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: CI, pending faculty approval. Course Group II. CA tags Genders and Sexualities, National Traditions and Countertraditions, Genre-drama. Schweitzer.

63. Topics in Theory and Criticism

06S: 11

In 06S at 11 (section 1), National Allegory: Readings in Postcolonial Literature and Culture. In recent years, the national question has become a focal point of debate in postcolonial literary and cultural studies. Some of the questions that have been raised include: does postcolonial/third world literature represent the nation in ways that they render it distinct from other varieties of writing? Is allegory still a viable mode of literary representation? How does the idea of national allegory relate to those works that seem to privilege mobility, diaspora, and transnationalism? This course seeks to explore these questions in relation to a wide range of texts and authors from South Asia, Africa, the Caribbean, and their Western metropolitan diasporas. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Course Group III, CA tags Literary Theory and Criticism, Multicultural and Colonial/Postcolonial Studies, National Traditions and Countertraditions. Giri.

65. Literature Before the Mid-Seventeenth Century

06S: 10

In 06S at 10 (section 1), Inescapable Romance: From Late Antiquity to Early Modernity. In reading long narrative works (or excerpts) by Heliodrorus, Longus, Ariosto, Tasso, Sidney, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Cervantes, we will pose the question “what is romance?” We will consider the history and some incarnations of the genre from late antiquity through the early modern period. Critical topics to be covered will include those of cultural function, readership, narrative pleasure, desire and subjectivity: they will also include the central tension in romance between “endlessness” and the plotting of closure. Dist: LIT; Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group I. CA tag Genre-narrative. Crewe.

66. Literature from the Mid-Seventeenth Century to the End of the Nineteenth Century

05F: 12

In 05F at 12 (section 2), Reading Between the Color Line: 19th Century Literature of Interracial Identity. We will read narratives of passing and interracial identity with emphasis on the way literary texts construct and complicate notions of race, assimilation, and interracial contact. Likely authors include Stowe, Brown, Harper, Twain, the Crafts, Chesnutt. Graded work will consist of participation, multiple short responses, and one or two formal essays. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: CI. Course Group II. CA tags National Traditions and Counter-Traditions, Multicultural and Colonial/Post Colonial Studies. Chaney.

67. Literature from the Start of the Twentieth Century to the Present

05F: 10A, 2A06W: 2A06S: 10, 12

In 05F at 2A (section 2), Cartographic Encounters and Native Americans (Identical to, and described under, Native American Studies 30). Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Course Group III. CA tags National Traditions and Countertraditions, Multicultural and Colonial/Postcolonial Studies. Goeman.

In 05F at 2A (section 3), Introduction to the Southern Gothic. The South is a region that has always been obsessed with boundaries, whether territorial (the Mason-Dixon line), or those related to gender, social class, and particularly of race. In this course, we will examine the ways in which the grotesques, monsters, freaks and doppelgangers that populate the Southern Gothic are directly linked to the region’s past, particularly to its difficulties in coming to terms with its history of slavery and with interracial sexuality. Authors to be studied include Edgar Allan Poe, George Washington Cable, Charles Chesnutt, William Faulkner, Carson McCullers, Eudora Welty, Flannery O’Connor, and Tennessee Williams. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group III, CA tags Genre-narrative, Cultural Studies and Popular Culture. Castillo.

In 05F at 10A (section 4), A History of Asian America in Novels and Prose (Introduction to Asian American Literature). In this course we will read a survey of literature by various Asian American writers (Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Korean, and South Asian). We will examine and situate this literature within the social contexts of important moments in Asian American history. Requirements: oral presentations, midterm exam, and research paper. Texts include Louis Chu’s Eat a Bowl of Tea, John Okada’s No-No Boy, Jessica Hagedorn’s Dogeaters, Chang-rae Lee’s A Gesture Life, and Jhumpa Lahiri’s The Namesake. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Course Group III. CA tags Genre-narrative, Multicultural and Colonial/Postcolonial Studies, Santa Ana.

In 05F at 2A (section 5), Toni Morrison: Unspeakable Things Unspoken. An examination of the novels and nonfiction writings of Toni Morrison, as well as critical writings about her work. In addition to close readings and discussions of style, we will look at the historical contexts within which the fiction takes place. Papers will include a close-reading midterm essay and a long final research paper. Readings include The Bluest Eye, Sula, Song of Solomon, Tar Baby, Beloved, Jazz, Paradise, Love, and Playing in the Dark, as well as her play Recitif, and critical writings by and about Morrison. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group III. CA tags Genders and Sexualities, National Traditions and Countertraditions. Gerzina.

In 06W at 2A (section 6), Bob Dylan. In this course, we will do close, critical readings of certain Dylan lyrics spanning his entire career, also taking into consideration their social, historical, and biographical circumstances. Oral reports as well as a long final paper will be required. Note: some attention will be given to the performance aspect of Dylan’s songs, but we will not listen to them in class. All of the songs assigned and discussed will be available for your listening in the Paddock Music Library beforehand. Dist: LIT; Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group III. CA tags Genre-poetry, Cultural Studies and Popular Culture. Renza.

In 06S at 10 (section 6), Celtic Myths and Mudbloods. Irish literature in the twentieth century set out to redefine its identity during a period of political upheaval and civil war. Intense struggles arose over the roles of the urban community as in Joyce’s Dubliners and mythic and rural values as in Synge and Yeats. Simultaneously women writers like Edna O’Brien and Eavan Boland questioned the place of women in the myth of national heroism. We will delve into this cultural ferment using the works of these writers as well as contemporary novelists and poets such as Roddy Doyle and Seamus Heaney. The course will have a visual dimension with the movies, Michael Collins, The Crying Game, and Bloody Sunday. Dist: LIT; Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group III. CA tag National Traditions and Countertraditions. Cosgrove.

In 06S at 12 (section 8), The Graphic Novel. A study of the narrative mechanics and cultural work of graphic novels by Eisner, Spiegelman, Moore, Ware, Drechsler, Satrapi, and others. Focus will be placed on their theoretical and formal preoccupations with autobiography, counterculture, parody, science-fiction, and fantasy. In addition to giving a presentation, students will be required to write two formal essays and several short responses. Dist: LIT; Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group III. CA tags Genre-narrative, Cultural Studies and Popular Culture. Chaney.

SECTION IV: ADVANCED SEMINARS

Seminars are designed as small courses, limited to twelve students, primarily seniors; qualified juniors may enroll. These courses emphasize discussion, and allow the student to develop his or her thinking about a subject throughout the term. Though assignments vary according to the nature of the material being studied, seminars usually involve class presentations and a term paper. They fulfill the “Culminating Experience” requirement. Prerequisite: at least four completed major courses, of which one must be in the same course group as the seminar. Students who successfully complete a seminar may sometimes be allowed to follow it with a one-term Honors project (see the section on Honors, above). Dist: LIT; WCult: Varies

70. Literature Before the Mid-Seventeenth Century

06W: 2A

In 06W at 2A (section 1), Medieval Animals. From bestiary collections to theological tracts, from scholastic debates between birds to trickster heroes such as Reynard the fox, medieval literature is full of meaningful animals. This course will examine the significance of a variety of medieval “animal” texts, ranging from The Book of Beasts and the Physiologus to Marie de France’s Fables and Chaucer’s The Nun’s Priest’s Tale. We will also consider recent theoretical studies of the “animal” in culture as well as corollary American critters such as Coyote and the Signifying Monkey. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group I. CA tags Genders and Sexualities, Cultural Studies and Popular Culture. Travis.

In 06W at 2A (section 2), Shakespeare on Film. Using a software program that allows scenes to be excerpted from DVDs, the course will examine the DVDs available for such plays as The Merchant of Venice, Hamlet, Othello, The Taming of the Shrew, Romeo and Juliet, and Henry V. We will use film production of the plays as a way of both examining the filmed plays and simultaneously proposing new narratives that might arise from juxtaposing them. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group I. CA tags Genre-drama, Cultural Studies and Popular Studies. Boose.

71. Literature from the Mid-Seventeenth Century to the End of the Nineteenth Century

05F: 1006W: 10A06S: 12

In 05F at 10 (section 1), Not Your Father’s Walt Whitman. A close study of Whitman’s texts (poetry and prose), contexts (literary and historical), and significance (cultural and critical). This course will span Whitman’s literary career and pay particular attention to his changing sense of self and nation. We will examine the revisions of Leaves of Grass between the first edition of 1855 and the death-bed edition of 1891-92 to learn how Whitman reconceptualized his project and his own role. We will consider his self-stylization as the American poet in light of the changing definitions that he attached to “America” as he repeatedly reinvented himself from the newspaperman of the 1840’s to the ‘Good Gray Poet” of the 1880’s. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group II. CA tag Genre-poetry. Cook.

In 06W at 10A (section 2), Edgar Allen Poe. In this seminar, we will examine and discuss Poe’s poetry, tales, and criticism, along with past and present critical reception of this work. Assignments will include class reports and a substantial final essay. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group II, CA tag National Traditions and Countertraditions. Renza.

In 06S at 12 (section 3), Alexander Pope. Immerse yourself in the works, biography, and critical responses to Alexander Pope, the eighteenth-century satirist whose waspish couplets run the gamut from scatology to eschatology. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group II, CA tag Genre-poetry. Cosgrove.

72. Literature from the Start of the Twentieth Century to the Present

05F: 3A, 2A, 1006W: 2A06S: 10A, 2A, 10A

In 05F at 3A (section 1), The Poetry of Wallace Stevens. The course will mostly consist of reading and discussing Stevens’ collected poems and some prose. We will also read critical interpretations of his works. Students will give oral class reports and write two essays on approved topics. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group III, CA tag Genre-poetry. Renza.

In 05F at 2A (section 2), American Writers Between the World Wars. This course will examine the work of American authors writing between the end of World War I and the beginning of World War II. We will consider such topics as: “post-war” and “pre-war” writing, interwar nativism, black internationalism, and the afterlife of artistic modernism. The course will combine a strong historical focus with close readings of texts by Fitzgerald, Dos Passos, Baldwin, Hemingway, Cather, Stein, and Dorothy West. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group III, CA tag National Traditions and Countertraditions. Will.

In 05F at 10 (section 3), Jews in American Culture and Theory: The New York Intellectuals (Identical to and described under Jewish Studies 30). Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group III, CA tags National Traditions and Countertraditions, Cultural Studies and Popular Culture. Milich.

In 06W at 2A (section 5), Transnationalism in Asian American Literature and Cultural Criticism. Drawing on contemporary debates about transnationalism in Asian American cultural criticism, this course will examine narratives and films by Asian Americans that feature the experience of crossing national borders and living in global America. Requirements: oral presentations, analytical essay, and research paper. Texts include Jhumpa Lahiri’s Interpreter of Maladies, Andrew Pham’s Catfish and Mandala, Jessica Hagedorn’s Dream Jungle, David Mura’s Turning Japanese, Chang-rae Lee’s A Gesture Life, and the films Fire and First Person Plural. Dist: LIT. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: CI. Course Group III, CA tags Cultural Studies and Popular Culture, Multicultural and Colonial / Postcolonial Studies. Santa Ana.

In 06S at 10A (section 6), Asian American Poetry. How do Asian Americans articulate the world? This course traces the development of their poetry from early anonymous efforts to contemporary experiments. Among the issues covered are: dominant modes, forms and thematics; evolving traditions and intertextualities; activist and post-activist aesthetics; cultural nationalisms; global and diasporic perspectives. Poets studied may include: Meena Alexander, Agha Shahid Ali, Linh Dinh, Jessica Hagedorn, Garrett Hongo, Lawson Inada, Li-Young Lee, Janice Mirikitani, Yone Noguchi and Cathy Song. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: CI. Course Group III, CA tags Genre-poetry, Multicultural and Colonial/Postcolonial Studies. Chin.

In 06S at 2A (section 7), Black British Literature. Black people have been present in Britain since the Roman occupation, and have been published authors there since the eighteenth century. The course begins with early narratives and letters and moves into the burgeoning canon of modern fiction and poetry. In all of these works, the emphasis is on crafting a literary voice, formation of political power, immigration, and realities of multicultural Britain as depicted in literature, criticism and film. Authors may include Bernadine Evaristo, S.I. Martin, Paul Gilroy, Sam Selvon, Ifeona Fulani, Andrea Levy, Caryl Phillips and Alex Wheatle. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: CI. Course Group III, CA tags National Traditions and Countertraditions, Multicultural and Colonial/Postcolonial Studies. Gerzina.

In 06S at 10A (section 8), Virginia Woolf: Theory and Practice. In this course we will read a number of works by Virginia Woolf, including experimental short stories, essays about language and literature, polemical writings, and novels. We will also read essays written in the early 20th century that are associated with the Modernist movement, as well as critical and theoretical essays about Woolf’s work. Prerequisites include at least one course on 20th century fiction and, preferably, a course on literary theory. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group III, CA tags Genre-narrative. Silver.

74. Open Topic

Not offered in 2005-2006, may be offered in 2006-2007

75. Seminar in Criticism and Theory

Not offered in 2005-2006, may be offered in 2006-2007

SECTION V: CREATIVE WRITING

80. Creative Writing

All terms: Arrange

This course offers a workshop in fiction and poetry. Seminar-sized classes meet twice a week plus individual conferences. Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors, and to first-year students who have completed their seminar. English 80 is the prerequisite to all other Creative Writing courses. It does not carry major or minor credit. Dist: ART. Hebert, Huntington, Mathis, Dimmick, Lenhart.

Students who wish to enroll in an intermediate Creative Writing Course must pick up the appropriate “How to Apply...” form from the English Department and answer all the questions asked in a cover letter. They should also submit a five-eight page writing sample, as stated in each of the course descriptions below. This must be delivered to the administrative assistant of the English Department by the last day of the term preceding the term for which they wish to enroll. The student should then register for three other courses, not including the Creative Writing course. Students accepted into Creative Writing 81, 82 and 83 will be notified before the first day of class. To secure their spot in the class, the student must be present at the first meeting. At that time students will be given a permission card and can then drop one of their other courses and enroll for the Creative Writing course.

81. Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry

06S, 06X, 07S: Arrange

Continued work in the writing of poetry, focusing on the development of craft, image, and voice, as well as the process of revision. The class proceeds by means of group workshops on student writing, individual conferences with the instructor, and analysis of poems by contemporary writers.

Prerequisite: English 80 and permission of the instructor. Please pick up the “How To Apply To English 81, 82 or 83” form from the English Department and answer all of the questions asked in a cover letter. Students should submit a five-eight page writing sample of their poetry to the administrative assistant of the English Department by the last day of the term preceding the term in which they wish to enroll. Dist: ART. Mathis, Huntington.

82. Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction

06W, 06S, 07W, 07S: Arrange

Continued work in the writing of fiction, focusing on short stories, although students may experiment with the novel. The class proceeds by means of group workshops on student writing, individual conferences with the instructor, and analysis of short stories by contemporary writers. Constant revision is required.

Prerequisite: English 80 and permission of the instructor. Please pick up the “How To Apply To English 81, 82 or 83” form from the English Department and answer all of the questions asked in a cover letter. Students should submit a five-eight page writing sample of their fiction to the administrative assistant of the English Department by the last day of the term preceding the term in which they wish to enroll. Dist: ART. Hebert, Dimmick.

83. Advanced Creative Writing: Literary Non-Fiction

Not offered in 2005-2006, may be offered in 2006-2007

This course offers students training in the writing of literary nonfiction. The class proceeds by means of group workshops on student writing, individual conferences with the instructor, and analysis of work by contemporary writers.

Prerequisite: English 80 and permission of the instructor. Please pick up the “How To Apply To English 81, 82 or 83” form from the English Department and answer all of the questions asked in a cover letter. Students should submit a five-eight page writing sample of their non-fiction to the administrative assistant of the English Department by the last day of the term preceding the term in which they wish to enroll. Dist: ART.

85. Senior Workshop in Poetry and Prose Fiction

05F, 06F: Arrange

This course is to be taken by Creative Writing majors in the fall of their senior year. Each student will undertake a manuscript of poems, short fiction, or literary non-fiction. While all Creative Writing majors are guaranteed a spot in English 85, they must nonetheless submit a five-to-eight page writing sample to the administrative assistant of the English Department by the last day of the spring term preceding their senior year. Please also pick up the “How To Apply To English 85” form from the English Department and answer all of the questions asked in a cover letter.

Prerequisite: English 80 and 81, 82, or 83. Students who are not Creative Writing majors may be admitted by permission of the Creative Writing staff. Dist: ART. Dimmick, Hebert, Huntington.

SECTION VI: FOREIGN

STUDY COURSES

90. English Study Abroad I

Major credit for this course is awarded to students who satisfactorily complete a course of study elected as part of one of the Department’s three Foreign Study Programs (FSPs). On the Glasgow FSP, this will be a course of study in literature at the University of Glasgow. On the Trinidad FSP, this will be a course of study in literature at the University of the West Indies. On the Dublin FSP, this will be a course of study in the English Department at Trinity College Dublin (TCD). Of the three courses at TCD at least one must be in Irish literature. Students are also required to do an independent study project on some aspect of Irish literature or culture, culminating in a long essay; the grade for the independent study is factored into the grade for the Irish literature course.

Glasgow and Dublin Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Trinidad Dist: LIT; WCult: NW.

91. English Study Abroad II

Major credit for this course is awarded to students who satisfactorily complete a course of study elected as part of one of the Department’s three Foreign Study Programs (FSPs). On the Glasgow FSP, this will be a course of study in literature at the University of Glasgow. On the Trinidad FSP, this will be a course of study in literature at the University of the West Indies. On the Dublin FSP, this will be a course of study in the English Department at Trinity College Dublin (TCD). Of the three courses at TCD at least one must be in Irish literature. Students are also required to do an independent study project on some aspect of Irish literature or culture, culminating in a long essay; the grade for the independent study is factored into the grade for the Irish literature course.

Glasgow and Dublin Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Trinidad Dist: LIT; WCult: NW.

92. English Study Abroad III

One college credit (not major or minor credit) for this course is awarded to students who satisfactorily complete a course of study elected as part of one of the Department’s three Foreign Study Programs (FSPs). On the Glasgow FSP, this will be a non-preprofessional course of study of any kind offered at the University of Glasgow. On the Trinidad FSP, this will be a course of study in West Indian history and culture. On the Dublin FSP, this will be a course of study in the English Department at Trinity College Dublin (TCD). Of the three courses at TCD at least one must be in Irish literature. Students are also required to do an independent study project on some aspect of Irish literature or culture, culminating in a long essay; the grade for the independent study is factored into the grade for the Irish literature course.

Glasgow Dist: Varies; Trinidad Dist: INT or SOC; Dublin Dist: LIT.

SECTION VII: INDEPENDENT STUDY AND HONORS

96. Reading Course

All terms: Arrange

A tutorial course to be designed by the student with the assistance of a member of the English Department willing to supervise it. This course is available, as an occasional privilege, to upperclassmen who have demonstrated their ability to do independent work. During the term prior to taking the course, applicants must consult Professor Will to make arrangements for approval of the project.

(Note: English 96 does not normally count towards the English major or minor, though in special circumstances the C.D.C. may approve occasional exceptions to that rule. Students seeking such an exception are asked to petition the C.D.C. before taking English 96. English 96 may not be used to satisfy course group requirements.)

97. Creative Writing Project

All terms: Arrange

A tutorial course to be designed by the student with the assistance of a member of the Creative Writing Faculty willing to supervise it. This course is intended for the purpose of producing a significant manuscript of fiction, nonfiction or poetry. It carries major credit only for creative writing majors. Creative Writing majors must request permission to undertake English 97 (one term) during fall of senior year when they are enrolled in English 85. Decisions regarding admission to English 97 will not be made before fall term of senior year.

Prerequisite: English 85, and permission of the Director of Creative Writing.

98. Honors Course

All terms: Arrange

Independent study under the direction of a faculty adviser. Honors majors will elect this course in each term in which they are pursuing Honors projects. For more information, see “English Honors Program,” above, and consult the “Guide to Honors” booklet available in the English Department.