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Classics

CLASSICAL STUDIES; GREEK; LATIN

Chair: Jeremy B. Rutter

Professors E. M. Bradley, J. B. Rutter, J. H. Tatum, R. B. Ulrich; Associate Professors M. R. Graver, R. L. Stewart, L. J. Whaley, M. Williamson; Assistant Professors P. C. Christesen, H. P. Tell; Lecturer A. D. Loud.

Additional information regarding the Classics Department can be found at the World Wide Web location http://www.dartmouth.edu/~classics/

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR IN CLASSICAL LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

1. Any six language courses in Greek and/or Latin numbered 10 or higher.

2. Two courses distributed as follows: one course selected from Classical Studies 2-5; one course selected from Classical Studies 14-26.

3. Two additional courses selected from: any Classical Studies numbered 2 or higher; any course in Greek or Latin numbered 10 or higher; Art History 21, 22, 25, Comparative Literature 10, Philosophy 11.

4. Completion of Culminating Experience Requirement (description following all major and minor requirement listings).

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MODIFIED MAJOR IN CLASSICAL LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

1. Any five courses in Greek and/or Latin numbered 10 or higher.

2. Completion of Culminating Experience Requirement (description following all major and minor requirement listings).

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR IN CLASSICAL LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

1. Any four courses in Greek and/or Latin numbered 10 or higher.

2. One course selected from: Classical Studies 2-5, 29-31; any course in Greek or Latin numbered 10 or higher; Comparative Literature 10, Philosophy 11.

3. One course in ancient history or archaeology selected from Classical Studies 14-26.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR IN ANCIENT HISTORY

Prerequisite: Greek 10 or Latin 10, or equivalent.

Requirements:

1. Classical Studies 14 and 17.

2. Three additional courses in ancient history selected from: Classical Studies 11, 15, 18, 29 (if written on an historical topic); and 31.

3. Studies 19.

4. Two Greek or Latin courses numbered 20 or above.

5. Two additional courses selected from: courses in Ancient History listed under (2) above; courses in Classical Archaeology (Classical Studies 6, 20-26); courses in Greek or Latin numbered 20 or higher; Classical Studies 3 and Classical Studies 12.

6. Completion of Culminating Experience Requirement (description following all major and minor requirement listings).

One related course from outside the Classics Department may, with departmental approval, serve in partial satisfaction of this requirement (for example, a thematically appropriate offering of History 95).

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR IN ANCIENT HISTORY

1. Four courses in ancient history selected from Classical Studies 11, 14, 15, 17-19.

2. Two courses in Classical archaeology selected from Classical Studies 6, 20-26.

3. One additional course selected from: ancient history (listed in 1 above); Classical archaeology (listed in 2 above); courses in Greek and Latin numbered 10 or higher; Classical Studies 2-5 or Classical Studies 12.

Participation in either of the Classics’ Department’s Foreign Study Programs will meet the requirements for two of the above seven courses, one in archaeology and one in ancient history (Classical Studies 30 and 31 respectively).

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR IN CLASSICAL ARCHAEOLOGY

Prerequisite: Classical Studies 6, Greek or Latin 3, or equivalent.

Requirements:

1. One course in ancient history selected from Classical Studies 14, 15, 17 or 18.

2. Three courses in Classical Archaeology selected from Classical Studies 20-26.

3. Two courses from the Greek or Roman Foreign Study Programs (Classical Studies 29, 30, 31).

4. Two courses in ancient Greek or Latin numbered 10 or higher.

5. Two additional courses selected from: all remaining Classical Studies offerings; courses in Greek or Latin numbered 10 or higher; Art History 20, 21, 22, or 25.

6. Completion of Culminating Experience Requirement (description following all major and minor requirement listings).

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MODIFIED MAJOR IN CLASSICAL ARCHAEOLOGY

Prerequisite: Greek or Latin 10, or equivalent.

Requirements:

1. Four courses selected from Classical Studies 20-26.

2. One course in ancient history selected from Classical Studies 14, 15, 17, or 18.

3. Seminar: Classical Studies 29 or 87.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR IN CLASSICAL ARCHAEOLOGY

Prerequisite: Classical Studies 6.

Requirements:

1. Two courses in ancient history selected from Classical Studies 11, 14, 15, 17, 18.

2. Four courses in Classical archaeology: two in Greek archaeology (Classical Studies 20-23) and two in Roman archaeology (Classical Studies 24-26).

Participation in either of the Department’s two Foreign Study Programs will meet the requirements for two of the above six courses, one in archaeology and one in history (Classical Studies 30 and 31 respectively).

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR IN CLASSICAL STUDIES

Prerequisite: Two courses selected from Classical Studies 1, 4 and 6.

Requirements:

1. One course in ancient history selected from Classical Studies 14, 15, 17 and 18.

2. Two courses in Classical Archaeology selected from Classical Studies 20 - 26.

3. Three courses in classical literature in translation and classical civilization selected from Classical Studies 2 - 5, 10, 11 and 12, exclusive of the course selected as a prerequisite.

4. Two additional courses selected from: all remaining Classical Studies offerings, courses in Greek or Latin numbered 10 or higher.

5. Completion of Culminating Experience Requirement (description following all major and minor requirement listings).

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR IN CLASSICAL STUDIES

Prerequisite: One course selected from Classical Studies 1-5.

Requirements:

1. Two courses in ancient history selected from Classical Studies 11, 14, 15, 17, 18 and 19.

2. Two courses in classical archaeology: one in Greek archaeology (Classical Studies 20-23) and one in Roman archaeology (Classical Studies 24-26).

3. Two courses in classical literature, mythology, and religion selected from: Classical Studies 1-4, 10 and 12, exclusive of the course selected as a prerequisite.

Participation in either of the Department’s two Foreign Study Programs will meet the requirements for two of the above six courses, one in archaeology and one in history (Classical Studies 30 and 31 respectively).

CULMINATING EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENT

In order to complete the Culminating Experience Requirement, students must enroll in a Honors Project (or) Participate in both Foreign Study Programs (Greece and Rome) (or) Enroll during their Senior year in one additional course selected from offerings in Classical Studies 2 or higher, Greek or Latin above the level of 10, and Comparative Literature 19 (translations are to be in Greek or Latin) and complete a research paper/project in conjunction with that course. The research paper/project may be either part of, or an addition to, the work regularly required for the course and is subject to department approval.

REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL MODIFIED MAJOR PROGRAMS

Students wishing to design a Modified Major in Classical Languages and Literatures, Classical Archaeology, or Classical Studies must submit a written rationale demonstrating the intellectual coherence of their proposed program. The complete proposal must be formally approved by the Department of Classics. The program must include at least five courses offered by other departments and programs in addition to the prerequisites and major courses in Classics. One of these courses in other departments may be identified as prerequisite.

STUDY PROGRAMS ABROAD

The Department of Classics sponsors two foreign study programs, one during the fall (odd numbered years) and one during the spring term (odd numbered years), each directed by a member of the faculty of the Department of Classics. Participation in either of the Department’s two Foreign Study Programs will meet major requirements, one in archaeology and one in history (Classical Studies 30 and 31 respectively).

The Greek Program

This program, while loosely based in Athens, consists for the most part of extensive field trips under the direction of a member of the Department of Classics to various parts of the ancient Greek world, including Crete, western Turkey, and the Aegean islands. The itinerary varies from offering to offering depending upon the interests of the students and the accompanying Dartmouth faculty member. It is designed for qualified students interested in Greek archaeology, art, history, and literature. Archaeologists resident in Greece are invited to provide special tours and offer lectures about important sites or museum collections that are especially well known to them. A two-week period is set aside for independent travel and research related to each student’s independent study project.

The Roman Program

By means of extensive field trips throughout the Italian peninsula (e.g., Latium, Tuscany, Campania, Umbria) students engage in a systematic investigation of the sites, monuments, and artifacts of the Etruscan, Roman, and palaeo-Christian cultures of Italy under the direction of Dartmouth faculty. The aim of the program is to develop a coherent understanding of the processes of origin and growth, conflict and change in ancient Italy. To this end, the monuments of post-Classical Italy are also examined whenever possible, so that students may begin to understand the profound and continuing influence of ancient Italic cultures upon the development of western Europe.

The curriculum embraces architecture, the visual arts and plastic arts, history, religion, and the basic techniques of archaeological analysis. Students learn to see and understand the Roman world in its own context through informal lectures and discussion in situ, under the open sky. The academic requirements consist of short weekly papers, oral reports, and an independent project or thesis to be undertaken during the last two weeks of the program when students are free to travel and do research for their theses.

SENIOR HONORS PROGRAM

Students eligible for the honors program in Classical Languages and Literatures, Ancient History, Classical Archaeology, or Classical Studies may elect one of three projects for their senior year: a thesis, a comprehensive examination, or an honors essay and a written examination on connected subjects. They should apply to the Chair of the Department no later than the end of the spring term of their junior year for admission to the program.

Only those students who satisfactorily complete an honors program with a B+ average or better will earn Honors in their major or, in appropriate cases, High Honors. High Honors will be granted only by vote of the Department on the basis of outstanding independent work.

Students in the honors program are responsible for selecting their principal advisers from among the departmental faculty; a second reader will be assigned to each student by the Department. The principal adviser will approve a reading list for the student and check his or her progress at regular intervals during the year in order to assure adequate progress towards completion of the honors program on schedule.

TRANSFER CREDIT FOR MAJORS

Transfer credit in Classical Studies, Greek and Latin is granted by prior arrangement to majors in the Department of Classics. Exceptions to this policy can be made only by petition to the Department.

CLASSICAL STUDIES

1. Antiquity Today: An Introduction to Classical Studies

06W, 07W: 11

Which ancient faces and personalities come alive for us when we look back at Greek and Roman antiquity? How were the Greeks and Romans like us, and how different? How and why does their world - and what we have inherited from their world - intrigue, repel, awe, amuse, or disturb us, and how much is that to do with our own preoccupations? Taking as its starting point the interface between Classical antiquity and the twenty-first century, this course explores a selection of topics that will introduce you to the different areas and disciplines that make up Classics in the new millennium.

Open to all classes. Dist: LIT or INT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: CI. Christesen.

2. The Tragedy and Comedy of Greece and Rome

06S, 07S: 12

The course studies in translation selected works of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides and Seneca (tragedy), Aristophanes and Plautus (comedy), and some of their central themes and questions: law, community, revenge, passion, justice, for example. We will approach them both as texts and as scripts/librettos, considering their relationship to other types of performance (ritual, rhetoric, music, dance) and genres (history, philosophy) as well as to theatrical space. There will be practical workshop opportunities for those interested.

Open to all classes. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Williamson.

3. Reason and the Human Good: Socrates to Epictetus

07W: 2

An introduction to philosophical thought in antiquity, especially that of Socrates, Epicurus, and the Stoics. We will concentrate especially on ethical questions; e.g. what kind of life is best for humans to pursue, how thoughtful persons should weigh the potentially competing claims of reason, pleasure, and emotion - and on how intellectual activity was perceived at Athens and at Rome. Readings include Aristophanes’ Clouds, Plato’s Apology and Meno, and selected writings on Epicurus, Cicero, Seneca, and Epictetus.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: W. Graver.

4. Classical Mythology

06X: 12

An introduction to Greek myths and the way in which their use in literature developed, from the use of myths as religious story to the utilization of myth in drama and its exploitation in poetry.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV. WCult: CI. Tatum.

5. The Heroic Vision: Epics of Greece and Rome

05F, 06F: 2

Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, Vergil’s Aeneid, and Ovid’s Metamorphoses are among the best known and most influential works to survive from the ancient world. Yet as products of societies vastly different from our own, they remain challengingly unfamiliar. This course offers the chance to study these four epics in their entirety, together with the Argonautica of Apollonius of Rhodes and extensive selections from Lucretius’ De Rerum Natura. Emphasis will be placed on the historical and cultural contexts in which the poems were produced and on how each poet uses the works of his predecessors to define his own place in the epic tradition.

Open to all classes. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Bradley.

6. Introduction to Classical Archaeology

05F, 06F: 11

The aim of the course is to familiarize students with the basic methods and principles of Classical archaeology through a survey of the principal types of sites and artifacts characteristic of Greco-Roman antiquity. Students will gain a good overview of the approaches useful in the interpretation of a wide variety of material evidence as well as of problems inherent in such evidence. At the same time, through the study of a number of major sites in roughly chronological sequence, students will acquire an appreciation of the development of material culture in the Mediterranean world from prehistory to the collapse of the Roman Empire. The course thus serves both as an introduction to Greek and Roman civilization and to the particular goals of the discipline of archaeology.

Open to all classes. Dist: INT or ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Rutter.

7. First-Year Seminars in Classical Studies

Consult special listings

10. Topics in Greek and Latin Literature

Not offered in the period from 05F through 07S

11. Topics in Greek and Roman Social and Economic History

05F: 1106W: 10 06F: 1207S: 12

Open to all classes.

In 05F, Ancient Greek Athletics. Athletics played a pivotal role in the ancient Greek world. Because of the close links between athletic activity and, among other things, military service, citizenship and social status, an examination of the history of athletics in ancient Greece offers us insight not just into the sort of games Greeks played but also into some of the basic forces shaping society. This course will focus on an examination of the extant evidence from ancient literary and artistic sources as well as relevant modern archaeological work. Assigned readings and the material covered in lecture and discussion will be designed to explore both sport as sport and sport’s place in contemporary society. Christesen. Dist: SOC. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W.

In 06W, Slaves, Wives and Concubines: Did Roman Women Have a History? (Identical to Women's and Gender Studies 46.1). In this course we explore the lives of Roman women first in terms of the larger institutional frameworks that structured and gave meaning to women’s lives, either by inclusion (family, marriage) or exclusion (law, politics). From this basis we investigate the characterization and self-representation of women in literary texts: women as mothers and wives, women as political actors, women as priests and ritual participants. Selected readings of Roman literary and legal sources will be supplemented by evidence from Roman inscriptions, domestic architecture, sculpture, and coinage. Readings in secondary literature will familiarize students with modes of historical argument and historiography. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Stewart.

In 06F, Sex, Celibacy and the Problem of Purity: Asceticism and the Human Body in Late Antiquity (Identical to Religion 31 and Women’s and Gender Studies 35 in 06F). This course examines a crucial period in the history of Christianity - Late Antiquity. Between the years 300 and 500, Christianity became the official religion of the Roman Empire, established standards of doctrine and ecclesiastical organization, and developed the attitudes towards the body, sexuality and gender which informed Christian teaching for centuries to come. In this class we will ask: why did virginity become such an important aspect of Christian religiosity? What effect did Roman concepts of gender and sexuality have on Christian understanding of the relationship between men and women? What did martyrs, gladiators and monks have in common.

Open to all students. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: W. MacEvitt.

In 07S, Law and Society in the Ancient World. This course compares the legal systems of Classical Athens and ancient Rome. Topics include the purpose and the social significance of published law, the relation between substantive law and judicial procedure, the relation between law and courtroom argument, and the categories and principles of Roman legal thinking. Readings include Greek and Roman legal codes (i.e. Drakon’s law on homicide, the Twelve Tables), courtroom speeches (Demosthenes, Lysias, Antiphon, Cicero), contemporary critiques of the Judicial system (Aristophanes’ Wasps) and legal opinions of the Roman jurists. Dist: SOC. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Stewart.

14. Greek History: Archaic and Classical Greece (Identical to History 94.3)

05F, 06F: 12

This course surveys the major events in the history of ancient Greece from 1600 to 338 BCE. During this period, the Greeks formed individual communities and developed political structures that satisfied particular communal definitions of liberty, spread their culture throughout the Mediterranean, invented democracy and enshrined in their art, literature, and political systems the beginnings of humanism. During the same period, democratic Athens became an imperialist power and a slave society and, unlike other Greeks, kept wives and daughters closeted. This course considers the peculiarities and genius of these Greeks.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Christesen.

17. Roman History: The Republic (Identical to History 94.5)

07W: 12

This course surveys the history of the Roman people from 753 (traditional date of the founding of Rome) to 44 B.C. (the assassination of Julius Caesar). Topics include the development of Roman law, the conquest of all lands bordering on the Mediterranean, and the civil wars that destroyed Republican government. Particular emphasis is placed on the Roman political community: the political, religious and social factors that influenced the definition of the Roman aristocracy in the fourth century, the institutions that maintained the ascendancy of the elite, the military and political values inherent in the citizenship, the social and political mechanisms that militated against civil dissent, and the role of political values in the eventual destruction of Republican government from within.

May be taken in partial fulfillment of the major in History. Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Stewart.

18. History of the Roman Empire: Roman Principate to Christian Empire (Identical to History 94.6)

06W: 12

This course surveys the history of Rome (city and empire) from the victory of Octavian-Augustus at Actium in 31 B.C. to the success of Constantine at the Milvian Bridge in 312. Topics include the Roman conception of empire and the successive strategies of defending it, political leadership and the cult of personality, the theory and reality of the Roman citizenship (e.g., service in the Roman army), imperial policies on urban development and the social and political function of the cities, the development of alternative sources of political power and social prestige, and the conflicting political identities of Romans and Christians and the political consequences of a religious conversion.

May be taken in partial fulfillment of the major in History. Open to all classes. Dist: INT or SOC. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Stewart.

19. Methods and Theory in Ancient History (Identical to History 94.7)

06S: 10A

This course is designed to introduce the student to the various types of documentary evidence available to the ancient historian and to the various perspectives for framing and answering historical questions. We consider the interpretive methodologies for each type of document (coin, inscription, papyrus) as well as the particular historical context in which these documents were produced. Topics include the function of coinage and economic thinking in the ancient world and the political significance of the publication of law. The final weeks of the term allow for in-depth consideration of a specific problem in ancient history.

May be taken in partial fulfillment of the major in History. Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Stewart.

20. Greek Prehistoric Archaeology: The Emergence of Civilization in the Aegean

06W: 11

This course traces the cultural evolution of humanity in the Aegean basin from the era of hunting and gathering (Palaeolithic-Mesolithic) through the early village farming stage (Neolithic) and the formative period of Aegean civilization (Early Bronze Age) into the age of the great palatial cultures of Minoan Crete and Mycenaean Greece. The emphasis in the early part of the course will be on the different economic bases of early life in the Aegean and on regional variation within it. In the latter half of the course, study of the palaces, fortified citadels, and royal tombs at such sites as Knossos, Mycenae, Tiryns, and Troy will lead to discussions of the Greek myths about Atlantis, King Minos’ sea empire, and the Trojan War, and their basis in historical fact.

May be taken in partial fulfillment of the major in Art History. Open to all classes. Dist: SOC. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Rutter.

21. From Disaster to Triumph: Greek Archaeology from the Destruction of Mycenae to the Persian Wars

06S: 11

This course examines in detail through archaeology the cultural process whereby Greece evolved from a scattered group of isolated and backward villages in the Dark Ages (ca. 1100-750 B.C.) to a series of independent, often cosmopolitan city-states united against the threat of Xerxes’ invasion of Greece in 480 B.C. Where did the Greeks acquire the concept of monumental temple architecture and why did they choose to build temples in only two or three different architectural styles? Where did the Greeks learn to write in an alphabetic script and what did they first write down? Who taught the Greeks the art of sculpture and why did they begin by carving what they did? When and why did the Greeks begin to portray their myths in art?

May be taken in partial fulfillment of the major in Art History. Open to all classes. Dist: SOC. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Rutter.

22. Greek Classical Archaeology: City-States and Panhellenic Sanctuaries

07W: 10

From the allied Greeks’ expulsion of Persian invaders through their great victories at Plataea and Mykale in 479 B.C. to their catastrophic defeat by Philip, Alexander, and the Macedonians at Chaeronea in 338 B.C., the history of Greek culture is that of dozens of individual city-states in constant competition for hegemony in a wide variety of different arenas, from battlefield to stadium to pan-Hellenic sanctuary. In this course, particular attention is paid to the material cultural achievements of the richest and artistically most influential of these poleis, the city of Athens, when that city developed the western world’s first democracy, built the Parthenon, and played host to the schools established by Plato and Aristotle.

May be taken in partial fulfillment of the major in Art History. Open to all classes. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Rutter.

24. Etruscan and Early Roman Archaeology: The Rise of Rome

06F: 2A

This course begins with the archaeology of Late Neolithic and Iron Age Italy, then focuses upon the Etruscans, early Latium and the development of Republican Rome and her colonies, concluding with the death of Caesar in 44 B.C. In addition to a chronological development of the material culture of Italy, we will explore at least two important cultural topics: 1) Etruscan religion and its influence on the Roman sacro-political system; 2) the machinery of Roman government as expressed in the spaces in Rome (and other sites) that played host to political ritual: the Arx, the Forum, the Comitium, the Curia, the Tribunal and the Basilica.

May be taken in partial fulfillment of the major in Art History. Open to all classes. Dist: SOC. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Ulrich.

25. Early Roman Imperial Archaeology: The First Emperors

07S: 11

Through archaeological sites and related finds, this course examines the Roman empire as it was transformed under the rule of the emperors. We will begin with a close look at the first emperor, Augustus, then continue with an examination of the reigns of the Julio-Claudians, Flavians, and Trajan. We focus on how ancient Italic traditions were transformed to suit the needs of the Imperial government (for example, the adaptation of the Republican, Hellenized Domus to the Imperial Palatium). The most dramatic change in religious practice is the development of the Imperial cult. Site analysis will stress the need for an imperial idiom, the accommodation of urban masses and the promotion of a sense of a shared cultural experience. The course will also examine the technological developments that led to the ‘architectural revolution.’

May be taken in partial fulfillment of the major in Art History. Open to all classes. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Ulrich.

26. Later Roman Imperial Archaeology: The Golden Age and Beyond

06W: 12

This course surveys Roman archaeology from Hadrian to Constantine. Emphasis is placed upon the Antonine and Severan emperors, then shifts rapidly over most of the mid-third century to focus on Diocletian and the tetrarchy, Constantine and the move of the capital to Constantinople. The course ends with a look at the great church of Hagia Sophia, and consideration of the debt of early Christianity to pagan religious traditions. A major component of the course is the study of the Romanization of the provinces, and, more specifically, the complex process of cultural hybridization (imported Roman traditions melding with local practices). Such sites as Baalbek, Petra, Dura-Europos, Palmyra, Roman Egypt, Tripolitania, Tunisia and Algeria, Constantinian Jerusalem, Trier, Spalato, etc., may be included.

May be taken in partial fulfillment of the major in Art History. Open to all classes. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Ulrich.

29. Independent Study Project

05F: D.F.S.P. (Italy)07S: D.F.S.P. (Greece)

The independent study project to be completed by a student while a member of the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program in Greece or Italy.

Prerequisite: membership in the Foreign Study Program. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W.

30. Classical Art and Archaeology: Study Abroad

05F: D.F.S.P. (Italy)07S: D.F.S.P. (Greece)

Credit for this course is awarded to students who have successfully completed the work of the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program in Greece or Italy. May be taken in partial fulfillment of the major in Art.

Prerequisite: membership in the Foreign Study Program. Dist: ART. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W.

31. Ancient Literature and History: Study Abroad

05F: D.F.S.P. (Italy)07S: D.F.S.P. (Greece)

Credit for this course is awarded to students who have successfully completed the work of the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program in Greece or Italy.

Prerequisite: membership in the Foreign Study Program. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W.

85. Independent Reading and Research

All terms: Arrange

87. Thesis

All terms: Arrange

Independent research and writing under supervision of a member of the Classics faculty. Open to honors students in their senior year and to other qualified students by consent of the Department.

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

LATIN

1. Introductory Latin

05F, 06W: 906F: 9, 207W: 9

Introduction to Latin grammar, vocabulary, and syntax through prose readings of gradually increasing difficulty. Never serves in partial satisfaction of the Distributive Requirement. The staff.

3. Intermediate Latin

06W, 06S: 907W: 9, 207S: 9

Continued study of Latin grammar, vocabulary, and syntax with reading of selected literary texts. Completion of Latin 3 satisfies the College language requirement. Never serves in partial satisfaction of the Distributive Requirement.

Prerequisite: Latin 1, or equivalent. The staff.

10. Readings in Latin Prose and Poetry

05F, 06S: 906F: 207S: 9

Readings in Latin prose and poetry at the intermediate level, typically including selections from Catullus, Cicero, Livy, or Ovid.

In 05F, Seneca and His Set. An introduction to the rich literary scene of the Neronian period. Readings taken from Seneca’s farce, The Pumpkinification of Claudius, from his personal letters, and from the Octavia, a dramatic production (in which Seneca appears as a character). Graver.

In 06S and 06F, topics to be announced.

In 07S, Grammar and Love in Ancient Rome. After a quick glance at their proper and improper predecessors (Vergil’s Aeneid, Book 4; selected poems of Catullus), reading and discussion of selections from Ovid’s Amores and Petronius’ Satyricon. Tatum.

Prerequisite: Latin 3, or equivalent. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W.

20. Vergil

06W: 1007W: 10A

Fides and pietas are among the more prominent values that inform the horrida bella of the last three books of Aeneid. The destructive fury and the nobility of the princes, warrior princess, and other heroes great and small on both sides will be the focus of our reading in Latin of important parts of Book 9 and all of Books 10-12 of the Aeneid.

Prerequisite: Latin 10, or equivalent. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Bradley, Graver.

22. Literature of the Republic

05F: 10A

In 05F, Friendship. Explores the political, literary, and philosophical dimensions of amicitia in a variety of texts from the last century of the Republic, from the poetry of Catullus to the personal correspondence of Cicero. Issues to be considered include the boundaries of personal intimacy, countercultural implications of friendship circles, the intersection of friendship with patronage networks, and alternatives to sheer utility as the basis of friendship.

Prerequisite: Latin 10, or equivalent. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Graver.

24. The Augustan Age

Not offered in the period from 05F through 07S

26. Literature of the Early Empire

Not offered in the period from 05F through 07S

28. Literature of the Later Empire and the Middle Ages

07S: 10A

Readings from the late Empire to the high Middle Ages that will include selections from the Vulgate, St. Augustine’s Confessions, the Passion of Saints Perpetua and Felicity, Hrotsvitha’s Dulcitius, and the Carmina Burana.

Prerequisite: Latin 10, or equivalent. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Tatum.

30. Special Topics in Latin Literature

06S: 10A

In 06S, Ovid, Apuleius, and the Metamorphoses of Ancient Rome. A cross reading of two of the great, influential works of Latin Literature. The divine and magical transformations worked by the gods, the poet, and the writer of fiction, as told in the Roman Ovid’s epic-length poem the Metamorphoses and the North African Apuleius’ novel of the same name, written a century and a half later. Tatum.

Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. The staff.

85. Independent Reading and Research

All terms: Arrange

87. Thesis

All terms: Arrange

Independent research and writing under the supervision of a member of the Classics faculty. Open to honors students in their senior year and to other qualified students by consent of the Department.

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

GREEK

1-3. Intensive Greek

Not offered in the period from 05F through 07S

1. Introductory Greek

05F, 06W, 06F, 07W: 9

Study of Greek grammar, syntax, and vocabulary accompanied by reading of simple Greek prose selections. Never serves in partial satisfaction of the Distributive Requirement. The staff.

3. Intermediate Greek

06W, 06S, 07W, 07S: 9

Continued study of Greek grammar and syntax. Readings in Greek prose authors. Completion of Greek 3 satisfies the College language requirement and serves as a prerequisite to the major in Classical Archaeology. Never serves in partial satisfaction of the Distributive Requirement.

Prerequisite: Greek 1, or equivalent. The staff.

10. Readings in Greek Prose and Poetry

05F: 2 06S, 06F: 1007S: 9

Readings in Greek prose and poetry at the intermediate level, typically including selections from Plato and/ or Euripides.

In 05F, Plato’s Alcibiades. We will be reading Plato’s Alcibiades in ancient Greek. Particular attention will be placed on the person of Alcibiades - one of the most infamous persons in Western history - and how Socrates seeks to entice him into a philosophical life by promises of world rule. In the course of the dialogue, we will be introduced to some of Plato’s most important philosophical themes, and we will also explore the relationship Plato envisioned between philosophy and politics. Tell.

In 06F, New Testament. A brief introduction to the language, vocabulary, and idiom of the New Testament Greek, followed by readings in the Gospels and the Epistles of Paul. Whaley.

Prerequisite: Greek 3, or equivalent. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W.

20. Homer

06S: 2

Reading in Greek and discussion of selections from the Iliad (06S) or Odyssey. Reading of the whole poem in translation and discussion of its character, style, and composition.

Prerequisite: Greek 10, or equivalent. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Tell.

22. The Lyric Age of Greece

07W: 2

A study of selected poetry from the archaic period of Greek literature. In addition to excerpts from the hexameter poems of Hesiod and the Homeric hymns, readings will include shorter lyric poems such as those of Archilochus, Alcaeus, Sappho, Theognis, Xenophanes and Anacreon. Discussion will include both literary aspects of the poems and their social and cultural context, including the ways in which gender is figured in their performance.

Prerequisite: Greek 10, or equivalent. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. The staff.

24. Theatre

07S: 10

A study of the tragedy and comedy of Classical Greece through detailed reading of at least one play of Aeschylus, Euripides, Sophocles, and Aristophanes.

Prerequisite: Greek 10, or equivalent. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Williamson.

26. Intellectual Enquiry in Classical Athens

Not offered in the period from 05F through 07S

28. Philosophy

06W: 2

Key Concepts in Aristotelian Thought. An introductory-level survey of Aristotle’s achievements. Readings from the biological, ethical, metaphysical, and political works chosen to illustrate key concepts such as aitia (cause), dunamis (capacity), telos (end), and orexis (desire), together with supplementary materials in English.

Prerequisite: Greek 10, or equivalent. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: LIT; WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: W. Graver.

29. New Testament

06F: 10

A brief introduction to the language, vocabulary, and idiom of New Testament Greek, followed by readings in the Gospels and the Epistles of St. Paul.

Prerequisite: Greek 10, or equivalent. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: W. Whaley.

30. Special Topics in Greek Literature

05F: 206X: 10A

In 05F, Plato’s Alcibiades. We will be reading Plato’s Alcibiades in ancient Greek. Particular attention will be placed on the person of Alcibiades - one of the most infamous persons in Western history - and how Socrates seeks to entice him into a philosophical life by promises of world rule. In the course of the dialogue, we will be introduced to some of Plato’s most important philosophical themes, and we will also explore the relationship Plato envisioned between philosophy and politics. Tell.

In 06X, Stories and Storytellers in Ancient Greece. How did the Greeks tell stories and what did they get from them when they did? A seminar of ancient narrative art, ranging from Homer (8th century BCE) to the Greek novelists (2nd century CE). We will read Greek selections from the Odyssey, Herodotus’ Histories, Lucian’s True History, and Longus’ Daphnis and Chloe, as well as selected theory, ancient and modern, on how such narratives are to be made and interpreted. Tatum.

Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W.

85. Independent Reading and Research

All terms: Arrange

87. Thesis

All terms: Arrange

Independent research and writing under the supervision of a Department member. Open to honors students in their senior year and other qualified students by the consent of the Department.

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

MODERN GREEK

11. Modern Greek I

07W: 9

An introduction to Modern Greek as a spoken and written language, with emphasis on practical conversation. Intensive study of basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary through drills, conversation, written exercises, and oral presentations, supplemented by laboratory exercises and by drill-sessions with a teaching assistant.

No previous knowledge of Greek is assumed. Never serves in partial satisfaction of the Distributive Requirement. Kacandes.