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Religion

Chair: Susan Ackerman

Professors S. Ackerman, I. Amadiume, N. K. Frankenberry, R. M. Green, R. G. Henricks; Associate Professors E. Z. Benor, S. Heschel, A. K. Reinhart; Assistant Professors C. E. Hardy III, C. H. MacEvitt, R. Ohnuma, G. Raz; Visiting Professors N. L. Adams, C. Hillenbrand, R. Hillenbrand; Lecturer B. J. Didier.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR

Prerequisite: Religion 1.

Requirements: In addition to Religion 1, the major consists of nine courses including:

1. At least two courses from the Introductory series on Religion (Religion 2 through 19).

2. At least one course from the Approaches to the Study of Religion series (Religion 20 through 23).

3. At least two courses from the Intermediate series on Religion (Religion 24 through 79).

4. One on-campus seminar in Religion (Religion 80 or 81). Students should note that some seminars will have prerequisites. Consult the Chair for more information.

5. As Culminating Experience, either completion of the Honors Program, or the Senior Colloquium (Religion 85), or an Advanced Independent Study (Religion 84). Consult the Chair for more information.

6. The major must include at least one Religion Department course from among those designated as fulfilling the Non-Western requirement.

No more than three transfer courses, which may include Religion 76, 77 (on D.F.S.P.), will be accepted for major credit. All transfer courses must be approved in advance by the Department.

Major programs are subject to the approval of the Chair.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MODIFIED MAJOR

Prerequisite: Religion 1.

Requirements: In addition to Religion 1, 11 courses of which 7 or more shall be in the Department.

1. At least two courses from the Introductory series on Religion.

2. At least one course from the Approaches to the Study of Religion series.

3. At least one course from the Intermediate series on Religion.

4. One on-campus seminar in Religion. Students should note that some seminars will have prerequisites.

5. As Culminating Experience, either completion of the Honors Program, or the Senior Colloquium (Religion 85), or an Advanced Independent Study (Religion 84). Consult the Chair for more information.

The remainder may be courses in other departments provided that such courses constitute a coherent program of study in religion. Approval of the modified major must be obtained from the Chair.

The modified major must include at least one Religion Department course from among those designated as fulfilling the Non-Western requirement.

No more than three transfer courses, which may include Religion 76, 77 (on D.F.S.P.), will be accepted for major credit. All transfer courses must be approved in advance by the Department.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR

Prerequisite: Religion 1.

Requirements: In addition to Religion 1, the minor consists of five courses to be selected as follows:

1. Two courses from the Introductory series on Religion.

2. At least one course from the Approaches to the Study of Religion series.

3. At least one course from the Intermediate series on Religion.

4. One additional course in Religion (any level).

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS AND FOREIGN STUDY

Courses taken at the University of Edinburgh on the Department’s foreign study program will normally be counted among the intermediate courses required for the major as listed in 2, above. The course offered by the Dartmouth faculty leader is Religion 79.

RELIGION HONORS PROGRAM

Qualified majors (see page XXX) may apply for admission to the Honors Program of the Department during the second or third terms of their junior year. Completion of the Honors Program is prerequisite to graduation with Honors or High Honors in the major subject.

The Honors Program of the Department of Religion is designed to encourage and enable a qualified major student to pursue a long-term independent research project on some topic of interest and importance. Through the project, as guided by a member of the faculty, the student should come to an understanding in depth of the content of the subject and the methodological procedures necessary to enable him or her to reach the desired goal.

During two terms of the senior year the honors student will pursue the project under the guidance of a selected faculty member by enrolling in Religion 86 (Honors I: Research) and 87 (Honors II: Writing). The student is expected to produce a substantial thesis as the culmination of the project. That is, a paper of seventy-five to one hundred pages would be considered usual, although the exact nature of the project might dictate a different length. The student will be expected to maintain at least a ‘B+’ level of performance throughout the two terms. Unless at least a grade of B+ is assigned the thesis and a cumulative average of 3.0 is maintained in the major, he or she will not be considered to have successfully completed the project. If in the judgment of the Department the student has failed to perform at the minimal level, it will have the right to terminate the project at the end of the first or the second term.

In order to qualify for an Honors Program in the Religion Department, the student must have at the time of application an average of 3.0 in all subjects and 3.3 in the major. The interested candidate should in consultation with a faculty adviser decide on a course of study, reading and writing, and should then embody these proposals in a petition to the Department.

Preparation and Submission of Thesis Proposal. After the proposal is approved by the faculty adviser, it will be submitted to the Religion Department for approval. Since the Department may request that the student rewrite the proposal, we recommend that a proposal be submitted to the Department by the seventh week of the spring term of the junior year.

Thesis Writing. A student must write a two-term thesis, for which two course credits may be received. A thesis written during the fall and winter must be submitted by the end of the first week in May. A thesis completed during the spring term must be submitted by the end of the third week in May. An oral defense will be scheduled shortly thereafter.

The Honors Program counts as fulfilling the Culminating Experience requirement. Honors students are normally expected to participate in the Senior Colloquium but are excused from the writing component.

ELEMENTARY COURSE

1. Patterns of Religious Experience

04F, 05W, 05F, 06W: 11

A comparative study of some of the basic patterns of religion. The course will focus upon such themes as religious experience, myths of creation, stories of religious founders and heroes, the origin and resolution of human suffering, and the structure and meaning of religious community and ritual. Source material for these themes will be taken from the literary and artistic resources of the following religious traditions: Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, and Judaism.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR or INT. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV or INT. The staff.

INTRODUCTORY COURSES

2. Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion

Not offered in the period from 04F through 06S

The course will introduce students to some central issues in the philosophical evaluation and interpretation of religious belief and practice. We will read texts from a variety of philosophical perspectives dealing with the justification of religious belief, the problem of evil, religious experience, religious language, and the nature and destiny of the human person. Some attention will be given to comparative issues in the philosophy of religion.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV. The staff.

For courses at the Intermediate level in Philosophy of Religion, see courses numbered 22, 29, 30-36, 62, 63, 79.

3. Modern Religious and Anti-Religious Thinkers

05W, 06S: 12

Critical examination of some of the most influential modern proponents and opponents of religious faith, with special emphasis on the question: what is involved in belief in God?

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: W. Frankenberry.

For courses at the Intermediate level in Philosophy of Religion, see courses numbered 22, 29, 30-36, 62, 63, 79.

4. Religion of Israel: The Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) (Identical to Jewish Studies 4)

04F, 06W: 10

An introduction to the religion of ancient Israel through an examination of a number of the Books of the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible), including Genesis, Exodus, Joshua, Samuel, the Psalms, Job, and the prophets. Attention will also be given to the religion of Israel’s Phoenician and Mesopotamian neighbors.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: W. Ackerman.

For courses at the Intermediate level in biblical and ancient Near Eastern religions, see courses numbered 23, 56-58.

5. Early Christianity: The New Testament

05S: 11

An examination of primitive Christianity as witnessed by the writings of the New Testament. Emphasis will be given to the literary and historical analysis of the Gospels and Epistles, and to an understanding of the pre-Christian and non-Christian religions of the Hellenistic world.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: W. The staff.

For courses at the Intermediate level in biblical and ancient Near Eastern religions, see courses numbered 23, 56-58.

6. Introduction to Judaism (Identical to Jewish Studies 6)

04F: 12

The readings and lectures in this course will be devoted to giving an outline of the Jewish religion, both in its ideas and its practices. Materials will be drawn from rabbinic, medieval, and modern Judaism.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: W. Benor.

For courses at the Intermediate level in Judaism, see courses numbered 30, 60-64.

7. First-Year Seminars in Religion

Consult special listings

8. Introduction to Islam

04F: 2

A survey of important topics in the study of Islam, including the Qur’an and the Prophet, Orientalism and the Western Study of Islam, the role of Islamic mysticism, Islam and the State, Islamic law and Islamic theories of family and person.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: NW. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: NW. Didier.

For courses at the Intermediate level in Islam, see courses numbered 70-73.

9. Hinduism

06W: 2

An introductory survey of the Hindu religious tradition of South Asia from 1500 B.C.E. down to the present day. Emphasis will be given to the historical development of elite, Sanskritic Hinduism and its constant interaction with popular and local traditions.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: NW. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: NW. Ohnuma.

For courses at the Intermediate level in the Religions of India, see courses numbered 40- 41.

10. The Religions of China

05S, 06S: 10

An introduction to China’s three major religions—Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism—through the reading of classic texts. Also, a look at important elements in Chinese folk religion—ancestor worship, temples, heavens and hells, and forms of divination. Special attention will be paid to the importance of government in Chinese religious thought, and to continuity and change in the history of Chinese religion.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: NW. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: NW. Raz.

For courses at the Intermediate level in Chinese Religions, see courses numbered 45-49.

11. Religion and Morality

04F: 2A

An examination of the process of moral reasoning and its relationship to religious belief. Emphasis will be given to the analysis of issues that have drawn the special attention of religious ethicists; among these are abortion, stem cell research, the treatment of congenitally impaired newborns, same-sex marriage, and physician assisted suicide.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV. Green.

For courses at the Intermediate level in Ethics, see courses numbered 25-28.

12. Religion and Society in America

05W: 205F: 10

A study of religious groups and movements in this country, ranging from the major institutional faiths to religious protest groups, cults, and the religions of the ‘counter-culture.’ Special attention is given to the social forces which shape religious expression in America.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: W. Hardy.

For courses at the Intermediate level in Religion in America, see course numbered 24.

13. Beyond God the Father: An Introduction to Gender and Religion (Identical to Women’s and Gender Studies 35.1)

06W: 2A

A survey of contemporary writings that explore the relations between gender and religion in the West from historical, anthropological, theological, and philosophical perspectives. The course serves as an introduction both to gender studies and to the study of religion. Topics to be discussed include: current theories of “gender” and of “religion,” androcentric scriptures, patriarchal institutions and matriarchal myths, sexual prohibitions, body politics, queering religion, feminist theology, and the emergence of feminist philosophies of religion. Authors may include: Mary Daly, Judith Butler, Caroline Walker Bynum, Donna Haraway, Pamela Anderson, Grace Jantzen, Howard Eilberg-Schwartz, Pierre Bourdieu, Rosemary Ruether, Elizabeth Schussler-Fiorenza, and others.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: W. Frankenberry.

For courses at the Intermediate level in Religion in America, see course numbered 24.

14. Women, Religion and Social Change in Africa and African Diaspora (Identical to African and African American Studies 42 and Women’s and Gender Studies 35)

Not offered in the period from 04F through 06S

This introductory, multidisciplinary course examines women’s religious ideas, beliefs, concerns, actions, rituals and socio-cultural experiences in African societies and cultures from a comparative, historical and gender perspective. We will consider women’s experiences of social change in African religions, the encounter with Islam, slavery, Christianity, and colonialism. Analysis is given to the articulations of economic and political power or lack of power in religious ideas and to such questions as: What are the different antecedents and circumstances in which women exercise or are denied agency, leadership, power and happiness in their communities? What can those in the Western world learn from African women that is of use for better ways of living today? Texts will include nonfiction, fiction, and film narratives.

Open to all students. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: NW. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: NW.

For courses at the Intermediate level in the Religions of Africa, see courses numbered 23, 50 and 51.

15. The Christian Tradition (Pending faculty approval)

05W: 12 06S: 10

An introduction to the variety of Christian beliefs, institutions and practices from the first century through to the end of the sixteenth century. Attention will be focused on understanding how Christian communities adapted and developed religious beliefs and practices in the face of changing historical circumstances.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: W. MacEvitt.

For courses at the Intermediate level in the Christian tradition, see courses numbered 31- 34.

16. Modern Islam

06W: 12

An introduction to developments in religious thought and practice since 1800, with special emphasis on topics of current controversy, including the status of women, the nature of government, and the place of Islamic Law.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: NW. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: NW.

For courses at the Intermediate level in Islam, see courses numbered 70-73.

17. Introduction to Black Religion in the United States (Identical to African and African American Studies 37)

05W: 10 06W: 12

This course explores and analyzes the highly diverse religious expressions and postures among persons of African descent in the United States. While the direction of the course is largely chronological, it is not intended as a comprehensive survey of black religion in the United States. This course will, however, situate black religious practice and thought in the larger terrain of American religious history and explore several themes that will help us grapple with how black people have shaped their religious culture and thought since slavery.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: W. Hardy.

18. Indian Buddhism

05F: 2

An introductory survey of the Buddhism of South Asia from its beginnings in the 6th century B.C.E. to its eventual demise in the 12th century C.E. Emphasis will be given to the major beliefs, practices, and institutions characteristic of Indian Buddhism, the development of its different varieties (Hinayana, Mahayana, and Vajrayana), and its impact upon South Asian civilization at large.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: NW. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: NW.

For courses at the Intermediate level in the Religions of India, see courses numbered 40- 41.

19. Experimental Curriculum Course—Introductory Level

04F: 9L

The contents of this course will vary from term to term. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV (except when otherwise noted). WCult: Varies.

In 04F, Religious Conflict and Collective Violence (Identical to Anthropology 12.1). The primary aim of this course is to examine the nature of religious conflict and the processes by which disputes between competing communities often escalate into public, acrimonious and even violent social conflicts. In the course we will examine a number of religious conflicts and consider why terrorism and collective violence committed against others remains such a popular way of expressing disagreement; and whether religion can also serve as an instrument for peace and reconciliation. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV. Didier.

APPROACHES TO THE STUDY OF RELIGION COURSES

20. Classical Approaches to the Study of Religion

06W: 9

This course is an introduction to the study of religion through its history. Students will read classics in the field of religion focusing on specific themes as analytical concepts and examining the relation between them. The topic will change with each offering. By the end of the term students will have acquired a familiarity with the ways in which religion has been studied, and will have had occasion to reflect, themselves, on major questions that have engaged scholars for the last 150 years.

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV.

21. Magic, Science, and Religion

05W: 10

Can significant distinctions be drawn between religious and magical ritual? Do magic and religion thrive in opposition to the science of their time or in congruence with it? The course addresses such theoretical questions in the Study of Religion from perspectives of History, Philosophy of Science, Anthropology, and Cognitive Science. The course will suggest a general theory of conditions under which religion tends to be or tends not to be magical. Students will be invited to challenge that theory.

Open to all sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Benor.

22. Reason and Religious Belief

06S: 10

A study of the principal religious and philosophical arguments for and against religious belief. The first part of the course will consider the question of the justifiability of religious belief through an appeal to religious experience and mysticism, to rational theistic arguments, and to faith, showing the difficulties in each case. The second part of the course will cover alternatives to classical theism and the contemporary challenge of conceptual relativism and religious pluralism.

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV.

For courses at the Introductory level in Philosophy of Religion, see courses numbered 2 and 3.

23. (former 55) Theoretical Approaches to the Study of Myth: Interpreting Ancient Near Eastern Mythology

04F: 12

This course examines various theoretical approaches to the study of mythology that have been developed by scholars in the past century by considering the ways in which these theoretical models have been used in the interpretation of mythologies of two of the great cultures of the ancient Near East, Mesopotamia and Canaan. Readings will include all the major myths of Mesopotamian and Canaanite tradition; major articles by theoreticians of myth such as Bronislaw Malinowski, Clyde Kluckhohn, and Claude Levi-Strauss; and various essays that attempt to apply these theoretical studies to the ancient Near Eastern mythological materials.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: NW. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: NW. Ackerman.

For courses at the Introductory level in biblical and ancient Near Eastern religions, see courses numbered 4-5.

INTERMEDIATE COURSES

24. Latino/a Religious Traditions

Not offered in the period from 04F through 06S

This course is an introduction to the reception and transformation of several religious traditions in two socio-cultural regions of Latin America— Mexico and the “Hispanic Caribbean”— and their continued development in the United States. The first half of the course will explore the history and significance of Mexican Catholicism, and the development and meaning of Mexican-American, or Chicano/a religious traditions in the American Southwest. The second half of the course will focus on the history and culture of the Hispanic Caribbean, particularly of Cuba and Puerto Rico. Afro-Caribbean traditions and Puerto Rican Pentecostalism will be studied as responses to both modernity and the United States’ cultural influence. Expressed historically along a continuum from separatism to creolization, the meaning of Latino/a identity will be analyzed as a truly “New World” cosmological orientation and negotiation of power.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: W.

For courses at the Introductory level in Religion in America, see course numbered 12.

29. Kierkegaard and Religious Existentialism

Not offered in the period from 04F through 06S

A study of the correlation between religious and existential writings in the modern period of Western thought. Critical assessment will be made of the writings of Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Bultmann, Jaspers, Buber, and Tillich.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: W.

For courses at the Introductory level in Philosophy of Religion, see courses numbered 2 and 3.

30. Evil and Suffering: Reflections on the Holocaust

Not offered in the period from 04F through 06S

The course analyzes conceptions of suffering and evil and types of human response to them against the background of the Jewish experience in Europe during the Nazi era. Readings will include works by Theodor Adorno, Hanna Arendt, Augustine, Moses Maimonides, Immanuel Kant, Elaine Pagels, Judith Shklar, Simone Weill.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: W.

For courses at the Introductory level in Philosophy of Religion, see courses numbered 2 and 3. For courses at the Introductory level in Judaism, see course numbered 6 and 19.

31. Sex, Celibacy and the Problem of Purity: Asceticism and the Human Body in Late Antiquity (Identical to Women’s and Gender Studies 35 and Classical Studies 11)

04F: 2

Late Antiquity (c. 300-500 AD) was a time when Christians struggled to understand how gender, family life and religion could intermesh. Did virgins get to heaven faster than those who marry? Can a chaste man and woman live together without succumbing to lust? Were men holier than women? What about women who behaved like men? This course examines the changing understanding of the body, marriage, sexuality, and gender within Christianity through reading saints’ lives, letters, polemical essays and legal texts.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: W. MacEvitt.

32. Mysticism and Christianity

Not offered in the period from 04F through 06 S

In this course we will attempt to locate the phenomena of mysticism historically, theologically, and philosophically. Focusing on selected mystical authors from the Christian middle ages and/or early modern period, we will discuss the genesis of the term mysticism, the experiential and linguistic dimensions of mystical texts, the role of the body, sexuality, and gender in descriptions of union between the believer and the divine, and the ethical implications of mystical discourse. Finally, the importation of mysticism as a category for understanding non-Christian religions will be discussed.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: W.

For courses at the Introductory level in Philosophy of Religion, see courses numbered 2 and 3.

33. Christians, Jews and Muslims in the Age of the Crusades (Pending faculty approval)

06W: 2A

This course will focus on the interactions of the three major religious communities of the medieval Mediterranean—Christian, Jewish and Muslim, beginning with the First Crusade in 1096 and ending with the arrival of the Black Death in 1347. Most towns in the Mediterranean held at least two different religious communities, and many held all three. By examining topics such as pilgrimage, crusade and jihad, the status of minority communities and intellectual life, we will explore how Christians, Jews and Muslims clashed, cooperated, influenced and misunderstood each other.

Open to all classes. MacEvitt.

34. Christianity and Conversion in the Northern World: Vikings, Celts and Anglo-Saxons

06S: 2

This course explores the transformation of Christianity in the early medieval period. The conversion of ‘barbarian’ peoples in northwest Europe between 400-1000 meant Christianity had to adapt to a new environment—one without the Roman Empire, without cities, with different languages, cultures and notion of relations between the human and divine worlds. By exploring the impact the conversion of the people of Ireland, England and Iceland had on Christianity, we will understand how ancient Christianity was transformed into medieval Christianity. We will also explore the appeal this Mediterranean religion had for communities that surrounded the much colder North Sea.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: W.

35. Religion and Science

Not offered in the period from 04F through 06S

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of current developments in the natural sciences and religious or theological interpretations of them. Emphasis is given to understanding an emerging consonance between religion and science in contrast to models of dissonance and conflict, or independence and dialogue. Particular attention is given to (1) evolutionary biology, (2) relativity physics, (3) cosmology, and (4) process theology and philosophy.

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV.

For courses at the Introductory level in Philosophy of Religion, see courses numbered 2 and 3.

36. North American Religious Thought and the Revival of Pragmatism

05W: 10

This course explores a distinctively American tradition of religious thought that developed outside of the strictly doctrinal or theological thinking of churches, synagogues, and mosques. Readings range from the religious writings of the classical pragmatists, including Peirce, James, Santayana, and Dewey, to neopragmatists such as Richard Rorty, and prophetic pragmatists such as Cornel West, and their critics. Topics include the character of religious experience, divinity and nature, the problem of evil, and the meaning of truth.

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: W. Frankenberry.

For courses at the Introductory level in Philosophy of Religion, see courses numbered 2 and 3.

40. Advanced Topics in Indian Religions

06W: 11

This course will focus in some depth on a particular aspect of religion in India—for example, a particular religion, sect, time period, body of literature, type of religion, or religious movement. The topic will change with each offering, and students may take the course more than once. Sample topics include: “Goddesses of India,” “The Anthropology of Hinduism,” “The Hindu Epics—Mahabharata and Ramayana,” and “Mahayana Buddhist Texts.”

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: NW. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: NW.

In 06W, Mahayana Buddhist Texts. An in-depth study of Indian Mahayana Buddhist literature in English translation, including selections from the Perfection of Wisdom sutras, the Lotus Sutra, the Vimalakirti Sutra, the Pure Land corpus, Madhyamaka and Yogacara philosophical treatises, and Tathagatagarbha texts. Emphasis will be placed on locating these texts within the historical context of the rise and development of the Mahayana Buddhist tradition in India, as well as analyzing them closely for their religious ideas. Some background in the study of Buddhism is helpful, but not required. Ohnuma.

For courses at the Introductory level in the Religions of India, see courses numbered 9 and 18.

41. Indian Buddhist Narratives

Not offered in the period from 04F through 06S

An in-depth study of Indian Buddhist narrative literature in English translation. Emphasis will be placed on persistent religious themes and concerns characteristic of Indian Buddhism’s rich tradition of stories, folktales, legends, and myths. Examples of such themes include: the life-story of the Buddha as a paradigmatic model; the doctrines of karma and rebirth; Buddhist moral virtues such as generosity, compassion, and wisdom; the religious paths of lay-followers, monks, and nuns; Buddhist conceptions of the cosmos and of the “good” society; and views concerning caste, class, and gender.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: NW. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: NW.

For courses at the Introductory level in the Religions of India, see courses numbered 9 and 18.

46. Daoism: Transformations of Tradition

04F:12

In this course we will explore the historical developments and transformations of Daoism from its ancient roots to present day practices. We will begin by looking at early traditions of immortality seekers and self-cultivation, and at the religious and philosophical ideas in the ancient Chinese texts of the Laozi, Zhuangzi and Guanzi. We will also examine recent archaeological findings; Imperial religious practices and the complex interaction of Daoism with Buddhism. We will also look at contemporary Daoist practices in China and Taiwan. Along the way we will devote special attention to meditation and divination techniques; alchemy and sexual techniques for transcendence; the place of women and the feminine in Daoism.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: NW. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: NW. Raz.

For courses at the Introductory level in Chinese Religions, see course numbered 10.

47. Buddhism in China

Not offered in the period from 04F through 06S

A study of the advent of Buddhism in China, its accommodating yet transforming response to Chinese traditions and values, the emergence of the authentically Chinese schools of T’ien-T’ai, Hua-yen, Ch’an, and Pure Land Buddhism, and the enduring Buddhist heritage of China.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: NW. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: NW.

For courses at the Introductory level in Chinese Religions, see course numbered 10.

48. Body and Sex in Chinese Religions

05S:12

In this course we will explore how different traditions in China conceptualized the relationship between the human body and the universe, and how individuals can attain immortality and transcendence. After examining different conceptions of the human body in traditional China we will focus on sexual practices advocated by the traditions of immortality-seekers, Daoism and esoteric Buddhism as ways to enlightenment and transcendence. In our explorations we will look at the earliest records of sexual practices found in tombs of the 3rd century BCE, and examine Daoist sexual initiation rites and secret rites practiced by emperors. We will consider how notions of cosmic powers and forces are expressed in sexual rituals and how society views such practices. We will also compare Chinese notions of the body and of sexual practices with those found in West.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: NW. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: NW. Raz.

For courses at the Introductory level in Chinese Religions, see course numbered 10.

49. Advanced Topics in Chinese Religions.

Not offered in the period from 04F through 06S

In this course students will read and discuss the latest research on one of the religions of China, or a particular sect, movement, or time period in the history of Chinese religions. The topic will change with each offering. Thus, students may take this course more than once. Sample topics include: “The Taoist Religion,” “Chinese Buddhism: Pure Land and Ch’an (Zen),” and “Huang-Lao Taoism.”

Prerequisite: Religion 10, Religion 46, or consent of instructor. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: NW. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: NW.

For courses at the Introductory level in Chinese Religions, see course numbered 10.

50. Indigenous African Religions (Identical to AAAS 43)

05W, 06W: 10A

The course aims to introduce students to the study of African religions in their traditional settings, covering some major themes that have interested social researchers and incited debate. The approach is interdisciplinary, introducing gender balance in the study of men’s and women’s experiences of religion in practical everyday living and social action, and analyzing how religion constructs and maintains different gender roles and identities in specific African societies. The construction of Gods and Goddesses and the role of religion in politics are also examined. Finally, the philosophies of African religions are assessed in the context of contemporary epistemological and ethical debates in Feminism, Afrocentricity, and Ecological Movements.

Open to all students. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: NW. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: NW. Amadiume.

For courses at the Introductory level in the Religions of Africa, see course numbered 14.

51. Women’s Spirit Possession Narratives in Cross-Cultural Perspective: Nwapa and the Ezilis (Identical to AAAS 87 and Women’s and Gender Studies 35)

Not offered in the period from 04F through 06S

This multidisciplinary course is a cross-cultural comparison of women’s spirit possession, with emphasis on the significance of women’s socio-religious enchantments by African Goddesses, such as the Water Goddesses in Africa and Ezilis in diaspora African cultures. We will study different accounts and narratives of possession, including Flora Nwapa’s works to assess her radical reconstruction of the Lake Goddess/Mammy Water (Mami wata) as a feminist icon of resistance and freedom. Our sources will include Flora Nwapa’s novels, literary criticism, nonfiction, religion and anthropological texts, art history and films, as we compare, assess and analyze critical issues of voice, choice and the ethics of power in feminisms and religions discourses. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: NW. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: NW.

For courses at the Introductory level in the Religions of Africa, see course numbered 14.

52. (former 23) Women’s Rituals: From Africa and Around the World (Identical to AAAS 66 and Women’s and Gender Studies 35)

05S, 06S: 2A

This course focuses on women’s ritual practices in different cultures and societies, both traditional and modern. It examines and describes women’s ritual actions, cultural beliefs, values and social practices, through alternative theories and models that enable us to better understand the full possibilities of culture and religion in shaping our daily lives for a happier and more just world. It aims to de-emphasize the marginalization, invisibility and exclusion of women in male-dominated religious, cultural and social practices by studying women’s lives in a multiplicity of roles as shaped by women’s knowledge systems, religions and cultural traditions from the cradle to the grave.

The course is multidisciplinary and will use sources from social history, religion, anthropology, literature, Art, documentary film, and science.

 Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: NW. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: NW. Amadiume.

For courses at the Introductory level in the Religions of Africa, see course numbered 14. Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV.

53. Religion and the Iroquois Longhouse (Identical to Native American Studies 53)

Not offered in the period from 04F through 06S

The Longhouse tradition of the Rotinonhsiónni (or Iroquois people), seeks to build, maintain, and extend, a network of relationship, the ‘extended house,’ between and among human and other-than-human communities. Thus it works to integrate more obviously religious structures with such domains as economics, ecology, gender relations, decision-making, language, and diplomacy. This course will utilize Native and non-Native sources to enrich our understanding of this intricate system, paying attention to both its historical development and its present reality. The course is oriented toward the production of student research papers.

Prerequisite: It is highly recommended that students have taken either Native American Studies 17/Religion 17, or Native American Studies 21/Anthropology 4, or have done other work in the study of Native American cultures. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: NW. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: NW.

For courses at the Introductory level in Native American Religious Systems, see course numbered 17.

54. Native American Revitalization Movements. (Identical to Native American Studies 33)

Not offered in the period from 04F through 06S

Revitalization theory focuses on movements that attempt to restructure, reconstitute, or transform traditional practices, values, and ideas in the face of drastically changing conditions that threaten a people’s cultural or physical survival. This course will explore the dynamics of these movements through important case studies including the pre-invasion Iroquois Confederacy; the movement led by the Shawnee Prophet; the Handsome Lake Movement; The Ghost Dance; and the Peyote Movement. We will reexamine established theoretical explanation by placing new emphasis on Native experiences and perspectives. We will conclude with a look at recent developments in Indian Country that might constitute new kinds of revitalization. Dist: SOC. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W.

For courses at the Introductory level in Native American Religious Systems, see course numbered 17.

56. Women and the Bible (Identical to Women’s and Gender Studies 35)

05F: 10A

As contemporary Jewish and Christian communities of faith face the question of the role of women within their traditions, many turn to the Bible for answers. Yet the biblical materials are multivalent, and their position on the role of women unclear. This course intends to take a close look at the biblical tradition, both the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) and the New Testament, to ask what the Bible does —and does not say—about women. Yet the course is called “Women and the Bible,” not “Women in the Bible,” and implicit in this title is a second goal of the course: not only to look at the Bible to see what it actually says about women but also to look at differing ways that modern feminist biblical scholars have engaged in the enterprise of interpreting the biblical text.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: CI.

For courses at the Introductory level in biblical and ancient Near Eastern religions, see courses numbered 4-5.

57. Readings in the Biblical Tradition

Not offered in the period from 04F through 06S

In this course, we will engage in an in-depth study of a particular biblical book or of a particular biblical motif. The topic will change with each offering, and students may therefore take this course more than once. Sample topics include: “The Exodus Tradition”; “Job and the Joban Tradition”; “Apocalyptic Traditions.”

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV. WCult: Varies.

For courses at the Introductory level in biblical and ancient Near Eastern religions, see courses numbered 4-5.

58. Topics in the Bible and Archeology

Not offered in the period from 04F through 06S

In this course, we will study the relationship between various biblical texts and archaeological discoveries from the ancient Near East, including ancient Israel, and from the Roman Empire during the period of Christian origins. Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which archaeological data can be used and abused in attempts to understand the Bible better. The specific topic of the course will change with each offering, and students may therefore take this class more than once.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV. WCult: Varies.

For courses at the Introductory level in biblical and ancient Near Eastern religions, see courses numbered 4-5.

60. Classical and Medieval Judaism

04F: 10

A survey of the mind and culture of the Jews from the destruction of the Temple in 70 A.D. through the Golden Age in Spain. Development of the Old Testament into rabbinic law and legend. Beginnings of mysticism, magic, and the world of Kabbala. Representative medieval religious philosophies. Influences of Zoroastrianism, Islam, and the Papacy.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: W. Benor.

For courses at the Introductory level in Judaism, see courses numbered 6 and 19.

61. Modern Judaism

Not offered in the period from 04F through 06S

This course will concentrate on modern Jewish thought in the period beginning with Spinoza’s challenge to the Bible. In turn, a figure of the Enlightenment (Moses Mendelssohn), then a founder of neo-Orthodoxy (S. R. Hirsch), then the central figure of Reform (Abraham Geiger), and such later figures as Martin Buber, Ahad H’Am, and Franz Rosenzweig will be read and discussed.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: W.

For courses at the Introductory level in Judaism, see courses numbered 6 and 19.

62. Jewish Mysticism

Not offered in the period from 04F through 06S

The course examines the nature of claims to mystical experience or knowledge as they appear in various aspects of the Jewish tradition with primary focus on the enchanted and demonic worlds of the Kabbala. Forms of ecstasy, theurgy, and magic will be studied along with their theoretical and social backgrounds and their impact on elitist and popular Jewish practice. One class meeting every week will be devoted to readings in the Zohar, a classic work of the medieval Kabbala. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: W.

For courses at the Introductory level in Philosophy of Religion, see courses numbered 2 and 3. For courses at the Introductory level in Judaism, see courses numbered 6 and 19.

63. From Spinoza to Levinas: Varieties of Modern Jewish Thought (Identical to Jewish Studies 70)

Not offered in the period from 04F through 06S

The course examines several ways in which Jewish thought became modern, responding positively or critically to modernization or taking the lead in the process. Issues discussed will include: the challenge of modern science, the post-feudal state, “election” and citizenship, centrality of the self and its religious experience, Mysticism and charismatic community, transcendence of the self in relations, the challenge of existentialism and pragmatism and the revolt against autonomy.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: W.

For courses at the Introductory level in Philosophy of Religion, see courses numbered 2 and 3. For courses at the Introductory level in Judaism, see courses numbered 6 and 19.

65. The Theology of Augustine

Not offered in the period from 04F through 06S

An analysis of the chief points of the doctrinal work of Augustine. Writings to be examined include his autobiography The Confessions, the historical panorama of The City of God, and several of his major theological, scriptural, and polemical books, as well as a selection from his popular sermons. An attempt will be made to place Augustine within the religious and cultural context of the fourth and fifth century Roman Empire as well as to survey his influence in later Western Christian thought.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: W.

For courses at the Introductory level in the Christian tradition, see course numbered 15.

66. The Theology of Aquinas

Not offered in the period from 04F through 06S

An examination of the doctrinal system of Thomas Aquinas in its principal parts: the concepts of Revelation, God, the Trinity, Creation, Christ, the Church and Sacraments and Eschatology. At certain major points Aquinas’ theories will be compared critically with those of other leading medieval theologians: Bonaventura, Duns Scotus, and Ockham.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: W.

For courses at the Introductory level in the Christian tradition, see course numbered 15.

67. The Protestant Reformation: Origins, Legacies and Modern Appropriations (Pending faculty approval)

05S: 11

This course will consider the origins of the Protestant Reformation, its legacy as a bridge to the modern world, and its appropriation by modern Christian thinkers in the twentieth century. Changing conceptions of the human person and Christian identity as they relate to the church, state and the larger world will be explored in the thought of Luther, Calvin, and other reformers. With an eye to the unintended consequences of secularization, this course will also consider the appropriation of reformation thought in the modern period in the work of thinkers including Karl Barth, Reinhold Niebuhr, and Martin Luther King, Jr.

Open to juniors and seniors, and to sophomores by permission. Hardy.

For courses at the Introductory level in the Christian tradition, see course numbered 15.

69. Contemporary Christianity

06W: 2

A survey of Christianity from World War I to the 1980s. The emphasis will be placed on intellectual and social developments in the Christian Church as it adjusted itself to the social and cultural effects of the World Wars and the Depression, changes in historical and scientific outlooks, the civil rights struggles of minorities, the end of the colonial era, and the rise of mass urbanism and high technology in Euro-America.

Open to all classes. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: W.

For courses at the Introductory level in the Christian tradition, see course numbered 15.

70. Islamic Mysticism (Sufism)

05S: 2A

This course will first trace the development of Sufism, including its Christian and Hindu heritage. Then, using a Sufi manual of instruction, students will work their way through the metaphysic of Sufism. Finally, using films and recordings, the class will consider the rituals, practices, and role of the Sufi orders of Islam in recent Islamic history.

Prerequisite: Religion 1, or 8, or History 5.2, 70 or some familiarity with the Islamic world, or permission of the instructor. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: NW. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: NW. C. Hillenbrand.

For courses at the Introductory level in Islam, see courses numbered 8 and 16.

71. Islam in North America: A Regional Variety of Islam

Not offered in the period from 04F through 06S

Muslims and Islamicists alike speak of Islam as if it were an undifferentiated item, the same in its essence whether in the Philippines or in Philadelphia. In this course we will consider North American Islam as a particular example of a regional variety of Islam. By looking at Islam on this continent we can examine the ways in which Islam is both a trans-local and local phenomenon and examine the ways in which it has spread. We will particularly examine Humphrey Fisher’s paradigm of Islamic conversion and we will briefly compare it to other areas in which Islam has become a local religion. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: W.

For courses at the Introductory level in Islam, see courses numbered 8 and 16.

72. The Qur’an and the Prophet

Not offered in the period from 04F through 06S

The Qur’an and the Prophet Muhammad are the source and center of Islam. In this course we will consider the form and content of the Qur’an and the form and content of various accounts of the Prophet’s life: the hadith or anecdotes of the Prophet’s life, the sirah or biography of Muhammad, and the maghazi, or accounts of the Prophet’s battles and campaigns. We will be particularly interested in the ways in which the Prophet and the Qur’an become principles and sources of knowledge, rather than a religious hero and a text.

Prerequisite: A College course on Islamic history, culture, or society, such as Religion 8, Religion 16, History 5.2, etc. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR; WCult: NW. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV; WCult: NW.

For courses at the Introductory level in Islam, see courses numbered 8 and 16.

73. Advanced Topics in the Study of Islam

05S, 05X: 10A

This course will focus on a particular topic in Islamic studies, with an emphasis on the most recent research in that field. The topic will vary with each offering, so the course may be taken more than once. Sample topics include: “The Islam of Morocco,” “Shi’ism,” and “Problems in Popular Islam.” Prerequisites: A previous course on Islamic religion or Islam-icate history and culture, or permission of the instructor. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV. WCult: Varies.

In 05S, Islamic Heterodoxy: The Assassins of Iran and Syria. C. Hillenbrand.

In 05X, Al-Ghazali: Mystic, Theologian, and Lawyer. C. Hillenbrand.

For courses at the Introductory level in Islam, see courses numbered 8 and 16.

76. Foreign Study in Religion I

04F, 05F: D.F.S.P.

Credit for this course is awarded to students who have successfully completed a religion course at the University of Edinburgh while a member of the Dartmouth Foreign Study Plan in Religion.

Prerequisite: two courses in Religion. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV.

77. Foreign Study in Religion II

04F, 05F: D.F.S.P.

Credit for this course is awarded to students who have successfully completed a religion course at the University of Edinburgh while a member of the Dartmouth Foreign Study Plan in Religion.

Prerequisite: two courses in Religion. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV.

79. Experimental Curriculum Course

04F: D.F.S.P. 05S: 2 05X: 10A, 2A 05F: D.F.S.P.

The contents of this course will vary from term to term. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV. WCult: Varies.

In 04F, D.F.S.P. Goddesses of India. This course will use both elite and popular Hindu religious texts in conjunction with contemporary sociological and anthropological accounts, scholarly analyses, visual art, and film to explore the diverse identities and roles of India’s many goddesses, both ancient and modern. Special emphasis will also be given to the relationship between goddesses and women. Ohnuma.

In 05S, Art and Islam: Religious Themes in Islamic Art. R. Hillenbrand.

In 05X at 10A, Title to be announced. Edinburgh Visitor.

In 05X at 2A, The Crusades from the other side: Islamic perspectives. C. Hillenbrand.

In 05F D.F.S.P., Jewish Views of Jesus (open to Dartmouth and Edinburgh students). Heschel.

ADVANCED COURSES

80-81. Seminars

80. Seminars

04F, 05S: 10A 05F: 2A 06S: 10A

In 04F, Religion, Magic and Science in Traditional China. In this course we will examine how people in Traditional China perceived the relationship between the human body, the state and the universe. Looking at a variety of practices such as self-cultivation, healing, dream interpretation, geomancy and martial arts we will examine perceptions of the human body, spirits, disease and health, life and death in Traditional China. We will analyze the notions of yin and yang, the five phases, qi, the primal energy of the universe and the Dao. We will examine whether modern Western categories such as religion, science and magic are applicable in describing these practices, and try to establish an alternative system of categories. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV. Raz.

In 05S, The Faith of Scientists. This seminar explores the writings of leading scientists, historical and contemporary, on the subject of “God” and “religion.” Selected scientists may include Copernicus, Bacon, Galileo, Kepler, Newton, Darwin, Eddington, Einstein, Carson, Hawking, Sagan, Davies, Dawkins, Weinberg, and Dennett. Emphasis is given to scientists whose worldviews offer alternatives to conventional forms of religious faith, as well as those who attempt to harmonize science with religion. As a collaborative project we will compile an anthology of student-edited readings with critical commentary. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV. Frankenberry.

In 05F, Title to be announced. Hardy.

In 06S, Title to be announced. Raz.

81. Dickinson Distinguished Scholar Seminars

Not offered in the period from 04F through 06S

82. Joint Research in Religious Studies

All terms: Arrange.

Two or more students may enroll in this course to pursue through independent reading and research a topic mutually agreed upon between themselves and the instructor. This course may be used in satisfaction of the seminar requirement.

Permission of the Chair is required.

83. Research in Religious Studies (Independent Study)

All terms: Arrange.

84. Advanced Research in Religious Studies (Independent Study)

All terms: Arrange.

Serves in fulfillment of the Culminating Experience requirement. Open to senior majors only; by permission only. Majors electing this option must submit a research proposal for Departmental approval no later than the end of the Spring term of the Junior year. Students who choose to enroll in Religion 84 as their Culminating Experience are normally expected to participate in the Senior Colloquium but are excused from the writing component of the Colloquium. For more information, consult with the Chair.

85. Senior Colloquium

05W, 06W: 10A

As a culminating activity for senior majors, this colloquium serves as a forum for researching and writing the Senior Essay. Two faculty members convene the colloquia and guide the selection of essay topics. Other faculty and guest speakers may visit during the first five weeks of the term for discussion of common readings. The 25-page Senior Essay is expected (1) to display expertise in at least one cultural area, historical period, methodological approach, or body of literature, (2) to build upon previous course preparation, and (3) to engage with one of several approaches or readings discussed in the colloquium. Students who choose to enroll in Religion 84 or Religion 86 and 87 as their Culminating Experience are normally expected to participate in the Senior Colloquium but are excused from the writing component.

Prerequisite: Religion 1. Open only to senior majors. Class of 2007 and earlier: Dist: PHR. Class of 2008 and later: Dist: TMV.

In 05W, What is Religion? Benor and MacEvitt.

In 06W, What is Religion? Frankenberry and MacEvitt.

86. Honors I (Research)

All terms: Arrange

Open to seniors only; by permission only. Students who choose to enroll in Religion 86 and 87 as their Culminating Experience are normally expected to participate in the Senior Colloquium but are excused from the writing component of the Colloquium.

87. Honors II (Writing)

All terms: Arrange

Open to seniors only; by permission only. Students who choose to enroll in Religion 86 and 87 as their Culminating Experience are normally expected to participate in the Senior Colloquium but are excused from the writing component of the Colloquium.