Skip to main content

Notice

Information on this website is posted for historical reference only. Please visit the Office of the Registrar for current requirements.

English

Chair: Peter W. Travis

Vice-Chair: Melissa F. Zeiger

Professors L. E. Boose, W. W. Cook, J. V. Crewe, E. Hebert, C. Huntington, P. A. McKee, C. Mathis, D. E. Pease, L. A. Renza, P. Saccio, B. R. Silver, T. R. Sleigh, P. W. Travis, D. Wykes; Associate Professors P. W. Cosgrove, J. M. Favor, A. W. Halasz, T. H. Luxon, M. C. Otter, I. T. Schweitzer, B. E. Will, M. F. Zeiger; Assistant Professors C. G. Boggs, G. Edmondson, M. R. Goeman, J. V. McKenzie, K. L. Thomas; Instructor B. P. Giri; Senior Lecturers S. S. Grantham, B. Kreiger, T. Osborne, P. F. Sears; Lecturers S. D. Boone, J. Donaghy, G. A. Lenhart, J. Mackin, D. J. Moody, A. Ouellette, W. Piper, M. Richards; Visiting Professors W. P. Chin, R. A. D. Grant, N. Grene, G. Rohlehr; Visiting Associate Professor N. J. Crumbine; Visiting Assistant Professors S. H. Brown, B. J. Dimmick; Adjunct Assistant Professors K. Gocsik, G. Munafo, C. P. Thum; Research Associate Professor L. J. Davies; Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow L. M. Siraganian.

THE ENGLISH MAJOR

The major described here is for the class of 2006 and following.

A complete description of the requirements for the class of 2005 is available in earlier editions of this Bulletin, on the department website (www.dartmouth.edu/ ~english) and in the department office. In the description of courses, course numbers and period group designations referring specifically to the major for the class of 2005 are indicated in square brackets [ ].

Requirements: The Major in English requires the successful completion of eleven major courses.

1. The courses must satisfy the following distribution requirements according to the Course Groups, listed below: at least 2 courses from Group I; at least 2 courses from Group II; at least 1 course from Group III; at least 1 course from Group IV.

2. In addition, four courses must be selected as forming a concentration in one of the Concentration Areas listed below. Except in the case of students electing Concentration Area 3 (Literary History) these courses may also satisfy the Group requirements outlined above.

3. One course must be a Special Topics Course (English 60-69) or English 90 (Foreign Study Program [FSP]). This course may also satisfy one of the Group requirements outlined above and/or be part of the four-course concentration.

4. One course must be designated as satisfying the Culminating Experience Requirement; this may be an Advanced Seminar (70, 71, 72, 73, 75, or 85) or, in the case of students seeking a degree with Honors, the first term of English 98. This course may also be part of the four-course concentration, but cannot be used to satisfy any of the Course Group requirements. The Culminating Experience course must be taken and completed after the sophomore-junior summer term.

Students electing the major in English should bear in mind the following:

1. Transfer credits normally cannot be used in the major. Students wishing to be granted an exception must petition the CDC (Committee on Departmental Curriculum). If approval is granted, transfer courses are subject to the rules that apply to substitute courses.

2. Two substitute courses (appropriate major courses from other departments at Dartmouth) are permitted within the major. One of those courses may be part of the concentration area. Students wishing to substitute more than one course in their concentration area must petition the CDC. Normally, substitute courses cannot satisfy the Course Group requirements.

3. No substitute courses may satisfy the Culminating Experience requirement.

4. To become an English major, students must consult with a professor from the list of faculty major advisors (posted in the department and on the web) to plan their concentration area. Students formally elect the major in English by submitting a proposed plan of courses—a completed major card—to their major advisor. The major advisor’s signature constitutes admission to the major. Students must meet with their major advisor a second time in the last term of the junior year or the first term of the senior year in order to review their major plan.

5. Students may petition the CDC to adjust a concentration area designation for a course. Such petitions must be endorsed by the faculty member teaching the course.

COURSE GROUPS

I.Literature before the mid-seventeenth century (2 courses required): 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 26, 27, 28, 39, 65, and 70.

II. Literature from the mid-seventeenth century to the end of the nineteenth century (2 courses required): 29, 30, 31, 32, 34, 36, 37, 38, 40, 41, 42, 43, 66, and 71.

III . Literature from the start of the twentieth century to the present (1 course required): 17, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 53, 54, 55, 58, 67, and 72.

IV. Criticism and Theory (1 course required): 14, 15, 16, 18, 59, 63, 75 and Comparative Literature 72.

Courses whose Course Group Assignment Varies: 60, 62, 90, 91, and 98.

Courses with no Course Group Assignment: 10, 11, 69, 74, 80, 81, 81, 83, 85, 96, and 97.

Courses that cannot count for major credit: 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 96 (except by successful petition to the CDC).

CONCENTRATION AREAS

A list of courses in each concentration is posted on the web and available in the English Department office.

1. Literary Theory and Criticism

Courses in this area stress questions on the nature of language and literature, problems in literary interpretation, the relations between readers and literary works, the history of criticism, and the various schools and theoretical approaches in literary analysis.

2. Genre

Students concentrating on genre should choose four courses dealing with one of following genres: poetry, drama, or narrative. Students wishing to deal with other genres or modes such as tragedy or pastoral or autobiography should formulate an independent proposal under Concentration Area 10.

3. Literary History

Students concentrating on literary history must select four additional courses from Course Groups I, II, and III in the following manner: two courses from Course Group I and one each from Course Groups II and III. A course not included in Course Groups I, II, and III may be included if it is posted under Literary History in the list of courses by concentration area.

4. Period Study

Students pursuing period study should select four courses from any one of the historical course groups (Course Groups I, II and III). Students may choose to have these four courses form a more precise focus such as medieval literature or Victorian studies.

5. National Traditions and Counter-Traditions

Courses in this area address literary works and critical methods that invoke or question national identity and its dominant narratives. Courses may also examine the ways in which nations are defined and national practices and consciousnesses are constructed or challenged.

6. Multicultural and Colonial / Postcolonial Studies

Courses in this area focus on literature in English other than British or American and on British or American literature that addresses colonial/post-colonial experience. The concentration involves attention to critical perspectives and theories on race, ethnicity, migration, colonialism, transnationalism, and globalization.

7. Genders and Sexualities

Literary works and critical approaches that address, represent, or critique ideas of gender and sexual identity. This area includes courses on sexuality, feminism, gay and lesbian studies, masculinity, and queer theory.

8. Cultural Studies and Popular Culture

Literary works, critical approaches and theories that draw together social, literary, and cultural discourses or challenge distinctions such as those between high and low culture, canonical and non-canonical literature, or the disciplines themselves. Courses in this area focus on issues such as class, the production of cultural value, the materiality of texts, and the social practices of reading, writing, and representation.

9. Creative Writing

Students electing a concentration in Creative Writing must pass the prerequisite course, English 80, prior to enrolling in any other Creative Writing course. Courses satisfying this Concentration Area must include:

One course selected from English 81, 82, or 83.

English 85, the advanced seminar in Creative Writing.

A course in contemporary poetry, fiction, prose non-fiction or drama in the English department, or a writing course offered by another department (screen writing in Film and Television Studies, play writing in Theater, nature writing in Environmental Studies, for example).

Another course in contemporary poetry, fiction, prose non-fiction or drama in the English department, or a writing course offered by another department (screen writing in Film and Television Studies, play writing in Theater, nature writing in Environmental Studies, for example), or a senior project: either English 97 (one- term) or English 98 (two-term honors project), or a second course chosen from English 81, 82, and 83.

Please note that enrollment in all Creative Writing courses requires the submission of a writing sample and the permission of the instructor. Effectively, this means some students in their sixth term of residence will enroll as English majors with another Concentration Area until they have completed the Creative Writing course sequence.

10. Independent Proposal

Students may propose, by petition to the Committee on the Departmental Curriculum, a Concentration Area different from those listed above. Such proposals, together with a written rationale, must be submitted before the end of the junior year.

MODIFIED MAJORS

Students may propose a modified major in English by designing a special program of study in consultation with a faculty adviser in the Department. One may modify the major in English with a selection of courses from other departments and programs, or one may modify a major in another department or program with a selection of English courses. In both cases the modifying courses nominated must be courses that qualify for major credit in their home department or program. The Culminating Experience should be satisfied according to the primary department’s or program’s rules. Proposals for modifying the major in English should also explain the rationale for modifying the standard major and show how each of the modifying courses relates to the Concentration Area selected.

Proposals for both kinds of modified majors must be submitted to the Vice Chair of the English Department as a formal petition and proposal. Proposals to modify another major with English courses must be approved by the Vice Chair of English before going forward to the primary department or program for final approval as a major program. Proposals to modify the major in English with other courses must be submitted, along with an authorizing signature from the secondary department or program, to the Vice Chair of English and the CDC for their deliberation and approval. The Vice Chair’s signature signifies final approval of a modified major in English.

Modified major in which English is the primary subject:

Requirements: This major requires the successful completion of eleven major courses.

1. All students proposing a modified major with English as the primary department must complete at least 2 courses from Group I; at least 2 courses from Group II; at least 1 course from Group III; at least 1 course from Group IV.

2. In addition, proposals for this modified major must elect Concentration Area number 10 (Independent Proposal) to satisfy the Concentration Area requirement. The proposal for a modified major in English also serves as a proposal for an independently proposed Concentration Area. At least one and no more than two of the four modifying courses selected from other department or program offerings must be included in the independently proposed Concentration Area.

3. Four courses from another department or program must be selected, approved by the CDC, and completed successfully. One or two of these courses must form part of the independent proposal for a Concentration Area.

4. One course must be a Special Topics (63-68) Course or English 90. This course may also satisfy one of the Group requirements outlined above and/or be part of the four-course concentration.

5. One course must be designated as satisfying the Culminating Experience Requirement; this may be an Advanced Seminar (70, 71, 72, 73, 75, or 85), or, in the case of students seeking a degree with Honors, the first term of English 98. This course may be part of the four-course concentration, but may not satisfy any of the Course Group requirements. The Culminating Experience course must be taken and completed after the sophomore-junior summer term.

Modified major in other departments or programs modified with English courses.

Requirements: Four English courses selected from those numbered 10-75 and 90-91. No substitutions or transfer credits are permitted.

THE MINOR IN ENGLISH

The minor in English requires the successful completion of six major courses. Four courses must be selected as forming a concentration in one of the Concentration Areas listed above. No substitutions and no more than one transfer credit will be permitted.

THE MAJOR IN ENGLISH WITH HONORS

Students enrolled in the major in English who have completed at least six major courses by the end of their junior year and have a grade point average (GPA) in the major of 3.4 or higher and an overall college GPA of 3.0 or higher may apply for the Honors Program. Eligible students apply by submitting their college record to the Honors Directors along with a formal proposal of an honors thesis. Students formally approved and enrolled in Creative Writing as a Concentration Area normally propose a creative writing project as a thesis. Students with other Concentration Areas normally propose a critical thesis. The thesis may be completed during one or two terms of English 98, the first of which counts as the Culminating Experience in the major. The second English 98 constitutes a twelfth course in the major program, separate from all other requirements outlined above. The theory requirement should be satisfied before the term in which the candidate completes the honors thesis and submits it for evaluation. That is, no one may satisfy the theory requirement and the thesis requirement in the same term.

For complete information about applying to and successfully completing the Honors Program, including further regulations, deadlines, and advice, please consult the Directors of Honors.

ENGLISH STUDY ABROAD

The English Department offers three Foreign Study Programs (FSPs), one offered annually at the University of Glasgow and two held biennially in alternating years: Dublin (2005, 2007) and Trinidad (2004, 2006). All English FSPs are held during the fall academic term. Participation in all three English FSPs is open to all sophomores, juniors, and seniors. To participate in the program for a given year, students must have completed all first-year requirements and one English course (other than 2, 3, 5 or 7) with a grade of B or better. (The English course requirement may, in certain circumstances, be waived by the director.) To be considered for acceptance to the Trinidad FSP, students should, in addition to the pre-requisites listed above, have completed either the English Department’s “Introduction to Postcolonial Literature” (English 58) or a course deemed equivalent by the FSP director for that year.

Students enrolled on English FSPs register for English 90, 91, and 92. Students who successfully complete any of the three English FSPs will be awarded credit for English 90, English 91, and English 92. English 90 and English 91 will carry major or minor credit; English 92 will carry one non-major college credit. In no case will students receive more than two major or minor credits in English for work completed on an English FSP. The major requirements satisfied by English 90 and 91 vary with each program. For specific information on FSPs and major requirements please consult with the FSP directors and the English Department’s website at URL <www.dartmouth.edu/~english>.

SECTION I: NON-MAJOR COURSES

2. Composition and Research: I

04F, 05F: 12

The course description is given under English 3. This course and English 3 are open only to first-year students invited after an online placement process to participate in the Integrated Academic Support program. All students enrolled in English 2 will continue with English 3. Boone, Gocsik, Lenhart, Mackin, Moody, Munafo, and staff.

3. Composition and Research: II

05W, 06W: 12

This two-term course in first-year composition works on the assumption that excellence in writing arises from serious intellectual engagement. To achieve this excellence, English 2-3 enrolls students into intensive, seminar-style classes in which literary and other works (including the students’ own) are read closely, with attention to substance, structure, and style. The primary goal of English 2 is for students to learn to write clearly and with authority. By submitting themselves to the rigorous process of writing, discussing, and rewriting their papers, students come to identify and then to master the essential properties of the academic argument.

In English 3, students engage in the more sustained discourse of the research paper. These papers are not restricted to literary criticism but might employ the research protocol of other academic disciplines. Throughout the reading, writing, and research processes, students meet regularly with their tutors and professors, who provide them with individualized assistance. English 2-3 is taken in lieu of English 5 and meets the college requirement for composition.

Students who take the English 2-3 sequence defer their First Year Seminar until the spring term. These courses do not serve in partial satisfaction of the Distributive Requirement. Boone, Gocsik, Lenhart, Mackin, Moody, Munafo, and staff.

5. Expository Writing

04F, 05W, 05F, 06W: 9, 10, 10A, 11, 12, 2, 2A

Founded upon the principle that thinking, reading and writing are interdependent activities, English 5 is a writing-intensive course that uses texts from various disciplines to afford students the opportunity to develop and hone their skills in expository argument. Instruction focuses on strategies for reading and analysis and on all stages of the writing process. Students actively participate in discussion of both the assigned readings and the writing produced in and by the class.

Note: English 5 (or 2-3) is required of all first-year students except those exempted for proficiency. This requirement must be fulfilled before the student elects other courses in English or any First-Year Seminar. It never serves in partial satisfaction of the Distributive Requirement. Thomas Cormen, Director of Writing Program, and staff.

6. (former 9) Essay Writing

05S: 10A 06S: Arrange

Limit 12. Open to students who are interested in analytic and expository writing. Students who wish to register must sign up with the Administrative Assistant of the Department of English and attend the first class. This course does not carry major credit. Priority will be at the discretion of the instructor. This course will be taught Credit/No Credit unless otherwise stated. Dist: LIT. Grantham.

7. First-Year Seminars in English

 Consult special listings

8. (former 11) Readings in English and American Literature

Not offered in 2004-2005, may be offered in 2005-2006

A survey of writers and topics of general interest. The course is intended principally for students who are not majoring in English. It does not carry major credit. Writing requirements will be limited to tests and brief exercises. To be offered periodically, but with varying subject matter.

9. Composition: Theory and Practice

05S, 06S: 12

This course explores the complex relationship between writing and knowledge as it is theorized and practiced, focusing on the important pedagogical shifts in Composition and Rhetoric over the last fifty years. Special topics may include how writing is taught (and knowledge constructed) within the disciplines; the intersections of rhetoric, power, and culture; debates concerning collaborative learning and intellectual property; the challenges of multimedia composition; conversations between composition and critical theory.

This course is strongly recommended for those pursuing Secondary Teaching Certification through the Education Department’s Teacher Education Program. This course does not carry major credit. Gocsik.

SECTION II: MAJOR COURSES

Note: All major courses have as a prerequisite English 2/3, English 5 or English 5 exemption status

10. (former 16) The King James Version of the Bible, I

Not offered in 2004-2005, may be offered in 2005-2006

A study of the preeminent English translation of the Hebrew Bible (the Tanak, or Old Testament), with special emphasis on its relationship to English literature and on the history of its interpretation. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Wykes.

11. (former 17) The King James Version of the Bible, II

06S: 10

A study of the preeminent English translation of the Christian scriptures (New Testament), with special emphasis on their revision of the Hebrew Bible, on their relationship to English literature, and on the history of their interpretation. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Wykes.

14. Introduction to Criticism

Not offered in 2004-2005, may be offered in 2005-2006

A historical and formal introduction to literary criticism as a 20th-century discipline, with primary emphasis on English and American contributors. Leading critical figures and critical approaches will be considered; some important critical terms will be reviewed; and students will be given practice in close reading and textual interpretation. Selections from the work of some or all of the following may be included: T.S. Eliot, I.A. Richards, Cleanth Brooks, Kenneth Burke, William Wimsatt, Northrop Frye, Wayne Booth, Paul de Man, Stanley Fish, Harold Bloom, Barbara Johnson, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, and Henry Louis Gates. Complementing English Department courses in particular literary periods, topics, and authors, this course is strongly recommended for majors. Dist: LIT. Course Group IV. Thomas.

15. Introduction to Literary Theory

04F: 12 05W: 10 05S: 2 05F, 06W, 06S: Arrange

The course will introduce students to some of the leading texts, concepts, and practices of what has come to be known as theoretical criticism. Topics to be considered may include some of the following: structuralism, deconstruction, psychoanalysis, feminism, new historicism, post-colonialism, post-modernism, queer theory, and cultural studies. Attention will also be given to historical and institutional contexts of this criticism. Intended to provide a basic, historically informed, knowledge of theoretical terms and practices, this course should enable students to read contemporary criticism with understanding and attempt theoretically informed criticism themselves. Dist: LIT. Course Group IV. Travis, Will, Boggs, McKenzie, Edmondson.

16. Old and New Media

04F: 12 05F: Arrange

A survey of the historical, formal, and theoretical issues that arise from the materiality and technology of communication, representation, and textuality. The course will address topics in and between different media, which may include oral, scribal, print, and digital media. Readings and materials will be drawn from appropriate theorists, historians, and practitioners, and students may be asked not only to analyze old and new media, but also create with them. Dist: LIT. Course Group IV. McKenzie, Halasz.

17. (former 68) Introduction to New Media

Not offered in 2004-2005, may be offered in 2005-2006

This course introduces students to the history, aesthetics, and theory of new media. These forms include hypertextual fiction, web-based artwork, virtual reality, experimental CD- ROMs, and multimedia performance and installation. Engaging the work of such authors and artists as Laurie Anderson, etoy, jodi, Guillermo Gomez-Peña, the Wooster Group, Emergency Broadcasting Network, Brenda Laurel, and Michael Rush, we will address several questions, including how to evaluate and perhaps produce work that combines text, image, sound, and interactivity. Dist: ART. Course Group III [Period Group IV]. McKenzie.

18. A History of the English Language (Identical to Linguistics 18)

05S: 10

The development of English as a spoken and written language as a member of the Indo- European language-family, from Old English (Beowulf), Middle English (Chaucer), and Early Modern English (Shakespeare), to contemporary American English. Emphasis will be given to the linguistic and cultural reasons for ‘language change,’ to the literary possibilities of the language, and to the political significance of class and race. Dist: LIT. Course Group IV. Otter.

19. Anglo-Saxon and Scandinavian Epic and Saga

Not offered in 2004-2005, may be offered in 2005-2006

An introduction to Old English language and literature, this course concentrates on reading, translating and interpreting selected poems understood in terms of their cultural environment—political, historical, artistic, and religious. The major poems studied are ‘The Wanderer,’ ‘The Dream of the Rood,’ and Beowulf. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group I. [Period Group I].

20. Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales

04F: 11 05F: Arrange

An introduction to Chaucer, concentrating on ten of the Canterbury Tales, and studying him as a social critic and literary artist. Special attention will be paid to Chaucer’s language, the sounds of Middle English, and the implications of verse written for the ear. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group I [Period Group I/Single Author]. Travis, Otter.

21. Chaucer: Troilus and Other Poems

Not offered in 2004-2005, may be offered in 2005-2006

A study of Chaucer’s works other than the Canterbury Tales, focusing on some of the early dream visions (Book of the Duchess, House of Fame) and the courtly love romance Troilus and Criseyde, which many consider Chaucer’s most accomplished work. Some attention will be given to the French and Italian context of these works (in translation). Prior acquaintance with Middle English (English 20, 22, or 18) is helpful but not absolutely required. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group I [Period Group I/Single Author]. Travis, Otter.

22. Medieval English Literature

05S: 11 06S: Arrange

An introduction to the literature of the “Middle English” period (ca. 1100- ca. 1500), concentrating on the emergence of English as a literary language in the twelfth and early thirteenth centuries and on some of the great masterworks of the late fourteenth century. Readings will include early texts on King Arthur, the lais of Marie de France, the satirical poem The Owl and the Nightingale, the romance Sir Orfeo, Pearl, and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, the Book of Margery Kempe, and the York Cycle. Most readings in modern English translation, with some explorations into the original language. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group I [Period Group I]. Edmondson.

23. The English Renaissance

04F: 10 06W: Arrange

English verse and prose of the sixteenth century: a study of Wyatt, Gascoigne, Nashe, Marlowe, Sidney, Spenser, Shakespeare, and others in the cultural context of Tudor England. The course will investigate issues of classical and European influence, publication, and courtly patronage, especially under the auspices of a female ruler (Elizabeth I). Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group I [Period Group I]. Halasz, Crewe.

24. Shakespeare I

04F, 05F: 9 05S: 12 05X, 06S: Arrange

A study of about ten plays spanning Shakespeare’s career, including comedies, histories, tragedies, and romances. Attention will be paid to Shakespeare’s language; to his dramatic practices and theatrical milieu; and to the social, political, and philosophical issues raised by the action of the plays. Videotapes will supplement the reading. Exercises in close reading and interpretative papers.

Prerequisite: English 2/3, English 5 or English 5 exemption status. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group I [Period Group I/Single Author]. Saccio, Boose, Crewe, Grene.

26. English Drama to 1642

05W: 2 06W: Arrange

A study of commercial theater in London from about 1570 until the closing of the theaters in 1642. Anonymous and collaborative plays will be read as well as those by such playwrights as Kyd, Marlowe, Dekker, Jonson, Webster, and Ford. The course will focus on the economic, social, political, intellectual, and theatrical conditions in which the plays were originally produced, on their continuing performance, and on their status as literary texts. Research into the performance history of a play or participation in a scene production is required. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group I [Period Group II]. Boose, Halasz.

27. The Seventeenth Century

05F, 06F: Arrange

English poetry and prose from 1603 to 1660. Primary focus on major lyric tradition including poems by John Donne, Ben Jonson, Mary Wroth, George Herbert, Andrew Marvell, Richard Crashaw, Henry Vaughan, and John Milton. Secondary focus on significant prose works of intellectual history (Francis Bacon, Robert Burton) and political controversy (debates about gender and/or political order). Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group I [Period Group II]. Luxon, Crewe.

28. Milton

05S: 2A 06S: Arrange

A study of most of Milton’s poetry and of important selections from his prose against the background of political and religious crises in seventeenth-century England. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group I [Period Group II/Single Author]. Luxon.

29. English Literature 1660-1714, Including Drama

Not offered in 2004-2005, may be offered in 2005-2006

A survey of English literary culture in the reigns of the later Stuart monarchs. Poetry by Dryden, Marvell, Rochester, Butler, Oldham and Pope; biographical writing by Aubrey, Halifax, Lucy Hutchinson, and Margaret Cavendish; the diaries of Pepys and Evelyn; spiritual autobiography and religious fiction by Bunyan; prose satires and analytical prose of Swift and Halifax. Within the survey there will be two areas of special attention: the theatre and the literary response to public events. We will read three plays by such authors as Dryden, Wycherley, Congreve, Lee, Behn, Shadwell, Otway and Farquahar, and study the writing in response to such events as the Great Plague and Fire of 1666, the Popish Plot, and the Exclusion Crisis. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group II [Period Group II]. Wykes.

30. Order and Disorder in British Neoclassicism

Not offered in 2004-2005, may be offered in 2005-2006

English literature from 1660 to 1789 is concerned with the problems of regulation and excess. The return to a traditional stability promised by the neoclassical aesthetic veils a threat from new dynamics in art and politics. The role of the imagination in life and art, ideals of political liberty, the emergence of women’s writing, all contribute to the underlying tensions. Readings will be chosen from among John Dryden, Jonathan Swift, Daniel Defoe, Alexander Pope, Mary Astell, Anne Finch, Frances Burney, Oliver Goldsmith, Samuel Johnson, William Cowper and George Crabbe. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group II [Period Group II]. Cosgrove.

31. Sensibility and the Self in Eighteenth-Century British Literature

04F: 10 05F: Arrange

The eighteenth century is a period of innovation in relation of self to society. From the Earl of Rochester to Robert Burns there is a shift from an exterior self determined by social status to an interior self defined by the perturbations of sensibility. Both male and female writers use literary models and the expansion of print technology to construct a less conventionalized self. Readings will include Aphra Behn, Alexander Pope, Jonathan Swift, Mary Wortley Montague, James Thomson, Mary Leapor, William Collins, Thomas Gray, Samuel Johnson, James Boswell, Olaudah Equiano. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group II [Period Group II]. Cosgrove.

32. The Rise of the Novel

Not offered in 2004-2005, may be offered in 2005-2006

A study of the eighteenth-century English novel, with emphasis on formal variations within the genre as well as on interrelations of formal, political, and psychological elements of the narratives. Reading may include works by Daniel Defoe, Eliza Haywood, Samuel Richardson, Henry Fielding, Tobias Smollett, Oliver Goldsmith, Frances Burney, and Elizabeth Inchbald, as well as twentieth-century criticism. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group II [Period Group II]. Cosgrove.

34. Romantic Literature: Writing and English Society, 1780-1832

05S: 10 06S: Arrange

This course offers a critical introduction to the literature produced in Britain at the time of the Industrial Revolution, the French Revolution, and the Napoleonic wars.There will be a strong emphasis throughout the course on the specific ways in which historical forces and social changes shape and are at times shaped by the formal features of literary texts. The question of whether romantic writing represents an active engagement with or an escapist idealization of the important historical developments in this period will be a continuous focus. Readings include works by Blake, Wordsworth, Helen Maria Williams, Edmund Burke, Thomas Paine, Mary Wollstonecraft, Robert Southey, Coleridge, Percy Shelley, Mary Shelley, Keats, and Clare. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group II [Period Group III]. Will.

36. Victorian Literature and Culture, 1837-1859

Not offered in 2004-2005, may be offered in 2005-2006

This course examines early Victorian poetry, prose and fiction in the context of cultural practices and social institutions of the time. We will locate cultural concerns among, for example, those of capitalism, political reform, scientific knowledge, nation and empire. And we will consider revisions of space, time, gender, sexuality, class, and public and private life that characterized formations of British identity during this period. Texts may include work by Charles Dickens, Thomas Carlyle, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Charlotte Bronte, John Ruskin, Charles Darwin. We will also read selections from recent criticism of Victorian culture. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group II [Period Group III]. Thomas.

37. Victorian Literature and Culture, 1860-1901

Not offered in 2004-2005, may be offered in 2005-2006

This course examines later nineteenth-century British poetry, prose and fiction in the context of cultural practices and social institutions of the time. We will locate cultural concerns among, for example, those of capitalism, political reform, scientific knowledge, nation and empire. And we will consider revisions of space, time, gender, sexuality, class, and public and private life that characterized formations of British identity during this period. Texts may include work by George Eliot, Matthew Arnold, Christina Rossetti, Algernon Swinburne, Thomas Hardy, Rudyard Kipling. We will also read selections from recent criticism of Victorian culture. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group II [Period Group III]. Thomas.

38. The Nineteenth-Century English Novel

05W: 12 06W: Arrange

A study of the nineteenth-century novel focussing on the Victorian novel’s representation of public and private categories of experience. Readings may include Shelley’s Frankenstein, Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights, Thackeray’s Vanity Fair, Dickens’ Bleak House, George Eliot’s Middlemarch, Mrs. Henry Wood’s East Lynne and Thomas Hardy’s The Return of the Native. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group II [Period Group III]. McKee.

39. Early American Literature

05S: 10A06S: Arrange

This course surveys the literature of the first settlers in the New World up to the American Revolution, focusing on writers in English and highlighting the major controversies that erupted during this period. We will focus on European attitudes towards and fantasies about the New World, how the settlers imagined masculinity and femininity, and represented indigenous and enslaved peoples. We will examine the frontier as a zone of intercultural contact, and look at the idea of “nationhood” that emerges from it. Some of the writers we will study are John Winthrop, Anne Bradstreet, Edward Taylor, Roger Williams, Cotton Mather, Mary Rowlandson, Jonathan Edwards, Mercy Otis Warren, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Abigail and John Adams, Judith Sargent Murray. This provides a foundation for English 40, 41, 42, 43. There are no prerequisites, but courses in early US history, or English 15 are highly recommended. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group I [Period Group II]. Schweitzer.

40. American Poetry

04F: 10A05F: Arrange

This course concentrates on the three major American poets writing in English before 1900: Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, and Herman Melville. The work of these three will preoccupy the readings, lectures, discussions, and examinations for the course. For their two required papers, however, students will choose poems by any two other Anglo-American writers of the period for close investigation. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group II [Period Group III]. Cook.

41. American Prose

04F: 1105F: Arrange

Readings of nonfiction narratives by such American writers as Franklin, Emerson, Thoreau, Henry Adams, Gertrude Stein, Hemingway, and Jack Kerouac. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group II [Period Group III]. Boggs, Renza.

42. American Fiction to 1900

05W: 1006W: Arrange

A survey of the first century of U.S. fiction, this course focuses on historical contexts as well as social and material conditions of the production of narrative as cultural myth. The course is designed to provide an overview of the literary history of the United States novel from the National Period to the threshold of the Modern (1845-1900). To do justice to the range of works under discussion, the lectures will call attention to the heterogeneous cultural contexts out of which these works have emerged as well as the formal and structural components of the different works under discussion. In keeping with this intention, the lectures include the so-called classic texts in American literature The Last of the Mohicans, Moby Dick, The Scarlet Letter, The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, but also the newly canonized Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, Life in the Iron Mills, Hope Leslie in the hope that the configuration of these works will result in an understanding of the remarkable complexity of United States literary culture. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group II [Period Group III]. Renza, Pease, Boggs.

43. Early Black American Literature (Identical to African and African American Studies 34)

Not offered in 2004-2005, may be offered in 2005-2006

A study of the foundations of Black American literature and thought, from the colonial period through the era of Booker T. Washington. The course will concentrate on the way in which developing Afro-American literature met the challenges posed successively by slavery, abolition, emancipation, and the struggle to determine directions for the twentieth century. Selections will include: Wheatley, Life and Works; Brown, Clotel; Douglass, Narrative; Washington, Up from Slavery; DuBois, Souls of Black Folk; Dunbar, Sport of the Gods; Chestnut, House Behind the Cedars; Harriet Wilson, Our Nig; Johnson, The Autobiography of an Ex-Coloured Man; and poems by F. W. Harper, Paul L. Dunbar and Ann Spencer. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group II [Period Group III]. Cook, Favor.

45. Native American Literature (Identical to, and described under, Native American Studies 35)

05S, 06S: 12

 Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Course Group III [Period Group IV]. Goeman.

46. (former 54). Twentieth-Century American Fiction: 1900 to World War II

06S: Arrange

A study of major American fiction in the first half of the twentieth century. Works by Dreiser, Stein, Fitzgerald, Cather, Larsen and Faulkner, and a changing list of others. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group III [Period Group IV]. Will.

47. (former 52) American Drama

05S, 06S: 10

A study of major American playwrights of the 19th and 20th centuries including S. Glaspell, O’Neill, Hellman, Wilder, Hansberry, Guare, Williams, Wilson, Mamet, Miller, Albee, Shepard, Wasserstein. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group III [Period Group IV]. Pease, Cook.

48. (former 55) Contemporary American Fiction

Not offered in 2004-2005, may be offered in 2005-2006

Contemporary American fiction introduces the reader to the unexpected. Instead of conventionally structured stories, stereotypical heroes, traditional value systems, and familiar uses of language, the reader finds new and diverse narrative forms. Such writers as Toni Morrison, Thomas Pynchon, Maxine Hong Kingston, Leslie Silko, Norman Mailer, Don DeLillo, and Ralph Ellison, among others, have produced a body of important, innovative fiction expressive of a modern American literary sensibility. The course requires intensive class reading of this fiction and varied critical writing on postmodernism. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group III [Period Group IV]. Favor.

49. (former 56) Modern Black American Literature (Identical to African and African American Studies 35)

05S: 11

A study of African American literature from the Harlem Renaissance to the present, this course will focus on emerging and diverging traditions of writing by African Americans. We shall also investigate the changing forms and contexts of ‘racial representation’ in the United States. Works may include those by Hurston, Hughes, Wright, Ellison, Morrison, Schuyler, West, Murray, Gates, Parks. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group III [Period Group IV]. Favor.

50. American and British Poetry Since 1914

Not offered in 2004-2005, may be offered in 2005-2006

A survey of modern American and British poetry since the First World War, with particular emphasis on the aesthetics, philosophy and politics of modernism. The course covers such canonical and non-canonical poets as Yeats, Pound, HD, Lawrence, Eliot, Stevens, Frost, Williams, Crane, Moore, Millay, Auden, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Beats. Dist: LIT; Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU or NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group III [Period Group IV]. Zeiger.

53. Twentieth-Century British Fiction: 1900 to World War II

06W: Arrange

A study of major authors, texts, and literary movements, with an emphasis on literary modernism and its cultural contexts. We will read works by Conrad, Forster, Joyce, Woolf, Lawrence, Rhys, and Beckett, as well as writers such as Kipling, Ford, West, Waugh, Bowen, and Lowry. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group III [Period Group IV]. Silver.

54. (former 51) Modern British Drama

05S: 206S: Arrange

Major British plays since the 1890s. The course begins with the comedy of manners as represented by Oscar Wilde and Noel Coward. It then considers innovations in and rebellions against standard theatrical fare: the socialist crusading of Bernard Shaw; the angry young men (John Osborne) and workingclass women (Shelagh Delaney) of the 1950s; the minimalists (Samuel Beckett, Harold Pinter) and the university wits (Tom Stoppard); the dark comedians of the modern family (Alan Ayckbourn) and the politically inflected play-wrights of the age of Prime Minister Thatcher (Caryl Churchill, Timberlake Wertenbaker, David Hare). The course deals both with the evolution of dramatic forms and the unusually close way in which modern British theatre has served a mirror for British life from the heyday of the Empire to the present. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group III [Period Group IV]. Saccio.

55. (former 57) Twentieth-Century British Fiction: World War II to the Present

05S: 1106S: Arrange

A study of the multiple currents within British fiction in a period characterized by major literary, cultural, and social transitions in Britain, including the emergence of a “post”(-war, -empire, -modern) sensibility. Writers may include Amis, Sillitoe, Greene, Golding, Burgess, Lessing, Wilson, Carter, Swift, Atkinson, MacLaverty, Ishiguro, Barker, Barnes, McKewan, Smith. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group III [Period Group IV]. Giri.

58. Introduction to Postcolonial Literature (Identical to African and African American Studies 65)

04F: 1105F: Arrange

An introduction to the themes and foundational texts of postcolonial literature in English. We will read and discuss novels by writers from former British colonies in Africa, South Asia, the Caribbean, and the postcolonial diaspora, with attention to the particularities of their diverse cultures and colonial histories. Our study of the literary texts will incorporate critical and theoretical essays, oral presentations, and brief background lectures. Authors may include Chinua Achebe, Ngugi wa Thiong’o, V.S. Naipaul, Merle Hodge, Anita Desai, Bessie Head, Nadine Gordimer, Paule Marshall, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Salman Rushdie, Earl Lovelace, Arundhati Roy. Serves as prerequisite for FSP in Trinidad. Dist: LIT or INT; WCult: NW. Course Group III [Period Group IV]. Giri.

59. Critical Issues in Postcolonial Studies

Not offered in 2004-2005, may be offered in 2005-2006

Intended for students who have some familiarity with postcolonial literary texts, this course will combine the reading of postcolonial literature with the study and discussion of the major questions confronting the developing field of postcolonial studies. Issues may include: questions of language and definition; the culture and politics of nationalism and transnationalism, race and representation, ethnicity and identity; the local and the global; tradition and modernity; hybridity and authenticity; colonial history, decolonization and neocolonialism; the role and status of postcolonial studies in the academy. Authors may include: Achebe, Appiah, Bhabha, Chatterjee, Coetzee, Fanon, Gilroy, Gordimer, James, JanMohamed, Minhha, Mohanty, Ngugi, Radhakrishnan, Rushdie, Said, Spivak, Sunder Rajan. Prerequisite: English 58, Trinidad FSP, or permission of the instructor. Dist: LIT or INT; WCult: NW. Course Group IV [Period Group IV].

SECTION III: SPECIAL TOPICS COURSES

60-69 Special Topics in English and American Literature

Note: For the class of 2006 and following, one course in the major must be a Special Topics course (60-69).

These courses are offered periodically with varying content: one or more individual writers, a genre, a period, or an approach to literature not otherwise provided in the English curriculum. Requirements will include papers and, at the discretion of the instructor, examinations. Enrollment is limited to 30. Courses numbered 65-67 require prior work in the period (normally a course in the corresponding course group) or permission of the instructor. Dist: LIT; WCult: Varies.

60. Open Topic

05W: 11, 2A05S: 2A

In 05W at 2A (section 3), Ruins, Ridicule and Resistance: An Introduction to Irish Literature. Moving from the early eighteenth century to the present day, this course follows three enduring strands in Irish literature: satire, elegy, and protest. We shall read some Gaelic poetry in translation, but concentrate on poems, plays, essays, and stories written in Irish varieties of English. Authors will include Brian Merriman, Eileen O’Leary, Yeats, Synge, Gregory, Joyce, O’Casey, Frank O’Connor, Mary Lavin, Friel, Heaney, Boland, Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill, Ciaran Carson, and Anon. Recommended for students considering the Dublin Foreign Study Program. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group II. Davies.

In 05W at 11 (section 6), Native American Oral Traditional Literature (identical to, and described under Native American Studies 34). Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Runnels.

In 05S at 2A (section 5), Gender and Sexuality in Asian American Literature. This course studies intersections of race, gender, sexuality and nation in Asian American literature. We will look at processes of identity formation and the ways in which difference and divergence are constructed in literature. We will interrogate such binaries as Asian/American, normal/deviant and assimilationist/feminist that have influenced Asian American studies. Among issues covered are “Oriental” sexualities, queerness and diasporic memory, feminist poetics and erotics. Texts studied in the course may include Louis Chu’s Eat a Bowl of Tea, Chitra Divakaruni’s Black Candle, Jessica Hagedorn’s Silent Movie, Ang Lee’s Wedding Banquet, Jana Monji’s Kim, Sandip Roy’s Curry Queens and Other Spices and Hisaye Yamamoto’s Seventeen Syllables. Dist: LIT; Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group III [Period Group IV]. Chin.

62. Gender/Literature/Culture

05S: 2

In 05S at 2 (section 1) Immigrant Women Writing in America (Identical to Women’s and Gender Studies 40). In responding to the obstacles facing America’s immigrants, women often assume special burdens and find themselves having to invent new roles. They often also bring powerful bicultural perspectives to a struggle for survival, social and economic justice, and cultural expression. We will read widely in new work on immigrancy, and across genres and national/cultural/religious groups, examining such writers as Danticat, Kincaid, Paley, Hong Kingston, Alvarez, Obejas, Hoffman, Song, Bersenbrugge. Dist: LIT; Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group III [Period Group IV]. Zeiger.

63. Topics in Theory and Criticism

04F: 1205W: 2A

In 04F at 12 (section 1), The Historical Novel. Though we strongly believe in a distinction between fact and fiction, much of our knowledge of history has been mediated through fiction. Indeed, some theorists claim that history writing itself is based on fictional forms. We will examine these issues through a mixture of history, theory and novels. The syllabus will include Ackroyd’s Hawksmoor, about an eighteenth-century architect, Donaghue’s Slammerkin, Johnson’s Middle Passage, about the Atlantic slave trade, and Vidal’s Burr, a wry look at the Founding Fathers. These works will allow us to test the theoretical positions of Hayden White, Anne Rigney and Frank Ankersmith. Dist: LIT. Course Group IV. Cosgrove.

In 05W at 2A (section 2), Critical Issues in English and American Literary Studies. Locating Meaning in a Text: Is it Possible? This course focuses on one of the major debates in twentieth-century literary criticism: how do we locate the meaning of a text? Are we relevant to an author’s intentions? By reading a variety of literary texts, including poetry, theoretical essays, short stories, a novel, a comic book autobiography and literary criticism, we come to terms with a range of critical positions on the issue of meaning that are current in literary study today. Authors include Propp, Brothers Grimm, Fish, Poe, Whitman, Dreiser, Spiegelman. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group IV [Period Group IV]. Siraganian.

65. Literature Before the Mid-Seventeenth Century

05W: 10A

In 05W at 10A (section 1), The Merchant of Venice: Jews and the Protestant Imagination. (Identical to Jewish Studies 40.) This course will offer a close examination of Shakespeare’s construction of “Jewishness” in the context of a larger review of Jewish history in medieval and early modern Europe. Dist: LIT; Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group 1 [Period Group II, Single Author]. Luxon and Heschel.

66. Literature from the Mid-Seventeenth Century to the End of the Nineteenth Century

05W: 1005S: 10, 2A

In 05W at 10 (section 1), Colonialism and 18th Century British Literature. We will read and analyze contemporary writings of this period for their relation to the ideology of colonialism, mostly concerning the role of the Caribbean in English literary consciousness, as well as the importance of the cultural exchanges over the Black Atlantic with some discussion of the Somerset Case. Readings will include Behn’s Oronoko, the letters of Ignatius Sanchez, Olaudah Equiano’s Life, and John Stedman’s History of a Slave Rebellion in Surinamt. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group II [Period Group II]. Cosgrove.

In 05S at 2A (section 3), The Victorian Novel and the City. This course will consider how Victorian fiction responded to, was shaped by, and also shaped urban experience, as well as cultural perspectives on urban experience, in nineteenth-century Britain. Study will focus on how London and, more briefly, Manchester are represented as sociological, physical, and psychological presences in fiction, as well as on formal aspects of the novel that may have appeared because of urban experience. Reading will include such novels as Dickens’s Great Expectations, Gaskell’s North and South, Collins’s The Woman in White, and Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes stories, as well as excerpts from the work of Victorian critics of London life such as John Ruskin and Henry Mayhew. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group II [Period Group II]. McKee.

In 05S at 10 (section 4), Dickens and Fictional Autobiography. Charles Dickens failed when he tried to write an autobiography, but the fragment he left, on his childhood, is very revealing. He three times told the story of the Lost Boy, a wronged waif providentially saved from people and circumstances intent on denying or stealing his birthright of superiority and distinction. The three versions of this myth are the early Oliver Twist, his openly autobiographical novel David Copperfield, and the later Great Expectations (where the myth of the Lost Boy comes in for a brilliantly ironic re-examination). We shall read these novels as Dickens’s particular form of autobiographical fiction, and follow his efforts to embody and redefine his personal obsessive myth through them. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group II [Period Group II, Single Author]. Wykes.

67. Literature from the Start of the Twentieth Century to the Present

04F: 2A05W: 12, 2A05S: 10A, 11

In 04F at 2A (section 2), Modernism, Modernity and Realism in 20th Century British Literature. This course focuses on High Modernism, but also on the realism that both pre- and post-dates it. Most 20th century British and related literature is not Modernist. What was Modernism about? Where did it come from? What is its relation to modernity? Primary readings will include: Conrad, Heart of Darkness; Yeats, Selected Poems; Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man; Lawrence, The Rainbow; T.S. Eliot, Selected Poems; Woolf, To the Lighthouse; Orwell, Selected Essays, 1984; Waugh, A Handful of Dust; Beckett, Godot; Pinter, The Birthday Party; Larkin, Selected Poems. Secondary texts include Nietzsche, Ortega y Gasset, and Freud. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group III [Period Group IV]. Grant.

In 05W at 2A (section 3), Virginia Woolf: Theory and Practice. In this course we will read a number of works by Virginia Woolf, including experimental short stories, essays about language and literature, polemical writings, and novels. We will also read essays written in the early 20th century that are associated with the Modernist movement, as well as critical and theoretical essays about Woolf’s work. Prerequisites include at least one course on 20th century fiction and, preferably, a course on literary theory. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group III [Period Group IV/ Single Author]. Silver.

In 05W at 12 (section 5), Native Cultural Production: (Re)Mapping Race, Gender, and Nation (Identical to Native American Studies 30). This class examines the ways that important issues in indigenous communities are reflected in twentieth-century creative works by using literary analytical tools in exploring metaphor, poetic structures, and genres. The relationship between race, gender, and nation will be explicated through an examination of various forms of expression. We will begin with Native literature at the turn of the century, which addresses the trope of the frontier and the push westward, and end with current indigenous work that comments on global restructuring. We will engage in discussions about methods of mapping diverse and sovereign spaces. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW. Course Group III [Period Group IV]. Goeman.

In 05S at 10A (section 4), Contemporary American Poetry. This course concentrates on American poetry since 1960. We will consider the influence of the “schools” of poetry which evolved in the second half of the twentieth century, including the Beats, the New York poets, the Confessional poets, the Black Mountain School, the New Romantics, and the New Formalists. Our primary focus will be to examine a variety of poets through close readings of individual poems. Paying close attention to the crafting of the poem, we will discuss key aspects such as voice, tone, image, metaphor, and the nature of the line. Poets we will study include Ginsberg, Lowell, O’Hara, Bishop, Plath, Kunitz, Hayden, James Wright, Brooks, Levine, Levertov, and Rich. Creative Writing majors are encouraged to take this course. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group III [Period Group IV]. Mathis.

In 05S at 11 (section 5), Jews in American Culture and Theory: The New York Intellectuals (Identical to and described under Jewish Studies 30). Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later, WCult: W. Course Group III, Period Group IV. Milich.

SECTION IV: ADVANCED SEMINARS

Seminars are designed as small courses, limited to twelve students, primarily seniors; qualified juniors may enroll. These courses emphasize discussion, and allow the student to develop his or her thinking about a subject throughout the term. Though assignments vary according to the nature of the material being studied, seminars usually involve class presentations and a term paper. They fulfill the “Culminating Experience” requirement. Prerequisite for the class of 2004 and later: at least four completed major courses, of which one must be in the same period group as the seminar. Students who successfully complete a seminar may sometimes be allowed to follow it with a one-term Honors project (see the section on Honors, above). Dist: LIT; WCult: Varies

70. Literature Before the Mid-Seventeenth Century

04F: 205W: 2A05S: 10A

In 04F at 2 (section 1), Spenser: Poetry, Myth, Nation. We will read Spenser’s pastoral poem, The Shepheardes Calendar, his epic poem, The Faerie Queene, and his prose treatise, A View of the Present State of Ireland, as well as selections from his minor poems. Our discussion will take its cues from the intersections and boundaries between recent critical work on Spenser’s twenty years as a colonial servant of the English Crown in Ireland and an older critical tradition that reads Spenser as “our new Poet” in a lineage that includes Virgil and Ovid as well as Chaucer. Intense, fascinating reading, several short papers, one of which will be revised and expanded into a longer paper. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group I [Period Group I, Single Author]. Halasz.

In 05W at 2A (section 2), The Story of Troilus and Cressida: 1160-1650. This course will chart the evolution of the Troilus and Cressida story over a period of roughly five hundred years, with particular attention paid to its Chaucerian iteration. Asking ourselves why this particular story and its characters have been revived so often, we will explore such topics as literary inheritance and tradition, the symbolic interment and exhumation of “dead” characters, the ethics of translation, and the use of the past in the construction of the present. Primary readings in Chaucer, Boccaccio, Robert Henryson, and Shakespeare, among others. Theoretical readings in Lacan and Zizek. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W, pending faculty approval. Course Group I [Period Group I]. Edmondson.

In 05S at 10A (section 3), Elizabethan Romance. What is Elizabethan Romance? Why was it so popular and important during the reign of Elizabeth I, and why did it continue to be popular? What were its origins in classical literature, and what did it contribute to the development of English prose fiction? How did prose romance cross over to the English stage, getting taken up by Shakespeare among others? How did romance function—and entertain—in the cultural and political world of Elizabethan England? To answer these questions and more, we will read works by authors including Shakespeare, Philip Sidney (Arcadia), Edmund Spenser (The Faerie Queene), and Robert Greene. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group I [Period Group I]. Crewe.

71. Literature from the Mid-Seventeenth Century to the End of the Nineteenth Century

05W: 10A, 3A

In 05W at 3A (section 1), Moby Dick and the Invisible. The participants in the Melville- Ellison Seminar will analyze Herman Melville’s Moby Dick and Ralph Ellison’s The Invisible Man within the context of the American Renaissance paradigm in which both works attained canonical status. The seminar will involve its participants in a comparative analysis of these works and a critical analysis of the paradigm in which they were valorized. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group II. [Period Group III]. Pease.

In 05W at 10A (section 2), Victorians in Italy. In this course we will study the importance of Italy, especially Venice, to Victorian aesthetics and Victorian culture. Focusing on the work of writers such as John Ruskin, Robert Browning, and Henry James, as well as of painters such as James McNeill Whistler, we will examine Anglo-American myths about Venice as well as effects of tourism on the city. Reading will include Ruskin’s The Stones of Venice, James’s The Aspern Papers, Norwich’s Paradise of Cities, and Venice: The Tourist Maze by David and Martin. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group II [Period Group II]. McKee.

72. Literature from the Start of the Twentieth Century to the Present

04F: 11, 2A, Arrange05W: 10A05S: 10A, 2A

In 04F at 11 (section 1), Neither Harmonious nor Homogeneous: African American Fiction and Criticism in the 1990s (Identical to African and African American Studies 92). While always having been a literature encompassing a broad range styles, subjects, ideologies and aesthetics, African American fiction has—in recent years—become more visibly multifaceted. At the same time, critical and theoretical approaches to African American literature have deepened and complicated the question: “What is Black fiction?” This course will explore African American prose fiction published since 1990 in an effort to understand its current position in various communities and academies. We shall also read extensively in African American criticism and theory with an eye toward learning how they have shaped the canon of African American literature and how well critical paradigms of African American writing and identity frame, describe and analyze diversity within the broad fields of African American and American literary production. Dist: LIT; Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group III [Period Group IV]. Favor.

In 04F, arrange (section 2), The Poetry of Elizabeth Bishop. Elizabeth Bishop writes that “The headgear of the other sex/Invites us to experiment,” and her poetry is marked by inquiries into other identities, spaces and boundaries. Yet Bishop’s exploratory playfulness also indicates her alienations. As orphan, woman poet, lesbian, and long-term expatriate in Brazil, she is always an outsider; her work both resists and invites queer, feminist, and post-colonial criticism. We will read widely in this literature, as well as all of Bishop’s poetry and prose. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: NA. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group III [Period Group IV, Single Author]. Zeiger.

In 04F at 2A (section 3), William Butler Yeats. This course offers an opportunity for reading Yeats’s poems closely with due attention to the contexts that conditioned them. We will make our way through the Collected Poems looking at one or two books at a time, looking at the relevant background of the individual book with prescribed reading of related materials — essays, plays, memoirs, critical interpretation — then at individual poems. Class presentations will be required; each student will also have to submit one shorter (2000 word) and one longer (5000 word) paper. There will be no final exam. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group III [Period Group III, Single Author]. Grene.

In 05W at 10A (section 4), James Joyce. This seminar will be devoted to the study of Joyce’s Ulysses. After some discussion of Joyce’s Portrait and Dubliners—both of which students are urged to read before the course begins—we will focus on the text of Joyce’s Ulysses, with an emphasis on close reading and an examination of Joyce’s experiments in prose and his place in modern literature. Each student will be asked to write two papers. Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Course Group III [Period Group IV, Single Author]. Huntington.

In 05W at 10A (section 5), Postmodern Fiction: Boxes, Labyrinths and Webs. This seminar will explore that strand of postmodern fiction—non-sequential, multilinear, interactive—that has led to the recent genre of electronic hyperfiction. Readings include print fictions by writers whose novels anticipate or parallel the experiments in non-sequential narrative made possible by the computer; a wide variety of electronic hyperfictions; and critical and theoretical essays. Print authors include Borges, Coover, Pynchon, Stein, Coetzee; hyperfiction writers include Joyce, Malloy, Jackson, Amerika, Talan. We will also explore the vibrant world of multi-media web fiction/art. Preference will be given to students who have taken courses in 20th century fiction and/or literary theory. Dist: LIT. Course Group III [Period Group IV]. Silver.

In 05S at 10A (section 6), The Autobiographical Impulse in Asian American Literature. This course studies expressions of the autobiographical impulse in such diverse forms as memoirs, poems, short stories and performance pieces. We will consider issues of self-representation and referentiality as well as questions raised by the writer Frank Chin concerning the genealogy and “authenticity” of autobiography for Asian Americans. Authors studied may include Carlos Bulosan, Frank Chin, Le-Ly Hayslip, Maxine Hong Kingston, Shishir Kurup, Kyoko Mori and Yung Wing. Dist: LIT. Course Group III [Period Group IV]. Chin.

In 05S at 2A (section 7), Contemporary Experimental Fiction: From Burroughs’ Naked Lunch to Satrapi’s Persepolis. What does avant-garde writing look like today? What makes writing postmodern? How do Jane Austen’s or Stephen King’s novels differ from post-modern novels? This course explores these questions with recent examples of innovative fiction, such as Colson Whitehead’s The Intuitionist, Kathy Acker’s Empire of the Senseless, and Richard Powers’ Galatea 2.2. We study postmodern texts such as William Burroughs’ Naked Lunch, Don DeLillo’s White Noise, and Art Spiegelman’s Maus. Focusing primarily on recent American fiction, the course also examines writing by Italo Calvino, Jorge Luis Borges, Theresa Hak Kyung Cha and Marjane Satrapi. Recommended prerequisite: English 15. Dist: LIT. Course Group III [Period Group IV]. Siraganian.

74. Open Topic

Not offered in 2004-2005, may be offered in 2005-2006

75. Seminar in Criticism and Theory

Not offered in 2004-2005, may be offered in 2005-2006

SECTION V: CREATIVE WRITING

Students who wish to enroll in a Creative Writing Course should pick up the appropriate “How to Apply...” form from the English Department and answer all the questions asked in a cover letter. They should also submit a five-eight page writing sample, as stated in each of the course descriptions below. This must be delivered to the administrative assistant of the English Department by the last day of the term preceding the term for which they wish to enroll. The student should then register for three other courses, not including the Creative Writing course. If the student is accepted into Creative Writing, they will be notified on or before the first day of class. To secure their spot in the class, the student must be present at the first meeting. At that time they will be given a permission card and can then drop one of their other courses and enroll for the Creative Writing course.

80. Creative Writing

All terms: Arrange

This course offers a workshop in fiction and poetry. Seminar-sized classes meet twice a week plus individual conferences. Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors, and to first- year students who have completed their seminar. Students will be admitted on a competitive basis. Please pick up the “How To Apply To English 80” form from the English Department and answer all of the questions asked in a cover letter. Students should submit a five-eight page writing sample of poetry and/or fiction to the administrative assistant of the English Department by the last day of the term preceding the term in which they wish to enroll. English 80 is the prerequisite to all other Creative Writing courses. It does not carry major or minor credit. Dist: ART. Hebert, Huntington, Mathis, Dimmick, Lenhart, Sleigh.

81. Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry

05W, 06W: Arrange

Continued work in the writing of poetry, focusing on the development of craft, image, and voice, as well as the process of revision. The class proceeds by means of group workshops on student writing, individual conferences with the instructor, and analysis of poems by contemporary writers.

Prerequisite: English 80 and permission of the instructor. Please pick up the “How To Apply To English 81, 82 or 83” form from the English Department and answer all of the questions asked in a cover letter. Students should submit a five-eight page writing sample of their poetry to the administrative assistant of the English Department by the last day of the term preceding the term in which they wish to enroll. Dist: ART. Mathis, Sleigh, Huntington.

82. Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction

05W, 05S: Arrange

Continued work in the writing of fiction, focusing on short stories, although students may experiment with the novel. The class proceeds by means of group workshops on student writing, individual conferences with the instructor, and analysis of short stories by contemporary writers. Constant revision is required.

Prerequisite: English 80 and permission of the instructor. Please pick up the “How To Apply To English 81, 82 or 83” form from the English Department and answer all of the questions asked in a cover letter. Students should submit a five-eight page writing sample of their fiction to the administrative assistant of the English Department by the last day of the term preceding the term in which they wish to enroll. Dist: ART. Hebert, Dimmick.

83. Advanced Creative Writing: Literary Non-Fiction

Not offered in 2004-2005, may be offered in 2005-2006

This course offers students training in the writing of literary nonfiction. The class proceeds by means of group workshops on student writing, individual conferences with the instructor, and analysis of work by contemporary writers.

Prerequisite: English 80 and permission of the instructor. Please pick up the “How To Apply To English 81, 82 or 83” form from the English Department and answer all of the questions asked in a cover letter. Students should submit a five-eight page writing sample of their non-fiction to the administrative assistant of the English Department by the last day of the term preceding the term in which they wish to enroll. Dist: ART. Osborne.

85. Senior Workshop in Poetry and Prose Fiction

04F, 05F: Arrange

This course is to be taken by Creative Writing majors in the fall of their senior year. Each student will undertake a manuscript of poems, short fiction, or literary non-fiction. While all Creative Writing majors are guaranteed a spot in English 85, they must nonetheless submit a five-to-eight page writing sample to the administrative assistant of the English Department by the last day of the spring term preceding their senior year. Please also pick up the “How To Apply To English 85” form from the English Department and answer all of the questions asked in a cover letter.

Prerequisite: English 80 and 81, 82, or 83. Students who are not Creative Writing majors may be admitted by permission of the Creative Writing staff. Dist: ART. Dimmick, Hebert, Huntington.

SECTION VI: FOREIGN STUDY COURSES

90. English Study Abroad I

Major credit for this course is awarded to students who satisfactorily complete a course of study elected as part of one of the Department’s three Foreign Study Programs (FSPs). On the Glasgow FSP, this will be a course of study in literature at the University of Glasgow. On the Trinidad FSP, this will be a course of study in literature at the University of the West Indies. On the Dublin FSP, this will be a course of study in the English Department at Trinity College Dublin (TCD). Of the three courses at TCD at least one must be in Irish literature. Students are also required to do an independent study project on some aspect of Irish literature or culture, culminating in a long essay; the grade for the independent study is factored into the grade for the Irish literature course.

Glasgow and Dublin Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Trinidad Dist: LIT; WCult: NW.

91. English Study Abroad II

Major credit for this course is awarded to students who satisfactorily complete a course of study elected as part of one of the Department’s three Foreign Study Programs (FSPs). On the Glasgow FSP, this will be a course of study in literature at the University of Glasgow. On the Trinidad FSP, this will be a course of study in literature at the University of the West Indies. On the Dublin FSP, this will be a course of study in the English Department at Trinity College Dublin (TCD). Of the three courses at TCD at least one must be in Irish literature. Students are also required to do an independent study project on some aspect of Irish literature or culture, culminating in a long essay; the grade for the independent study is factored into the grade for the Irish literature course.

Glasgow and Dublin Dist: LIT. Class of 2007 and earlier: WCult: EU. Class of 2008 and later: WCult: W. Trinidad Dist: LIT; WCult: NW.

92. English Study Abroad III

One college credit (not major or minor credit) for this course is awarded to students who satisfactorily complete a course of study elected as part of one of the Department’s three Foreign Study Programs (FSPs). On the Glasgow FSP, this will be a non-preprofessional course of study of any kind offered at the University of Glasgow. On the Trinidad FSP, this will be a course of study in West Indian history and culture. On the Dublin FSP, this will be a course of study in the English Department at Trinity College Dublin (TCD). Of the three courses at TCD at least one must be in Irish literature. Students are also required to do an independent study project on some aspect of Irish literature or culture, culminating in a long essay; the grade for the independent study is factored into the grade for the Irish literature course.

Glasgow Dist: Varies; Trinidad Dist: INT or SOC; Dublin Dist: LIT.

SECTION VII: INDEPENDENT STUDY AND HONORS

96. Reading Course

All terms: Arrange

A tutorial course to be designed by the student with the assistance of a member of the English Department willing to supervise it. This course is available, as an occasional privilege, to upperclassmen who have demonstrated their ability to do independent work. During the term prior to taking the course, applicants must consult Professor Zeiger to make arrangements for approval of the project.

(Note: English 96 does not normally count towards the English major or minor, though in special circumstances the C.D.C. may approve occasional exceptions to that rule. Students seeking such an exception are asked to petition the C.D.C. before taking English 96. English 96 may not be used to satisfy course group requirements.

97. Creative Writing Project

All terms: Arrange

A tutorial course to be designed by the student with the assistance of a member of the Creative Writing Faculty willing to supervise it. This course is intended for the purpose of producing a significant manuscript of fiction, nonfiction or poetry. It carries major credit only for creative writing majors. Creative Writing majors must request permission to undertake English 97 (one term) during fall of senior year when they are enrolled in English 85. Decisions regarding admission to English 97 will not be made before fall term of senior year.

Prerequisite: English 85, and permission of the Director of Creative Writing.

98. Honors Course

All terms: Arrange

Independent study under the direction of a faculty adviser. Honors majors will elect this course in each term in which they are pursuing Honors projects. For more information, see “English Honors Program,” above, and consult the “Guide to Honors” booklet available in the English Department.