Baker-Berry: Past Exhibits

The Montgomery Fellows Program at Dartmouth College 40th Anniversary

2018 Montgomery Fellows exhibit poster

For nearly four decades, the Montgomery Endowment, created by a gift from Kenneth ’25 and Harle Montgomery, has brought distinguished guests to campus to live, work, teach, and engage with the Dartmouth community. The Endowment’s mission is to bring outstanding luminaries from the academic world as well as from non-academic spheres to campus.

Over the past four decades, the Montgomery Endowment has hosted more than 230 distinguished fellows, many of whom came back a second or even a third time. During their residencies, the fellows visit classes, meet with faculty and students, and give public lectures.

The Montgomery Fellows Program has reached out across the disciplines and beyond academic life, installing on campus playwrights and film directors, novelists, musicians, scientists, politicians, and journalists. Designated lifelong “Montgomery Fellows,” these distinguished individuals are in Hanover for varying lengths of time, ranging from a few days up to a full term. During their incumbencies, the fellows and their families inhabit the Montgomery House, a comfortable and gracious residence adjacent to campus and overlooking Occom Pond.

Exhibit curated by Klaus Milich, Director of the Montgomery Fellows Program; designed by Dennis Grady, Library Education & Outreach.

Baker-Berry Library, Berry Main Street: July 26 - September 21, 2018



Student Library Service Bookplate Program - Dartmouth Class of 2018

2018 Student Bookplate exhibit poster

The Student Library Service Bookplate Program honors the Library’s graduating student employees by inviting them to choose books and other items for the Library’s collections. Each item will receive a bookplate that acknowledges the student’s selection and honors his or her service to the Library. Students are eligible if they worked at least two terms in any Library department (including RWIT, The Student Center for Research, Writing and Information Technology). The Library will honor nearly fifty students from the class of 2018 with selections ranging from world fiction, poetry, cookbooks, and DVDs to children’s books, inspirational works, and historical scholarship.

This year's featured students are Kalei Akau • Abbey Cahill • Riley Carbone • Jacob Cutler Palden Flynn • Sofia Greimel-Garza • Taringana Guranungo Mary Liza Hartong • Charlotte Johnstone • Rachael Jones Precious Kilimo • Jessica Lu • Yen Truong

Exhibit design and photography by Dennis Grady, Library Education & Outreach. Many thanks to the students who volunteered to participate in this exhibit, and to: Richard Langdell, Library Services Specialist; Tim Wolfe, Acquisitions Services Supervisor; and Goodie Corriveau, Acquisitions Assistant.

Baker-Berry Library, Baker Main Hall: June 8 - August 31, 2018



I WILL TELL YOU THE TRUTH ABOUT A MAN’S LIFE: The Mario Puzo Papers

Coconut Crabs exhibit poster

Last summer, the Dartmouth College Library got an offer it couldn’t refuse: a gift of the archives of Mario Puzo, novelist, screenwriter and the creator of The Godfather, the book and movie that spawned the modern myth of the mafia. Thanks to the generosity of the donors, Diana and Bruce Rauner ’78, the collection is now placed in Rauner Special Collections Library where it will be used to support research and to enhance the classroom experience of Dartmouth students. It holds so much promise. The collection documents Puzo’s initial struggles and remarkable rise, catalogs his foibles and personal insecurities, and comments on the writing profession in the 20th century. But most importantly, it shows the creation and development of the dominant popular conception of the mob in America—seemingly, every mafia cliché has its origins in these papers. As we said, it was an offer we couldn’t refuse.

This exhibit was made possible through the generosity of Diana and Bruce Rauner. It was curated by Hazel-Dawn Dumpert; designed by Dennis Grady, Library Education & Outreach; with assistance from Veronica Cook Williamson, Jones Memorial Digital Media Fellow; Deborah Howe, Collections Conservator; Lizzie Curran, Assistant Conservator; and Elena Cordova, Special Collections Processing Specialist.

Baker-Berry Library, Berry Main Street: April 5 - June 30, 2018



Will Carter and the Dartmouth Typeface

Will Carter exhibit poster

The story of the development of the letterforms that became known as the Dartmouth typeface

In the early 1960s, Will Carter carved a series of inscriptions on teak panels for the college. Those letters, in their different iterations over the years, became known as the Dartmouth typeface. This is the story behind the chronology and the people involved in the development of that typeface.

Curated by Won K. Chung. Special thanks to Sebastian Carter, Martha Scotford, John R. Nash, Holly Nash Wolff, Jay Satterfield, director of Rauner Special Collections Library, and Dennis Grady, exhibits designer with Library Education & Outreach. Exhibit title set in Letraset version of Dartmouth; all other text set in Octavian. Dartmouth typeface copyrighted by Rampant Lions Press. Exhibit text and captions copyright by Won K. Chung.

Baker-Berry Library, Baker Main Hall: February 9 - June 1, 2018

In conjunction with this exhibit, The Friends of the Dartmouth Library cordially invite you to the 2018 Stephen Harvard Memorial Lecture: In Defense of the Roman Letter, delivered by John R. Nash ’60, calligrapher, stone letter-carver, and a Fellow of the Society of Scribes and Illuminators, London, England.

Thursday, April 19, 2018 at 4:30 pm, East Reading Room, Baker Library

Reception to follow
Events are free and open to the public.



The Coconut Crab - Biology, Art, Conservation, and Darwin

Coconut Crabs exhibit poster

This exhibit covers the ABCs (actually the ABCDs—Art-Biology-Conservation-Darwin) of coconut crabs. You can see original editions of Charles Darwin’s writings on coconut crabs, as well as natural history pictures, preserved specimens, and other biological materials that were brought back by Mark Laidre after a study of coconut crabs from January to March 2016 on earth’s largest coral atoll, Chagos Archipelago. Following this scientific study, many of Mark’s artist friends were inspired to produce beautiful artwork, which is prominently displayed in this exhibit to celebrate coconut crabs.

The exhibit includes artworks and writings by Sophia Budny, Rosemary Feit Covey, Robert DuGrenier, Sam Gochman, Vernon de Guzman,  Keyan Kaplan, Alex Lamb, Tracy Punshon, Holly Shaffer, and Sarah Smith.

Curated by Mark Laidre, Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences.

Exhibit design by Dennis Grady, Library Education & Outreach     

Baker-Berry Library, Berry Main Street: January 10 - March 29, 2018



Dimensions of Open

Open Access exhibit poster

Dimensions of Open is inspired by the efforts of Dartmouth authors, creators, artists, and inventors to make the results of their work openly and publicly available. The work of Dartmouth scholars and researchers is often in collaboration with authors across the globe, and immediate access to that work has a significant global impact. This exhibit reveals the complex issues surrounding open information through six dimensions: global, political, financial, workforce, technological, and future.

Special thanks to those who made this exhibit possible: 
Content Creation: Barbara DeFelice and Jen Green: Scholarly Communication, Copyright, and Publishing Program; Pamela Bagley, Laura Braunstein, Barbara DeFelice, Monica Erives, Jen Green, Janifer Holt, and Lora Leligdon: The Open Dartmouth Working Group; Exhibit Design: Dennis Grady: Education & Outreach; Data Visualizations: James Adams: Research and Instruction Services; Editorial Review: Laura Barrett: Education and Outreach.

Baker-Berry Library, Baker Main Hall: October 16, 2017 - January 26, 2018



Partnering for a Better World: The Matariki Network of Universities

Matariki exhibit poster

The Matariki Network of Universities is an international consortium of seven leading universities on three continents and in seven countries. It was established in 2010 to create new opportunities for collaboration in research and education, to foster faculty, student and staff exchange, create a forum for sharing best practices, and to promote local and global social responsibility . Matariki members are critical friends and trusted partners.

Matariki is the Māori name for the Pleiades star cluster, also known as the Seven Sisters. Matariki is also the word for the Māori New Year, which marks the rise of Matariki and the sighting of the new moon. 

The creation of the Matariki Network of Universities was inspired by the Pleiades, and represents the relationship between, and collaboration among, seven of the world’s leading universities.

Matariki member institutions include Dartmouth (United States), Durham (United Kingdom), Queen’s (Canada), Uppsala (Sweden), Tübingen (Germany), the University of Western Australia, and the University of Otago (New Zealand).

Exhibit offered in conjunction with Annual Meeting of the Matariki Network Executive Board at Dartmouth College, October 2017.

Curated by Laurel Stavis, Assistant Provost for Academic Initiatives and Jennifer Taxman, Associate Librarian for Research and Learning.
Exhibit design by Dennis Grady, Library Education & Outreach

Poster illustration: Rickeeta Walley, Matariki (Marr-Kudjil Djookan Jinda) The Seven Sisters. Acrylic on canvas, 2016.     

Baker-Berry Library, Berry Main Street: August 14 - November 30, 2017



Student Library Service Bookplate Program: Dartmouth Class of 2017

Student Bookplate exhibit poster

The Student Library Service Bookplate Program honors graduating student library employees by inviting them to choose books and other items for the Library’s collections. Each item will include a bookplate acknowledging the student’s selection and recognizing his or her service to the Library. Students are eligible if they worked at least two terms in any Library department, including the Student Center for Research, Writing and Information Technology (RWIT). This year Dartmouth College Library honors almost forty students from the Class of 2017 with selections including works of fiction, musical CDs, and classic works of the cartoon arts to a musical score and a history of makeup.

Each year the Library invites graduating student library employees to paricipate in an exhibit about the program. This year's participants are Beverly Alomepe, Reem Chamseddine, Eliza Grainger, Whitney Martin, Josefina Ruiz, Priyanka Sivaramakrishnan, Alexa Sonnenfeld, Fabian Štoček, Veronica Williamson, and Ran Zhuo.

Exhibit design and photography by Dennis Grady, Library Education & Outreach. Many thanks to the students who volunteered to participate in this exhibit and to: Wendel Cox, Librarian for History & English; Greg Potter, Research and Information Desk Coordinator; and Goodie Corriveau, Acquisitions Assistant.

Baker-Berry Library, Baker Main Hall: June 9 - August 30, 2017



Protest! at Dartmouth

Protest! at Dartmouth exhibit poster

College campuses have a long history as sites of activism and protest. It’s a truth acknowledged easily enough by today’s students, who have witnessed and in some cases participated in current movements like Black Lives Matter, #NoDAPL, and the Women’s March on Washington, among numerous others. What may be less apparent is the role the college plays when the activism dust settles.

At Dartmouth, the archivists of Rauner Special Collections Library are committed to recording the College’s history—the history of many years ago and the history of yesterday—through primary source documents. Campus activism is a significant part of this history, and one of the most effective ways of capturing it is via first-person narrative.

Oral history is an interview-based approach to documenting the past, centering around an in-depth, recorded conversation between two people: the oral historian and an individual who experienced a particular event, era, or culture firsthand. Because of its emphasis on non-dominant perspectives and marginalized voices, oral history is uniquely situated among history methodologies to document moments of protest and dissent. It is, at its heart, a means of telling stories that might otherwise have gone untold.

This exhibit explores three protest movements in Dartmouth’s past, and a selection of oral history interviews with individuals who experienced them. These interviews and many more are available at Rauner Special Collections Library.

Exhibit curated by Caitlin Birch, Digital Collections and Oral History Archivist, and designed by Dennis Grady, Library Education & Outreach. 

Baker-Berry Library, Berry Main Street: May 1 - July  30, 2017



Zircons, Chrysoberyls, Tourmalines, and Opals - Jewelry Design Books of Jaques and Marcus 1890-1926

Marcus exhibit poster

The Jaques & Marcus jewelry firm, later Marcus & Company, was established in New York City in 1892 by Herman Marcus and his son William shortly after they immigrated from Germany. Herman Marcus, a skilled jeweler trained in traditional plique-à-jour enameling techniques, quickly became a widely-known and respected designer. Marcus’s affinity for using semi-precious and uncommon gems was central to his jewelry designs.

The firm was bought by a larger company after World War II and eventually dissolved by the 1960s, but the prominence of Marcus & Co. in its prime was equal to that of Tiffany & Co.

The Art Nouveau movement, which began in Europe, reached the shores of the United States due to the popularity of designers like Tiffany and Marcus. This artistic movement was a reaction to the Industrial Revolution and the rise of factory-made goods that lacked the unique quality of handmade objects and the asymmetry of the natural world. In Art Nouveau, the utilitarian gave way to the ornate. Artists and craftsmen in the graphic and decorative arts incorporated botanical elements and flowing lines to elevate everyday objects into works of art.

The original designs made by artists at Marcus & Co. at the turn of the 20th century were compiled into eight albums for the firm’s archives. Burton Elliot ’48 donated these albums to Dartmouth College in 1987, and they served as inspiration in Dartmouth’s Donald Claflin Jewelry Studio for many years. Each delicate drawing and intricate painting portrays a custom piece designed by the firm. The drawings are exquisite examples of Art Nouveau style and each stands as a small masterpiece in itself. 

The Metropolitan Museum of Art recently requested the albums be digitized in preparation for the Met’s upcoming museum-wide exhibit on jewelry. First, the albums were stabilized so they could be transported and opened for imaging without risking damage. Conservation staff cleaned the albums of accumulated soot, created new spines out of archival materials, and mended torn pages. With generous support from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the albums were then transported to the Northeast Document Conservation Center to be photographed and digitized. The images displayed here are select examples from the eight volume set, which can be viewed in its entirety in Rauner Special Collections Library.

Exhibit curated by Lizzie Curran, Assistant Library Conservator, and designed by Dennis Grady, Library Education & Outreach. 

Baker-Berry Library, Baker Main Hall: April 14 - June 2, 2017



"...a long, long way to go..."

Gibbs Fund exhibit poster

The Gibbs Memorial Book Fund and African American Studies at Dartmouth

The Duane Gibbs '76 and William Rice '76 Memorial Book fund is one of many funds in the Library that memorializes Dartmouth's alumni. This particular fund is for the acquisition of books, journals, and reference materials by African American authors. The fund was originally established in 1989 by Reginald Thomas '75, P'10, William Rice '76, P'19, and Gary Love '76, P'10 in honor of their dear friend Duane Gibbs '76, who died that same year. Rice's name was added to the fund after his death in 2016 to memorialize his devotion to his friend Duane and to his alma mater Dartmouth.

The 40th anniversary of Gibbs's, Rice's, and their friends' graduation provides the opportunity to explore the African American educational experience at Dartmouth in and around 1976. This exhibit explores the development of the African and African American Studies Program, the life and work of Errol Hill, an African American educator at Dartmouth, and works by African American authors in the Library's collections.

This exhibit is displayed with gratitude to Gary Love '76 for proposing the exhibit, Dennis Grady the exhibit designer, and curators Laura Braunstein, Morgan Swan, Whitney Martin, and Laura Barrett.

Baker-Berry Library, Berry Main Street: February 10 - April  30, 2017

Exhibit reception, Berry Main Street: Monday, April 10, 3:30-4:30pm



Tibetan and Himalayan Lifeworlds

Tibetan and Himalayan Lifeworlds exhibit poster

Tibetan and Himalayan Lifeworlds provides a window onto the unique culture and environment of the 'Roof of the World.' This exhibit explores the social and religious practices that shape life in Asia's high mountain environments, explores the political history of the region, and describes some of the encounters between foreigners and Himalayan and Tibetan people over time. The exhibit has been curated by Senior Lecturer Kenneth Bauer and Associate Professor Sienna Craig.

Tibetan and Himalayan Lifeworlds is enriched by the presence on campus of artist Tenzin Norbu, a painter from Dolpo, Nepal. Norbu studied traditional thangka painting as well as Buddhism from his father, following a lineage of painters that dates back more than 400 years. He is also one of the leading figures in contemporary Tibetan art. In January 2017, Norbu will spend time painting in Baker-Berry Main Hall (Thursday, January 19 and Wednesday, January 25, 9:30am-2:30pm), visiting classes, and staging a popup exhibit of some of his recent work at the Black Family Arts Center. For more information on Norbu's visit go to https://news.dartmouth.edu/events/event?event=42728.

This exhibit and Tenzin Norbu's residency at Dartmouth is made possible by support from the Dartmouth College Library, the HOOD Museum of Art, the Leslie Center for the Humanities, the Rockefeller Center, the Asian and Middle Eastern Studies program, and the departments of Anthropology, Art History, Religion, and Studio Art.

Exhibit design by Dennis Grady, Library Education & Outreach. Julia Cohen '18, a Presidential Scholar, contributed to the research, planning, and execution of this exhibit.. 

Baker-Berry Library, Baker Main Hall: January 6 - April 10, 2017



Paper - A Material of Empire and Revolution in South Asia

Paper exhibit poster

Paper is increasingly being replaced by screens, but it has been the material of conveying knowledge for millennia. As a motto written on manuscripts in an Indian archive dictates, a book should “be adorned like a dear son…safeguarded like a good plot of land…purified daily like one’s own body…and looked upon…like a good friend; it should be tied fast like a culprit sentenced to death and should always be remembered like the name of God.” The book is the material recording and dictating society, to be tended to and penalized, revered and conversant, but it is also vulnerable. Only if the book is preserved and protected will it escape from a “state of deterioration.” For the weakness of paper is in its fibers: delicious to insects, fading in sunlight, easy to tear, dampen, and decay. 

In this exhibition, curated by Holly Shaffer, Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the Humanities, and her students in Art History class 17.14, Art and Industry in South Asia, 1800 to the Present, and drawn from materials in Baker-Berry Library and Rauner Special Collections Library, we examine the history of paper in South Asia (including present-day India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, and Sri Lanka) through the materials that chronicle it in four cases. First as a product in the case titled “Paper Made,” then as a vehicle for 19th-century British colonial bureaucracy in “Paper Empire.” Third, as a “Paper Revolt,” a 20th-century method of disseminating an anti-colonial, nationalist movement for independence, and finally in the contemporary artist Dayanita Singh’s photographs of archives. Here, “Post Paper,” bundles, stacks, files, and folders seem to wait patiently for a reader, slowly turning to dust. Paper not only creates and disperses history, but also becomes the source for its own documentation and demise. 

Exhibit curated by Holly Shaffer, Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the Humanities - South Asian & British Art, and her students in ARTH 17.14, Art and Industry: The Visual and Material Culture of South Asia, 1800 to Present:
Zachary Cherian ’20, Perri Haser ’17, Saleha Irfan ’19, Marina Massidda ’17, India Perdue ’19, Anneliese Thomas ’19, Emma Woodberry ’19, Haley Woodberry ’17

Sponsored by the Art History Department, Baker-Berry Library, the Leslie Center for the Humanities, and Rauner Special Collections Library.

Exhibit design by Dennis Grady, Library Education & Outreach.
Materials support by Deborah Howe, Collections Conservator and Lizzie Curran, Assistant Conservator.

Baker-Berry Library, Berry Main Street: November 1, 2016 - January  27, 2017



Printing Down Under

Printing Down Under exhibit poster

A Matariki Exchange

The Printer in Residence Program at University of Otago Library’s Otakou Press in Dunedin, New Zealand was initiated in 2003 to encourage awareness of the Press’ printmaking facilities and to foster book-making within both the University and the broader arts community. Each visiting printer uses the University Library’s printing presses to produce a limited edition publication. Sarah Smith, Dartmouth College Book Arts Workshop Program Manager, was this year’s Printer in Residence.

Dartmouth and the University of Otago are both members of the Matariki Network of Universities, an international group of seven universities from seven different countries that have long-excelled in research-led education. The five other Matariki members are: Durham University, England; Queen’s University, Canada; University of Tubingen, Germany; University of Western Australia; and Uppsala University, Sweden. 

This year the Otakou Press added a new element to the residency program—an exhibit exchange. An exhibit featuring Dartmouth Book Arts Workshop was displayed in the University of Otago’s Library during Sarah’s residency, and upon her return Sarah facilitated the installation of this exhibit featuring the work of the Otakou Press’ past and present Printers in Residence.

Printing Down Under: A Matariki Exchange was curated by Donald Kerr, Special Collections Librarian at the University of Otago Library; Dennis Grady, Dartmouth Library Education & Outreach; and Sarah Smith, Book Arts Workshop Program Manager. Exhibit design by Dennis Grady. 

Baker-Berry Library, Baker Main Hall: October 1 - December 31, 2016



Unforgettable First Pages

Unforgettable First Pages exhibit poster

We asked members of the Dartmouth community to suggest unforgettable first pages. Twelve responses are included in this exhibit.

First Pages selected by:

Stephen Angell, Baker-Berry User Services Technology Coordinator;
John DeSantis, Cataloging and Metadata Services Librarian;
Dennis Grady, Baker-Berry Exhibits Designer;
Deborah Howe, Collections Conservator;  
Elizabeth Kirk, Associate Librarian for Information Services;
Richard Miller, Baker-Berry Access Services Student Supervisor;
Gregory Phillips, Senior IT Support Analyst;
Eileen Potts, Library Information Access Assistant;
Jane Quigley, Head of Kresge Physical Sciences Library;
Ross Virginia, Director, Institute of Arctic Studies and Myers Family Professor of Environmental Science;
Christian Wolff, composer;
Nien Lin Xie, Librarian for East Asian Studies.

Exhibit curated and designed by Dennis Grady, Library Education and Outreach.

Baker-Berry Library, Berry Main Street: July 1 - September 30, 2016



Digital Humanities at Dartmouth: Portraits of a Community of Practice

Digital Humanities exhibit poster

What is digital humanities?

It is a community of practice at the intersection of texts and technologies. Digital humanists seek both to understand human culture (literature, art, media) by using technology, and to understand technology through a humanist lens. Digital humanists use computational methods, build digital collections, design online games, create new media, analyze textual data, and think critically about the technological environment in which we carry out our daily lives. Digital humanities is a collaborative endeavor, involving faculty and scholars across the disciplines—including English, Anthropology, Computer Science, Film & Media Studies, and Classics, to name a few—and practitioners around the institution, including technologists, archivists and librarians, graphic designers, programmers, and students, who work together in cross-disciplinary, cross-functional teams that operate outside traditional academic hierarchies. Currently, Dartmouth has a thriving digital humanities community. This exhibit showcases many—but not all—of the projects happening now at Dartmouth; we invite you to explore our work and our community further at digitalhumanities.dartmouth.edu

Digital Humanities at Dartmouth: Portraits of a Community of Practice was curated by  Laura Braunstein, Digital Humanities and English Librarian, and Scott Millspaugh, Instructional Designer. Design by Dennis Grady, Library Education & Outreach. 

Baker-Berry Library, Baker Main Hall: August 10 - September 30, 2016



Student Library Service Bookplate Program

2016 student bookplate exhibit poster

Dartmouth Class of 2016

The Student Library Service Bookplate Program honors the Library’s graduating student employees by inviting them to choose books and other items for the Library’s collections. Each item will receive a bookplate that acknowledges the student’s selection and honors his or her service to the Library.

Students are eligible if they worked at least two terms in any Library department (including RWIT, The Student Center for Research, Writing and Information Technology).

The Library will honor nearly fifty students from the class of 2016 with selections ranging from world fiction, cookbooks, and DVDs to children’s books, inspirational works, and historical scholarship.

The students who volunteered to participate in this year's exhibit are:

Nikhil Arora • Lois Maame Donkor Aryee • Bay Lauris ByrneSim • Emily K. Chan • Jordan Kastrinsky • Kyle P. McGoey • Bridget-Kate Sixkiller McNulty • Jimmy Ragan • Tyler Luis Rivera • Caroline Sohr • Jiyoung Song • Queenie Sukhadia • Robbie Tanner • Bryan David Thomson • Rui Zhang 

Exhibit design and photography by Dennis Grady, Library Education & Outreach. Many thanks to the fifteen students and interns who volunteered to participate in this exhibit, and to: Greg Potter, Research and Information Desk Coordinator; Goodie Corriveau, Acquisitions Assistant; Jillian Hinchliffe, Research & Instruction Services Information Associate; and Laura Braunstein, Digital Humanities and English Librarian, for their organizational help. 

Baker-Berry Library, Baker Main Hall: June 8 - July 22, 2016



Daoist Ritual and Practice

Daoist Ritual and Practice exhibit poster

Exploring specific moments from the rich tapestry of religious culture in China, this exhibit shows different ways for interacting with the divine, attaining transcendence, and establishing community. This variety of ideas and practices hint at the complex interactions between traditions and communities in China, and beyond, and show the richness of religious life and experience, limited only by the human imagination.

Exhibit curated by Professor Gil Raz, Department of Religion; design by Dennis Grady, Library Education and Outreach. Video editing by Xiaofan Zhang, Jones Media Center Digital Media Assistant.
Cosponsored by the Religion Department, Dean of Faculty Office, and Baker-Berry Library.

Baker-Berry Library, Berry Main Street: April 5 - June 24, 2016



Out of the Archive – Into the Streets: Dartmouth College, the Martín Chambi Archive, and the City of Cusco, Peru

Martin Chambi exhibit poster

Martín Chambi (1891-1973) is one of Latin America’s most renowned photographers. A Quechua-speaking native born in a small village in the vicinity of Lake Titicaca, Chambi considered himself the “representative of his race” and aspired to capture the entire gamut of life in the southern Peruvian Andes. Critics celebrate his exquisite and dramatic photographs of Machu Picchu and other archaeological sites, as well as his photographic manipulation of light and chiaroscuro that have earned him the title “painter of light.” 

The Martín Chambi Archive, in Cusco, Peru, holds more than 35,000 of the photographer’s glass plates,  which document the modernization and radical transformation of the region.  His images include the arrival of the first cars, the devastating earthquake of 1950, and members of all classes of society, from the chichera to the city’s elites. 

A Dartmouth – Martín Chambi Archive Collaboration

This Library exhibit, Out of the Archives – Into the Streets, showcases
Professor Silvia Spitta’s two-year collaboration with the Martín Chambi Archive. Thanks to a Dean of the Faculty Scholarly Innovation Grant, the project enabled the digitization of thousands of previously unseen glass plates, culminating with the city-wide exhibit El Cusco de Martín Chambi, in which thirty-two of Chambi’s iconic images were enlarged and set up in the streets. Argentine photographer Julio Pantoja documented the exhibit with the photographs included in this exhibit. 

The El Cusco de Martín Chambi exhibit underscored the importance —and the potential—of the archive as a source of cultural heritage, memory, and, ultimately, community. 

Out of the Archives - Into the Streets, curated by Professor Silvia Spitta, Jill Baron, and Dennis Grady, is offered in conjunction with Out of the Archive: Photography, Patrimony, and Performance in Latin America, an international conference generously sponsored by the Leslie Humanities Center, the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, the Associate Dean of the Arts and Humanities, the Hood Museum of Art, and the Native American Studies Program, April 14-15, 2016. Exhibit design by Dennis Grady.

Baker-Berry Library, Baker Main Hall: April 1 - June 3, 2016



 Reading the Revolution - Late 20th Century Chinese Graphic Novels

Chinese Graphic Novels exhibit poster

Chinese graphic novels were first published in the 1920s. The popularity of these novels rose in the 1950s and peaked in late 1960s and 1970s, but continued to be published until the 1990s. During the 1960s and 1970s, when the Cultural Revolution swept throughout China, schools were closed and books were destroyed. For years, Mao Zedong’s writings, such as Quotations from Chairman  Mao Tse-tung (“Little Red Book”), became the predominant reading materials in  China. Under these peculiar historical  circumstances, graphic novels became a  major educational tool and source of  entertainment for young people, especially children. As most families lacked the  financial resources to purchase them for their children, most obtained the books by renting. Book stalls offered long benches and stools for children to sit and read.  The typical cost for renting a single volume was a penny or two.

It is not an exaggeration to say that graphic novels were indispensable to a Chinese  generation growing up during the 1950s  and 1960s.  Many children spent hours of their daily life reading them throughout their childhood. 

During a time when political turmoil  prevailed and cultural heritage deteriorated, graphic novels, through vivid images and  colorful storytelling, encouraged children’s imagination, gave them an alternative to  heavily political materials and enriched  their primary education. 

Since 2014, the Dartmouth College Library has selectively collected over a dozen  titles of Chinese graphic novels ranging  from 1957-1989 with the majority published  in the 1970’s. The examples in this exhibit  provide some insight into how millions of Chinese school aged children were educating themselves in the midst of political turmoil during the Cultural Revolution. In addition, they provide readers a glimpse of what  life was like under the circumstances and  serve as a testimony to the impacts these  movements brought to people and society.

Reading the Revolution: Late 20th Century Chinese Graphic Novels was curated by Nien Lin Xie, Librarian for East Asian Studies; design by Dennis Grady, Library Education and Outreach.

Baker-Berry Library, Baker Main Hall: January 11 - March 11, 2016



A Lot of Good This Daylight's Gonna Do Us - Cult Cinema from 1968 to 1988: Three Directors

Cult Cinema exhibit poster

A Lot of Good This Daylight's Gonna Do Us - Cult Cinema from 1968 to 1988: Three Directors examines the work of John Carpenter, David Cronenberg, and George Romero within their larger cultural context. Curator Wesley Benash explains his long-standing interest in the subject:

"When I was six years old, by father let me rent Brian De Palma’s film Carrie from the video store.  It scared the hell out of me, but it also spawned a lifelong fascination with the shadowy, macabre underbelly of the cinema.  As a young boy and teenager, I was interested in these films for their sensational elements –violence, gore, and sex.  As I grew up, I began to appreciate them for their sociopolitical elements instead, and I came to understand how less reputable forms of cinema, such as the horror film and exploitation film, frequently had much to say about the societies in which they were produced.  As a student, I have parlayed this interest in cult film into scholarship; the admiration and appreciation I have for these films serves as the backbone of the thesis I am writing in Dartmouth’s Master of Arts in Liberal Studies program.

"The films on display, and others like them, tend to function as cinema’s id, forcing us to acknowledge the ugliness within society and within ourselves; it is for this reason that they repulse so many viewers.  But for those who are willing to open their minds to these films, they are equally audacious and enlightening.

"I obsessively watched the works of John Carpenter, David Cronenberg, and George Romero as a boy and teenager.  I think they are great artists and that their best work stands up to the finest products of Hollywood, Italian neorealism, the French New Wave, or any other period in cinema history.  It is my hope that upon viewing their work, you will feel the same."

Exhibit curated by Wesley Benash; design by Dennis Grady, Library Education and Outreach. 

Baker-Berry Library, Berry Main Street: January 5 - March 11, 2016



 Christian Wolff: beginning anew with every ending

Christian Wolff exhibit poster

By the time he came to Dartmouth to teach Classics, Comparative Literature, and Music in 1971, Christian Wolff was already a world-renowned composer, as a member of the “New York School” of American composers with John Cage, Morton Feldman, Earle Brown, and David Tudor. He had played a key role in the revolution in music composition at mid-century when, at the age of 16, he gave a copy of The I Ching – or Book of Changes to his new-found composition teacher, John Cage. Cage had been searching for a way to rescue his music from his own preconceptions, aesthetic habits, and learned musical expectations. The I Ching provided a way, through the introduction of chance procedures into the process of composing music, for Cage to remove his own preferences from the process. As Kay Larson notes in Where the Heart Beats–John Cage, Zen Buddhism, and the Inner Life of Artists (NY: Penguin Press, 2012), “Christian’s gift of The I Ching—like a blessing that could never have been anticipated—made the revolution possible.”

This exhibit highlights key aspects of Christian Wolff’s works: indeterminacy, politics and collaboration; and celebrates the composer’s long association with Dartmouth College as a professor of music, classics and comparative literature. It is offered in conjunction with The Exception and the Rule: a Celebration of Christian Wolff Featuring International Contemporary Ensemble (Ice).

Exhibit curated and designed by Dennis Grady, with help from Pat Fisken, Head of Paddock Music Library; Joy Weale, Music Library Supervisor; Deborah Howe, Dartmouth Library Collections Conservator; Meghan Grela ’17; Reid Watson ’16; and Prajeet Bajpai ’16. Many thanks to Margaret Lawrence, Director of Programming at the Hopkins Center, for suggesting a Library exhibit to complement the Hopkins Center’s program, The Exception and the Rule:  A Celebration of Christian Wolff; to Alvin Lucier and Amy Beal for permission to use their insightful published writings; to Stephanie Berger and Gordon Mumma for their photographs; and most of all, of course, to Christian Wolff for his astonishing music and for his many generous contributions to this exhibit.

 Baker-Berry Library, Baker Main Hall: September 18 - December 10, 2015

Exhibit reception: Thursday, October 22, 4PM.



Prepare Your Skeleton for the Air - Surrealism and the Spanish Avant-Garde in the Dartmouth College Library

Surrealism exhibit poster

Prepare Your Skeleton for the Air: Surrealism and the Spanish Avant-Garde in the Dartmouth College Library coincides with the Department of Spanish & Portuguese conference “Dalí, Lorca & Buñuel in America,” October 15-17, 2015. The exhibit features materials from the Dartmouth Library’s collections that display the influence of surrealism on the work of Salvador Dalí (1904-1989), Federico García Lorca (1898-1936), and Luis Buñuel (1900-1983). 

Our exhibit title, “Prepare Your Skeleton for the Air,” is from Federico Garcia Lorca’s poem “Ruin,” in his Poeta en Nueva York collection. The poem ends with these two stanzas:

Tú solo y yo quedamos.
Prepara tu esqueleto para el aire.
Yo solo y tú quedamos.

Prepara tu esqueleto.
Hay que buscar de prisa, amor, de prisa,
nuestro perfil sin sueño.

------

You alone and I remain.
Prepare your skeleton for the air.
I alone and you remain.

Prepare your skeleton.
One must look quickly, love, quickly,
for our profile without sleep.  

Exhibit curated by Jill Baron, Romance Languages and Literature Librarian, with help from José del Pino, Dartmouth Professor of Spanish; design by Dennis Grady, Library Education and Outreach; document and book preparation by Deborah Howe, Library Collections Conservator. 

Baker-Berry Library, Berry Main Street: October 8 - December 11, 2015

Exhibit reception: Friday, October 16, 5:30PM.



 Student Library Service Bookplate Program

2015 Student Bookplate exhibit poster

Dartmouth Class of 2015

The Student Library Service Bookplate Program honors the Library’s graduating student employees by inviting them to choose books and other items for the Library’s collections. Each item will receive a bookplate that acknowledges the student’s selection and honors his or her service to the Library. Students are eligible if they worked at least two terms in any Library department (including RWIT, The Student Center for Research, Writing and Information Technology). 

The Library is honoring over fifty students from the class of 2015 with selections ranging from world fiction, cookbooks, and DVDs to children’s books, inspirational works, and historical scholarship. This exhibit features sixteen students who have volunteered to share their thoughts with the Dartmouth community.

Baker-Berry Library / Baker Main Hall: June 12 - August 30, 2015

Exhibit design and photography by Dennis Grady, Library Education & Outreach. Many thanks to the students and interns who volunteered to participate in this exhibit, and to Greg Potter, Research and Information Desk Coordinator, for his organizational help.

This year's exhibit participants:

Karen Afre, Leandra Barrett, Emily Estelle, Ben Ferguson, Addison Himmelberger, Gavin Huang, Mitchell Jacobs, Diane Jang, Faizan Kanji, Courtney Kelly, Abbie Kouzmanoff, Justin Lee, Katie Lunt, Claire Pendergrast, Eva Petzinger, and Katie Williamson.



Geographies: New England Book Work

Geographies exhibit poster

The New England Chapter of The Guild of Book Workers

This exhibition displays a wide range of work from the members of the Guild of Book Workers’ New England chapter. The pieces relate to the show’s theme of New England, with entrants interpreting that theme as they wished. The 26 works in this exhibition span a range of contemporary book work— fine and design bindings, traditional and creative bookbinding, artist books and calligraphic manuscripts, and incorporate a variety of materials and production methods. Some members have created both the content and structure, while others have used an existing text as the basis for their work.

The Guild of Book Workers is a national organization founded in 1906 that brings together people involved in all the book arts. The New England Chapter, one of ten regional chapters with 180 members, organizes programs within the region, such as lectures, workshops, and exhibitions.  

Many thanks to Jay Satterfield for his help in choosing some related items from the Rauner Special Collections Library to exhibit at this venue alongside the NEGBW show. Thanks also to Deborah Howe, Tessa Gadomski, and Dennis Grady for their assistance. Exhibition curated by Stephanie Wolff, Preservation Services, Dartmouth College Library and NEGBW Exhibitions Coordinator.  

Baker-Berry Library / Berry Main Street: April 6 - August 21, 2015



 

The Secret Revealed - The Book Arts Workshop at 25 Years

Book Arts exhibit poster

Often called Dartmouth’s best-kept secret the Book Arts Workshop in Baker Library is celebrating its 25th anniversary. Created in 1989-1990 by Edward Connery Lathem, '51, Rocky Stinehour, '50, and Mark Lansburgh, '49, three former students of Professor Emeritus Ray Nash, the studio is located in the former location of Nash’s Graphic Arts Program, Baker Library Room 21-23. From its early beginnings of letterpress instruction the workshop has grown to include bookbinding and curricular support of the arts of the book.

Baker-Berry Library / Baker Main Hall: March 20 - June 5, 2015

Curated by Barbara R. Sagraves, Preservation Services, and Sarah Smith, Book Arts Workshop. Designed by Dennis Grady, Library Education & Outreach. Materials preparation by Pat Cope and Phyllis Gilbert, Rauner Special Collections Library, and Deborah Howe and Stephanie Wolff, Preservation Services.  Special thanks to Jay Satterfield, Rauner Special Collections Library, and Jeff Horrell, Dartmouth College Libraries, for their invaluable suggestions.



The Design Work of Alvin Eisenman '43

Alvin Eisenman exhibit poster

The design work of the long-time director of the first graduate program in graphic design in America.

This exhibition highlights Alvin Eisenman's design work before and during his career as a design educator at the Yale School of Art for over 40 years. For a better understanding of the sources and influences that led to the creation of the seminal academic program in graphic design in America, this show includes some of Eisenman's earlier and lesser-known works. The exhibit also serves to display the role and range of a professional book designer. Included below is a link to a video tribute to Eisenman by his former student, Garson Yu.

In conjunction with this exhibition, this year's Stephen Harvard Memorial Lecture featured a talk by Douglass Scott on Eisenman's role in the rise of the modern graphic design profession in the post-WWII era. Scott, a former student and teaching colleague of Eisenman at Yale, is a designer, design educator, and former creative director at WGBH, the PBS affiliate in Boston. The talk was sponsored by The Friends of the Dartmouth College Library.

Exhibition curated by Won K. Chung ’73 and based on an earlier exhibit by John T. Hill. Exhibit design by Dennis Grady, Library Education & Outreach. Photographs by John Hill. Special thanks to Sara Eisenman and the Eisenman family, and to Thomas Strong ’60 for their assistance and loan of materials.

Baker-Berry Library / Baker Main Hall: December 19, 2014-March 15, 2015

[Image: Broadside, 17" x 22", designed by Alvin Eisenman as part of the portfolio, Homage to the Book, New York: West Virginia Pulp & Paper Company, 1968. Rauner Library collection.]

Alvin Eisenman - A Video Tribute by Garson Yu



Meet DALI

DALI Lab exhibit poster

The Neukom DALI Lab was founded in April 2013. This exhibition highlights some of the amazing work students have done in the lab since.

Exhibition curation and design by Runi Goswami ‘13 MS ’15. Videos by Delainey Ackerman ‘15, Jake Gaba ’16, and Nook Harquail ‘14 MS ’15. Mechanical gear wall by Luke Zirngibl ‘14 MS ’15.

Installed by Marissa Allen ‘14 MS ’15, Runi Goswami ‘13 MS ’15, Nook Harquail ‘14 MS ’15, Malika Khurana ‘15, Ryan Smith '14, and Tim Tregubov ’11 MS’15.

Baker-Berry Library / Berry Main Street: January 21 - March 31, 2015

 

For more information on the Neukom DALI Lab, visit https://dali.dartmouth.edu/