CHAMBER MUSIC IN LATIN AMERICA, PAST AND PRESENT

A DARTMOUTH COLLEGE SYMPOSIUM PRESENTED IN CONJUNCTION

WITH THE HOPKINS CENTER RESIDENCY OF THE

CUARTETO LATINOAMERICANO

29 & 30 JANUARY, 1998
FAULKNER RECITAL HALL
4 to 6 PM


 PROGRAM

THURSDAY, 29 JANUARY, 4-6 PM, FAULKNER RECITAL HALL

Welcome:
Professor Lewis Crickard
Director of the Hopkins Center for the Performing Arts

SESSION CHAIR:

T. FRANK KENNEDY, S. J.
(CHAIR, MUSIC DEPARTMENT, BOSTON COLLEGE)

 

SPEAKERS:

"Invented Nations, Invented Nationalisms in Vocal Chamber Music of Argentina"
BERNARDO ILLARI, SANTA CRUZ, BOLIVIA, (UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO)

"Public and private: a sight-rendering of two centuries of Mexican chamber music (1780-1980)"
RICARDO MIRANDA, MÉXICO CITY, (CENIDIM)

 

ROUND TABLE PANEL:

MEMBERS OF CUARTETO LATINOAMERICANO
SALLY PINKAS
RICARDO MIRANDA
BERNARDO ILLARI
GERARDO DIRIE
WILLIAM SUMMERS


PROGRAM

FRIDAY, 30 JANUARY, 4-6 PM, FAULKNER RECITAL HALL 

SESSION CHAIR

KAREN PAINTER,
HARVARD UNIVERSITY


SPEAKERS:

"Art, Culture and Music in the Jesuit Reductions of Paraguay, 1605-1767"
T. FRANK KENNEDY, S. J., (BOSTON COLLEGE)

"Music, Texture and Drama in Contemporary Latin American Chamber Music"
GERARDO DIRIE, Cordoba, Argentina (INDIANA UNIVERSITY) 

 

ROUND TABLE PANEL:

WILLIAM SUMMERS
GERARDO DIRIE
T. FRANK KENNEDY, S. J.
RICARDO MIRANDA
BERNARDO ILLARI


 

Symposium Participants

Gerardo Dirie

Born in Córdoba, Argentina (1958), Dirie is a composer who studied at the Universidád Nacionál de Córdoba with Cesar Franchisena, Atilio Arguello, and Oscar Bazan; and later at Indiana University, United States, with John Eaton and Eugene O'Brien. His career has been distinguished with awards from Fulbright, ASCAP, the International Tribune of Composers (Paris and Helsinki), the National Tribune of Electroacoustic Composers of Argentina, the National Fund for the Arts, and Fundación Encuentros de Musica Contemporanea in Argentina. His music has been performed in numerous concert halls of the Americas, Europe and Asia. Besides creating works for professional musicians and ensembles, Dirie has also been commissioned to write the music for stage productions at the Indiana Repertory Theatre, to write choral music for a CNN educational documentary, and to compose new music for children. Currently, he is coordinator of the Latin American Music Center at Indiana University. His work in composition, music education, and performance is inspired by the musics of various cultures, and by his experience as choral conductor, rock band bassist, clarinetist, and early music performer.

Bernardo Illari

Born in Córdoba, Argentina in 1963,Illari is a musicologist, composer and performer specializing in Latin American Baroque music. He first attended the Universidád Nacionál de Córdoba, where he received a degree in composition (1987) and worked as Assistant Professor in Music History (1988-1992). He then traveled to the United States to continue graduate studies at the University of Chicago; he received his masters degree in 1995 and his doctoral candidacy the following year. He has been chosen as the first Howard Mayer Brown fellow by the American Musicological Society for the academic year 1996-1997. He recently received an "American Musicological Society 50 Fellowship" from the same institution for the year 1997-98. For the last fifteen months, he has been in residence in Sucre (Bolivia), where he is conducting research for his dissertation, "Cathedral Music in Chuquisaca During the Eighteenth Century: The History of a Musical Culture". Bernardo has lectured on his areas of expertise in France, Switzerland, Spain, Argentina, Bolivia, Peru, and the United States. His compositions have been performed in Argentina and the United States, and he has worked with early music ensembles in those same two countries. He has also provided the musical editions and the musicological coaching for nine compact disks of colonial compositions edited in Spain and France between 1992 and 1996.

T. Frank Kennedy

Chair of the Department of Music at Boston College, Kennedy is a Jesuit priest and musicologist who specializes in music of the early Baroque period. His graduate dissertation from the University of California at Santa Barbara on the musical traditions of the early Jesuit colleges and churches in Europe has led him to consider the adaptation of that same rich musical tradition in the far-flung territories where the Jesuits established themselves. Professor Kennedy has published various articles about the Jesuit musical tradition previous to 1773 in such journals as Studi Musicali, Latin American Music Review, and the Archivum Historicum Societatis Jesu. He is one of the editors for the University of Toronto volume entitled, The Jesuits: Cultures, the Sciences and the Arts, 1540-1773, and also is editing for publication the 17th-century opera Apotheosis sive Consecratio SS. Ignatii et Francisci Xaverii, by Johannes Kapsberger, originally produced in 1622 as part of the festivities at the Roman College marking the canonizations of Ignatius of Loyola and Francis Xavier. Professor Kennedy was the producer of the Apotheosis that was mounted professionally in 1991 at Boston College. In 1997 at Boston College he also produced San Ignacio, an eighteenth-century chamber opera from the ancient Jesuit Province of Paraguay.

Ricardo Miranda

Described by Radu Lupu as "a capable pianist, with an extraordinary musical intelligence", Ricardo Miranda studied piano under Nelly Ben-Or in London, where he lived from 1986 to 1992. He also studied analysis and composition with Dr. Hans Heimler, himself a pupil of Schenker and Berg, before joining London's City University, where he earned his M. A. in Music Performance Studies (with distinction, 1989), and a Ph.D. degree in Musicology (1992).

On his return to Mexico, he joined the National University's Instituto de Investigaciones Estéticas, where he worked for a year before being appointed Assistant Director of CENIDIM, Mexico's National Centre for Musical Research and Information. He holds a seminar on music at the History of Art postgraduate department in the National University and has taught at other Mexican institutions, including the Conservatorio de las Rosas and the Faculty of Music of the Universidád Veracruzana. For the period 1997-1999 he was awarded a National Research Fellowship by the Mexican Government.

Dr. Miranda has offered lectures both in Mexico and abroad (U. S. A., Spain, Great Britain) and has published widely on different aspects of Mexican music. These include a book on José Rolón (El sonido de lo propio: José Rolón (1876-1945), CENIDIM, 1994), a monograph on Antonio Sarrier (18th century), with a preface by Robert Stevenson, as well as articles on José Pablo

Moncayo (Latin American Music Review, vol. 11, no. 2; 1990, Pauta, vol. XIII, no. 52, 1994), Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz --17th-century poet and musician (Pauta, vol. XIV, no. 55, 1995), 19th-century Mexican piano music (Heterofonia, no. 107, 1992) and Mexican opera composers (New Grove Dictionary of Opera, 1993). He also discovered and edited the only known score by Mariano Elízaga, a key 19th-century figure in the history of Mexican music (Mariano Elízaga: últimas variaciones, CENIDIM, 1994). He has recently prepared a book on Manuel María Ponce which will appear during the summer of 1998.

Karen Painter

A musicologist on the faculty at Harvard University, Painter specializes in music and culture from the late 18th century to the mid 20th. Early training as a pianist and philosopher has led her to integrate treatment of issues in aesthetics, ethics, and musical practice. More recently, she has been researching the ideology of music, speaking on fascism at an international conference in London, and is writing a book on the political and cultural exploitation of the symphony. She has scholarly publications on Mahler, Brahms, and Mozart, and has written as a music critic in newspapers in Boston, New Haven, and San Francisco. She has spoken to general audiences at Lincoln Center, at the Hopkins Center, and in Salzburg. Painter received her BA from Yale and Ph. D. from Columbia, and has previously taught at Dartmouth, Columbia, and the University of Oregon.

William Summers

A musicologist on the faculty of music at Dartmouth College, Summers is the founder and Coordinator of the International Hispanic Music Study Group, a worldwide confederation of approximately 150 scholars and performers who explore music from or inspired by the cultures of the Iberian Peninsula. Since 1993 he has edited the Study Group's Newsletter which appears twice a year. Summers is author of the book Fourteenth-Century English Polyphony (1983), and more than fifty-five articles and reviews that have appeared in Early Music History, Music and Letters, The Journal of Musicology, Revista de Musicología, Inter-American Music Review, Research Chronicle of the Royal Musical Association, and four Congress Reports of the International Musicological Society. These studies have been devoted to medieval English music, the sixteenth-century Roman music confraternity, the Compagnia dei musici de Roma, and Spanish music from Alta California. Since 1994, Summers has focused his research upon Spanish colonial music in Manila, the Philippines. This year he has and will present research papers in London, Boston, Phoenix, Mexico City, Santa Cruz, Bolivia and Manila.