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Women in Science Project
6243 Parker House, 2nd floor
(Located in a two-story white frame house)
Hanover, NH
03755-3529
Phone: (603) 646-3690
Email: WISP@Dartmouth.EDU
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Welcome to WISP @ Dartmouth

WISP's mission is to collaborate in creating a learning environment where women can thrive in science, engineering and mathematics.  We welcome your feedback. Please explore the WISP website to learn more about our programs and contact us at WISP@Dartmouth.edu with any questions, comments or suggestions.

WISP Programs and Events

WISP Peer Mentor Program Kickoff event
When: Thursday, October 16, 6 –7:30 PM
Where: Occom Commons

WISP lunch with Los Alamos Lab Chemist Susan Kloek Hanson '03
When: Thursday, November 6, 12–1 PM
Where: Collis 212
Details tba

WISP Research Internship Program-Upcoming deadlines:

• October 26 (Sunday): Deadline for faculty and students to submit top internship choices for Round 1
• November 3 (Monday): Notification of Round 1 Matches
• November 6 (Thursday): Round 2 Project Descriptions available
• November 6 - 17: Round 2 interview period

WISP in the News

As an engineering student and co-coordinator of the Peer Mentor Program within Dartmouth’s Women in Science Project (WISP), Julie Ann Haldeman ’14 was excited to help WISP pair first-year female students with upper-class female mentors of similar academic interests. After all, she had the same done for her three years ago. “Serving as a peer mentor is one small way of paying it forward to future classes of female engineers,” says Haldeman, who shares her duties with Lauren Salgueiro ’15. “I stay involved in WISP since I feel it’s important to help build a strong community of women in the sciences.” - See more at: http://engineering.dartmouth.edu/magazine/wisp-leading-women-into-engineering#sthash.vHDTe7h1.dpuf

WISP Leading Women Into Engineering

By Anna Fiorentino
October 2013 • CoolStuff

As an engineering student and co-coordinator of the Peer Mentor Program within Dartmouth’s Women in Science Project (WISP), Julie Ann Haldeman ’14 was excited to help WISP pair first-year female students with upper-class female mentors of similar academic interests. After all, she had the same done for her three years ago. “Serving as a peer mentor is one small way of paying it forward to future classes of female engineers,” says Haldeman, who shares her duties with Lauren Salgueiro ’15. “I stay involved in WISP since I feel it’s important to help build a strong community of women in the sciences.”

- See more at: http://engineering.dartmouth.edu/magazine/wisp-leading-women-into-engineering#sthash.vHDTe7h1.dpuf

WISP Leading Women Into Engineering

By Anna Fiorentino
October 2013 • CoolStuff

As an engineering student and co-coordinator of the Peer Mentor Program within Dartmouth’s Women in Science Project (WISP), Julie Ann Haldeman ’14 was excited to help WISP pair first-year female students with upper-class female mentors of similar academic interests. After all, she had the same done for her three years ago. “Serving as a peer mentor is one small way of paying it forward to future classes of female engineers,” says Haldeman, who shares her duties with Lauren Salgueiro ’15. “I stay involved in WISP since I feel it’s important to help build a strong community of women in the sciences.”

- See more at: http://engineering.dartmouth.edu/magazine/wisp-leading-women-into-engineering#sthash.vHDTe7h1.dpuf
As an engineering student and co-coordinator of the Peer Mentor Program within Dartmouth’s Women in Science Project (WISP), Julie Ann Haldeman ’14 was excited to help WISP pair first-year female students with upper-class female mentors of similar academic interests. After all, she had the same done for her three years ago. “Serving as a peer mentor is one small way of paying it forward to future classes of female engineers,” says Haldeman, who shares her duties with Lauren Salgueiro ’15. “I stay involved in WISP since I feel it’s important to help build a strong community of women in the sciences.” - See more at: http://engineering.dartmouth.edu/magazine/wisp-leading-women-into-engineering#sthash.vHDTe7h1.dpufWISP in the News

Accidental Entrepreneurs
Posted on October 6, 2014

This story was originally published in the Dartmouth College Fund's fall 2014 issue of From the GREEN.
Engineering majors Krystyna Miles '16 of North Salem, N.Y., and Shinri Kamei '16, of Tokyo, Japan, met in "ENGS 21: Introduction to Engineering," when they were charged with designing a solution to a mobility problem. Their team developed an ergonomic serving tray that won the Jackson Engineering Prize and the 2014 Dartmouth Ventures entrepreneurship competition. Miles and Kamei recently founded Tray Bien, a new venture to manufacture and distribute the tray to the food service industry. From the GREEN spoke with Miles and Kamei about Tray Bien

WISP increases female participation in the sciences
By AMELIA ROSCH, The Dartmouth Staff
November 7, 2013

In 1990, there were only 45 senior women at Dartmouth who majored in the sciences. The number has since more than doubled, thanks largely to programs such as the Women in Science Project and professors’ ongoing efforts to reach out to women undergraduates...

From Dartmouth Engineer Magazine-WISP Leading Women into Engineering
By Anna Fiorentino, October 2013

As an engineering student and co-coordinator of the Peer Mentor Program within Dartmouth's Women in Science Project, Julie Ann Haldeman ''14 was excited to help WISP pair first year female students with upper-class female mentors of similar academic interests. After all, she had the same done for her three years ago . "Serving as a peer mentor is one small way to pay it forward to future classes of female engineers, " says Haldeman, who shares her duties with Lauren Salgueiro '15...

As an engineering student and co-coordinator of the Peer Mentor Program within Dartmouth’s Women in Science Project (WISP), Julie Ann Haldeman ’14 was excited to help WISP pair first-year female students with upper-class female mentors of similar academic interests. - See more at: http://engineering.dartmouth.edu/magazine/wisp-leading-women-into-engineering#sthash.vHDTe7h1.dpuf
As an engineering student and co-coordinator of the Peer Mentor Program within Dartmouth’s Women in Science Project (WISP), Julie Ann Haldeman ’14 was excited to help WISP pair first-year female students with upper-class female mentors of similar academic interests. After all, she had the same done for her three years ago. “Serving as a peer mentor is one small way of paying it forward to future classes of female engineers,” says Haldeman, who shares her duties with Lauren Salgueiro ’15. “I stay involved in WISP since I feel it’s important to help build a strong community of women in the sciences.” - See more at: http://engineering.dartmouth.edu/magazine/wisp-leading-women-into-engineering#sthash.vHDTe7h1.dpuf
As an engineering student and co-coordinator of the Peer Mentor Program within Dartmouth’s Women in Science Project (WISP), Julie Ann Haldeman ’14 was excited to help WISP pair first-year female students with upper-class female mentors of similar academic interests. After all, she had the same done for her three years ago. “Serving as a peer mentor is one small way of paying it forward to future classes of female engineers,” says Haldeman, who shares her duties with Lauren Salgueiro ’15. “I stay involved in WISP since I feel it’s important to help build a strong community of women in the sciences.” - See more at: http://engineering.dartmouth.edu/magazine/wisp-leading-women-into-engineering#sthash.vHDTe7h1.dpuf

Women in Science News

Internet giant Google is seeking to teach computer programming to millions of girls in the US under its Made with Code initiative, which has an eye on developing women programmers in the Silicon Valley.: Made with Code: Inspiring the next generation of girl coders

"We have to understand that bias is a problem every single one of us has to deal with," says Professor Mary Flanagan in an interview with Polygon about designing video games that promote social change. Read more at:
http://dartgo.org/quoteflanagan2.

BBC News Hour: Getting Girls into Science
Google Executive Susan Wojcicki discusses how to encourage girls to study maths and science. She is joined by tech blogger Shanley Kane, Dr Telle Whitney, CEO of the Anita Borg Institute, and Kristen Pownell, a second year student at Stanford University majoring in electrical engineering...

Happy Ada Lovelace Day- A Day to Remember the First Computer Programmer Was a Woman
10/15/13 NY Times article by CLAIRE CAIN MILLER

In 1842, Ada Lovelace, known as the “enchantress of numbers,” wrote the first computer program.
Fast-forward 171 years to today (which happens to be Ada Lovelace Day, for highlighting women in science, technology, engineering and math), and computer programming is dominated by men.
Women software developers earn 80 percent of what men with the same jobs earn. Just 18 percent of computer science degrees are awarded to women, down from 37 percent in 1985. Fewer than 5 percent of venture-backed tech start-ups are founded by women.
Those statistics, released by Symantec, the security company, and the Anita Borg Institute, which works to recruit and promote women in tech, provide context for recent debates in Silicon Valley, like why Twitter has no women on its board....


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last Updated: 10/16/14