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Chernobyl Heart Screening

Director and two main characters will visit campus for discussion of Oscar-winning documentary

On Tues., May 3, the Oscar-winning HBO documentary Chernobyl Heart will be shown at 7 p.m. in 105 Dartmouth Hall. Director/producer Maryann De Leo and two of the film's main characters will participate in a panel discussion. The film and the discussion are free and open to the public.


The Chernobyl nuclear reactor, site of the 1986 accident

Chernobyl Heart won a 2004 Academy Award for Best Documentary Short. The 40-minute film focuses on the lives of children in Belarus, just north of the Ukrainian site of the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident. According to the documentary, in Belarus only 15-20 percent of babies are born healthy. Many children are afflicted with radiation-related illnesses, specifically congenital birth defects.

De Leo will be joined by two key characters from the documentary, Adi Roche, the founder and Executive Director of Ireland's Chernobyl Children's Project International, and William

Novick, a pediatric cardiac surgeon and the founder and Medical Director of the International Children's Heart Foundation. They will also participate in classes and meet with students during their visit.

"I think this film tells an important story of environmental safety and ecological stewardship, as well as one of human compassion and generosity," says Lee Witters, Professor of Biological Sciences and event organizer.

The visit is supported by the Nathan Smith Pre-medical Society, The John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding, the Provost's Office, the Dartmouth Medical School Dean's Office, the departments of Pediatrics and of Russian, The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center and The Tucker Foundation.  For more information, contact Janet Fatherley at 650-1908.

By SUSAN KNAPP

Questions or comments about this article? We welcome your feedback.

Last Updated: 12/17/08