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NSF recognizes two faculty members

Career Awards encourage young scholars

Two Dartmouth professors have recently been honored with a Career Award from the National Science Foundation (NSF). The award recognizes and supports the activities of teacher/scholars early in their careers, and the awardees are often considered emerging leaders in their respective fields. Recipients are selected for career development plans that integrate research and teaching.

Sean Smith and Amit Chakrabarti
Sean Smith and Amit Chakrabarti

Amit Chakrabarti

Assistant Professor of Computer Science Amit Chakrabarti conducts research in complexity theory, which falls under the broader umbrella of theoretical computer science. He investigates the inherent difficulty of computational problems, as measured by the amount of computer resources required for their solution. Chakrabarti is especially interested in the resources involved in inter-computer communication; he studies how communication complexity impacts computational or information systems. The NSF Career Award will allow Chakrabarti to pursue research in communication complexity and its applications to areas such as data stream computations and circuit complexity.

Sean Smith

Establishing trustworthiness in our computers and in Internet activity is the business of Sean Smith, Assistant Professor of Computer Science and the Director of the Cyber Security and Trust Research Center at Dartmouth's Institute for Security Technology Studies. He is studying how to use public key infrastructure (cryptographic tools for identity and information integrity) and trusted computing technology (hardware tools for computational integrity) to build trustworthy relationships among users spanning many organizations. The NSF Career Award will aid Smith in his work to bridge the gap between current information infrastructure technology and the trust requirements that people have.

By SUSAN KNAPP

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Last Updated: 12/17/08