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The Indian History of an American Institution
Native Americans and Dartmouth
Colin G. Calloway




Dartmouth College Press
2010 • 280 pp. 28 illus. 1 map. 6 x 9"
Native American Studies

$29.95 Paperback, 978-1-58465-844-3
$7.99 Ebook, 978-1-58465-907-5

Check your ebook retailer or local library for ebook availability.



“Colin G. Calloway is to be commended for undertaking such an effort in The Indian History of an American Institution: Native Americans at Dartmouth, a work that embodies the complexity demanded by such a story while maintaining a unifying narrative. At the heart of his book is his belief that ‘this college in the woods’ was ostensibly founded for the education of Indian students.” Review of Higher Education

A history of the complex relationship between a school and a people

Dartmouth College began life as an Indian school, a pretense that has since been abandoned. Still, the institution has a unique, if complicated, relationship with Native Americans and their history. Beginning with Samson Occom’s role as the first “development officer” of the college, Colin G. Calloway tells the entire, complex story of Dartmouth’s historical and ongoing relationship with Native Americans. Calloway recounts the struggles and achievements of Indian attendees and the history of Dartmouth alumni’s involvements with American Indian affairs. He also covers more recent developments, such as the mascot controversies, the emergence of an active Native American student organization, and the partial fulfillment of a promise deferred. This is a fascinating picture of an elite American institution and its troubled relationship— at times compassionate, at times conflicted—with Indians and Native American culture.

A podcast of an interview with author Colin Calloway is available here.


Click here for TABLE OF CONTENTS

Reviews:

“The historical context and description of individuals participating in Indian history are strengths of this institutional history of Indians at Dartmouth.” Choice

“Readers will marvel at how adroitly [Calloway] has weaved his narrative from ‘scattered glimpses’ of Indian students at Dartmouth . . . The result is an admirable account, thoroughly contextualized, of all that can be learned about ‘Indian History’ at Dartmouth to 1970.”—Vermont History

"In clear, engaging prose, Calloway carefully places the fascinating details of this story in the context of developments in the nation and in Indian country. This is a book that should be read and considered by a wise audience in and out of Dartmouth." —Historical New Hampshire

Endorsements:

“The wait for this book has been worthwhile for it is clear that the subject was waiting patiently for Colin Calloway. He is a truly distinguished scholar in the field of Native American history; that field is now enriched by this book. Recommended for anyone interested in Dartmouth history, the history of American higher education, or Native American history—and for anyone who enjoys a good story well told.”
James Wright, President Emeritus, Eleazar Wheelock Professor of History, Dartmouth College

“A must read for anyone seriously interested in the subject announced in the subtitle: Native Americans and Dartmouth. Professor Calloway tells the story from start to present in detail, with sensitivity, and without becoming judgmental. The book is especially rich in biographical material about Indians attending Dartmouth, and about the relationship between what took place in the nation and what took place in Hanover. Until now anyone trying to learn about Dartmouth's Indian history has had to deal with lots of misinformation. Colin Calloway has done an immense service by setting things straight."—Jere Daniell, Professor of History Emeritus, Dartmouth College



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COLIN G. CALLOWAY is John Kimball Jr. 1943 Professor of History and Professor of Native American Studies at Dartmouth College. He is the author of numerous books, including One Vast Winter Count: The Native American West Before Lewis and Clark (2003), which won six best-book awards.






Sun, 5 Oct 2014 14:37:30 -0500