2015

Events

2015 Conference on Mercury as a Global Pollutant

Celia Chen is on the Steering Committee for the 12th International meeting on mercury taking place June 14-19 in Jeju, Korea.

Recent News

May

Valley News Column on Importance of Testing Private Wells for Arsenic

In a recent ,Valley News column, Dr. Carolyn Murray stressed the importance of homeowners having their private wells tested for arsenic levels. Dr. Murray is the Director of Community Outreach for Dartmouth's Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Center and a professor at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth and the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice.

Legislation to Limit Inorganic Arsenic in Rice Introduced in Congress

Congresswoman Rosa DeLauro (CT) has introduced the R.I.C.E. Act which sets federal limits on the amount of inorganic arsenic in rice and rice-based foods. Inorganic arsenic is the most toxic form of arsenic found in foods.

Consumer Reports Calls for Stricter Federal Guidelines on Consumption of Tuna

In its June issue, Consumer Reports calls for stricter federal guidelines on the consumption of tuna due to a concern about the health risks of increased mercury levels in tuna and other fish.

Arsenic Poses Risks for Private Wells

An article in the Perham Focus (Minnesota) describes risks of water contamination in private wells by arsenic.

Celia Chen Participated in "A Fish Tale: A Review of the Science of Fish Contamination, Consumption, and Advisories"

As part of the Collaborative on Health and the Environment national partnership call series, Celia Chen, Ph.D. presented her work on Factors Controlling Mercury Fate in Aquatic Food Webs.

April

FDA Expects to Withdraw Approval for Last Food-Animal Drug Containing Arsenic

Read More

Superfund Research Brief - Switchgrass & Bacteria Remove PCBs from Soil

Read More

March

Washington Post Reports on Hidden Benefits of Cutting Coal Pollution

Washington Post article. Click here for additional information on mercury.

Director Stanton Quoted in Huffington Post on Arsenic Levels in Wine

The Huffington Post reports on California winemakers sued over arsenic levels in wine. Huffington Post article

Why Is There Arsenic in Wine Anyway?

Fox News story discusses research led by Kathryn Cottingham, professor of biological sciences, which found that white wine and beer significantly raised people's arsenic levels.

Researcher Brian Jackson in NYT on Arsenic in Rice Crackers

Brian Jackson, Ph.D. speaks to Deborah Blum for the NYT Column Ask Well; Dartmouth Now Coverage

Trainee Kate Buckman Leads New Paper on Berlin, NH Superfund Site

Coverage includes:
Environmental Monitor
Science Daily
Phys Org
and online in the journal Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry.

February

Record Number Attend Science Pub on Metals in Food

Eighty people attended the Pub on a cold, snowy evening. Questions and conversation focused on arsenic in food particularly rice, with additional questions on mercury in fish. The panelists conveyed the importance of limiting exposure to arsenic and mercury (which includes testing private well water) while continuing to eat a healthy diet including rice and fish. But is it Safe to Eat? What to Make of Those Food Studies

Superfund Researchers Present to NH Farm Bureau February 19

Celia Chen, RTC Leader and Kathrin Lawlor, CEC Coordinator, presented an overview of our SRP Center research and discussed NH Farm Bureau needs and questions relative to our studies of arsenic and mercury.

CBS News Story on Arsenic in Rice

CBS news coverage discusses FDA studies and health implications of eating rice over long term. CBS Coverage

January

Dragonfly Project at Gorham High School

Gorham High School science teacher Sarah Clemmitt received a Tillotson grant which allowed her class to continue their work with the Dartmouth SRP and the dragon fly citizen science project to measure mercury levels near the Berlin Superfund site. Berlin Daily Sun Article

Valley News Coverage of the Dragon Fly Citizen Scientist Project

The Dartmouth Superfund Program has been working with local high schools and the Schoodic Institute to study dragon fly larvae as an indicator of mercury levels in the environment. Valley News Article

2014 News

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