The Dartmouth Toxic Metals Superfund Research Program uses an interdisciplinary approach to investigate the ways in which arsenic and mercury in the environment affect ecosystems and human health. We communicate our results to communities, grass-roots organizations, and state and federal agencies, and we train students to conduct research from both a clinical and community-based perspective. We hope you will be inspired to ask questions about our work, and will learn about the ways these metals may affect your health.

What's New

Laurie Rardin and Partners Present on Private Well Testing

On August 18, Laurie Rardin spoke to 70 people from the community of Meredith, NH on the health effects of arsenic and other common contaminants found in private well water in NH. She was joined by partners from the NH Department of Environmental Services, the US Geological Survey and the NH Department of Health and Human Services for the presentation on private well testing and treatment, during which 50 well water test kits were distributed.

Nancy Serrell Featured in Dartmouth Now Interview

Dartmouh Now recently interviewd Nancy Serrell, Director of Science and Technology Outreach, Office of the Provost, on her current position and background. Nancy was a PI for Research Translation and Community Outreach for our Toxic Metals Research Program.

Dartmouth Superfund Program Featured in National Webinar

The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Superfund Research Program and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency hosted the webinar, “Progress in Research: Reducing Exposure to Mercury, Arsenic, and Asbestos” on July 9, 2015. 400 attendees learned about the Dartmouth College and University of Pennsylvania Superfund Research Center programs.

Latest Papers

Stanton, et al Paper Highlights Serious Effects of Arsenic

The report, MDI Biological Laboratory Arsenic Summit: Approaches to Limiting Human Exposure to Arsenic, published in Current Environmental Health Reports, focuses on the significant worldwide health problem caused by human exposure to arsenic in food and drinking water. The Summit, which was held August 12-14, 2014 at MDI Biological Laboratory in Salisbury Cove, ME, called for public health interventions and outlined five goals for reducing arsenic exposure and “building awareness and education” about arsenic's health impact.

Paper Details Novel Technology for Analysis of Plant Tissues

Dr. Tracy Punshon and colleagues played an important role in enabling the technology transfer for imaging the Arabidopsis plant and using this type of analysis for future research. The paper, Hyperspectral image reconstruction for x-ray fluorescence tomography, illustrates one of the first samples analyzed at APS beamline 13-ID-E via microtomography.

More Papers...

Latest News

Mercury: From Source to Seafood

WATCH Mercury: From Source to Seafood to learn how mercury enters the seafood we eat, why eating low-mercury fish is important for good health, and how to keep mercury out of the environment.

In Small Doses: Arsenic

WatchIn Small Doses: Arsenic and learn about the risks of exposure to arsenic in private well water.



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