The Dartmouth Toxic Metals Superfund Research Program uses an interdisciplinary approach to investigate the ways in which arsenic and mercury in the environment affect ecosystems and human health. We communicate our results to communities, grass-roots organizations, and state and federal agencies, and we train students to conduct research from both a clinical and community-based perspective. We hope you will be inspired to ask questions about our work, and will learn about the ways these metals may affect your health.

Events

March 18-20, 2018 Session on Private Wells at US Geological Society of America Meeting

The event will be an excellent opportunity for professionals working in the field of private wells to discuss current research and policy programs, share educational approaches and materials, and interact with one another. For more information on the conference, or to register, please visit the website.

March 26-27, 2018 NE Regional SRP Meeting in Woods Hole, MA

The March 26-27 NE Regional SRP Meeting in Woods Hole, MA will bring together the eight Superfund Research Program (SRP) Centers in the northeast for two days for scientific sessions and a special focus on trainee development. It will be attended by faculty and trainees from all of the NE SRPs including: BU, Northeastern, Dartmouth, Brown, Penn, MIT, Columbia, and URI. For additional information.

More Events...

What's New

Bruce Stanton and Kathrin Lawlor Interviewed on Arsenic and Private Wells

Dartmouth Superfund Program Director Bruce Stanton and Community Engagement Core Coordinator Kathrin Lawlor were interviewed for a story in The Dartmouth on arsenic in private wells.

Celia Chen Interviewed on Minamata Convention

Dartmouth Superfund Program researcher Celia Chen was interviewed for the Dartmouth show, The Brief, about mercury and the Minamata Convention. The segment aired on January 27 on SiriusXM Channel 121. A clip can be found here.

NH Arsenic Consortium Communicates Risk of Arsenic in Food and Water

A major goal of the NH Arsenic Consortium, which includes Dartmouth researchers, is to communicate the health risks of arsenic in food and water. The Consortium meets annually to share research findings and outreach efforts. An article in NH Business Review highlights these health risks and quotes Dartmouth Superfund Program Director Bruce Stanton on the dangers.

30th Anniversary of Superfund Research Program Celebrated at Annual Meeting

The 30th anniversary of the NIEHS Superfund Research Program was celebrated during the annual meeting hosted by U-Penn, Dartmouth and Northeastern Superfund Program Centers in Philadelphia December 6-8. Past trainees were invited back to participate in the meeting and the opening keynote was given by Joe Shaw, Ph.D., former trainee with our program and ONE's award winner who spoke on “Mapping the chemosphere: Understanding our chemical world to improve human health and the environment.” Our Center was well represented with current trainee presentations and posters.

Latest Papers

Four Mercury Synthesis Papers Published

The four mercury synthesis papers resulting from the ICMGP 2017 mercury conference are now published online in a special issue of Ambio.

Paper Published on Toenail Mercury Levels Associated with ALS

Dartmouth Superfund Program researchers Celia Chen and Brian Jackson are co-authora on a new paper Toenail Mercury Levels are Associated with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Risk . The paper is published in the journal Muscle & Nerve.

More Papers...

Latest News

NEW!!Trainee Spotlight: Kevin Hsu, Ph.D. Candidate:

NEW!!Trainee Spotlight: Todd Warczak, Ph.D. Candidate:

Read more about our Dartmouth Superfund Program Trainees.

New Web Application Developed!

ScanGEO allows rapid meta-analysis of publicly available gene expression. For more information, refer to the Applications Note.

Well Water Community Action Toolkit

The Toolkit provides a step-by-step guide to help communities ensure the safety of private well water.

Mercury: From Source to Seafood

WATCH Mercury: From Source to Seafood to learn how mercury enters the seafood we eat, why eating low-mercury fish is important for good health, and how to keep mercury out of the environment.

Check out our Fact Sheets



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