Archives: Winter/Spring 2014

Jump to Section:


Winter/Spring 2014

The Winter/Spring 2014 edition of The Journal was the second edition to be put online. For past editions of The Journal visit the archives. For the current edition of The Journal visit our homepage.

Note from the Editors

Winter/Spring 2014

Dear Reader,

When discussion concerning The Journal first began, the editorial team was concerned with the monumental task of building upon the fantastic work of previous editors, Kate Mortiz and R. Jamaal Downey. Following the acquisition of an ISSN and The Journal's placement on the shelves at Duke, Stanford, Indiana, South Bend, and Skidmore, we attempted to expand readership and presence to an even greater extent. I am pleased to announce that you can now find our department’s publication available to the larger Dartmouth community at several locations around the campus, including the Baker Berry Library, McNutt Hall, Rockefeller Hall, and Sanborn House. In addition, I am extremely pleased to announce the launch of The Journal's online edition. Readers can now access and view back issues of The Journal, as well as photos that were not printed in the print edition, along with announcements and information regarding both the publication and the department.

There are numerous individuals that have made this current edition, both print and online, a possibility. I would like to first and foremost thank both Wole Ojurongbe and Amy Gallagher for their patience and their extreme support and encouragement. I would also like to thank Michael Beahan and the Alumni Council for their continued participation and their enthusiasm, the professors who encouraged students to submit their work, the team of editors who took time to read through submissions and offer valuable feedback and assistance, and of course those who submitted as well as the readers, without whom there would not be a publication. Lastly, I wish to sincerely thank Jackson Shultz and Goyo Amaro, Jr., the wonderful creators and designers of The Journal's new website. They have worked diligently and created a beautiful addition to the MALS online presence. I cannot thank you all enough.

When reading through and viewing the poems, stories, photos, oral histories, and essays contained in this issue I began to see that each of these pieces seems, in some nuanced way, to be concerned with the taming of a seemingly natural thing. To what extent can something be tamed? When questioning nature, identity, chaos, beauty, and history, should we attempt to control or are there times when we should let something or someone simply "be" and live?

It is with a heavy, yet simultaneously happy, heart that I graduate in June and extend my good-bye. I have very much enjoyed my time at Dartmouth, with the MALS family, and serving as editor-in-chief of The Journal. I hope that you enjoy this winter issue, as it is one that I have truly loved. My deepest thanks, again.

Sincerely,
Erin



Editor-in-Chief Associate Editors Editors
Erin T. Tiernan Amani Liggett
John Rodgers
Yuqian Cai
Robert Cotter
Henry H. Paige

Back to top

Creative Writing

The Creative Writing track gives students the opportunity to engage in non-fiction, fiction, personal essay, screenwriting, poetry and journalism projects. Below are the articles from the Winter/Spring 2014 edition of The Journal. Hover over the title of the article for more information.

Winter/Spring 2014

Poetry by Rachel Bates

Warm Earth
‘There’s no point in planting
if the Earth isn’t warm’.
A voice plowed by time and scented
with Camel cigarettes rasps to my young ears. . .
More . . .

Mason Jars
Nature's harvest sits frozen
in time.
My eyes still sting from the memory
of chopping onions for salsa. . .
More . . .

Quelled

Carmen Brady

Quelled
to a Nexus:
This is the seal over my heart,
A nexus to Carmel. . ."
More . . .

Old World Beauty

Bridget Herrera

"Her white fingers quarter child’s earthy crown
Each plot a nightmare of tangled naps
African roots coiled tightly against her breast
Pale mother tills the knotted mess. . ."
More . . .

The Girl Who Destroyed the World

Amani Liggett

At first, I could only think of the personal benefits that could come from pushing the button that would essentially re-write history.

It was an extremely powerful thing, and it went straight to my ego. One push of a button, and I could make all of the immensely disappointing things about human civilization disappear. Vonnegut said it was embarrassing to be human, and I agreed wholeheartedly. . .

More . . .

Blood

Kate Moritz

At midnight the snow slowed to a swirl and a gentle hush swept over the drifts, the bare trees, and the waiting car. Inside sat a woman and her daughter. The mother, leaning back in her seat, watched the flakes fall, both her hands on the steering wheel, her elbows locked. She seemed to be trying to push herself backwards, away from the windshield, the snow, and the night. Her daughter Lucy reclined more comfortably. She slouched, her right arm resting on the inside car door as she twirled locks of penny colored hair around her pointer finger. Every time she released a curl, it bounced and then came to rest on the ridge of her scarf.

"Stop worrying Mom, it’s going to be fine. They should be here soon, shouldn’t they?"

More . . .

Back to top

Cultural Studies

The Cultural Studies track allows students to explore diverse fields such as gender studies, ethnic studies, media & performance studies, post-colonial studies and many other topics. Below are the articles from the Winter/Spring 2014 edition of The Journal. Hover over the title of the article for more information.

Fall 2014

A House is Not Always a Home: An Oral History of LGBTQ Youth Homelessness

Kristopher Shultz
In a recent study completed by National Gay and Lesbian Task Force, of all of the youth who are homeless, as many as 40% of those youth identify as LGBT. Often, when youth disclose an LGBT identity to their families, conflict erupts at home. Homeless youth most often cite familial conflict and intolerance of their identity as the primary reason for their homelessness.

I began this project expecting to hear a series of very similar stories. I expected to find LGBT adults who had experienced homelessness in their youth after coming out to their parents. I imagined a scared adolescent sitting at the dinner table, telling their parents he or she was gay, and having his or her parents be unable or unwilling to accept this new information about their child. This is not the trajectory I encountered. More . . .

Back to top

Globalization Studies

The Globalization Studies track provides students with the option of exploring government, war & peace, politics, public policy, sociology, and anthropology using a global lens. Below are the articles from the Winter/Spring 2014 edition of The Journal. Hover over the title of the article for more information.

Winter/Spring 2014

Cosmopolitanism and Globalization: A Project of Collectivity

Keely Badger
The moral imagination of global civil society extends beyond the parochialism of the bordered nation-state. It manifests itself as the face of a new cosmopolitanism. Does it have the potential to transform the third millennium? Indeed, the acceleration of globalization's revolutionizing of space and time, and the "intensification of worldwide social relations, which link distant localities" (Giddens, 64) has established a global network of information and exchange unlike that of any other era. More . . .

Kitaku Nanmin, Returning Refugees: Fukushima Daiichi response and the Ethics and Aesthetics of Biomedical Citizenship in Japan

Janak Padhiar
Rushed footprints "now frozen in the [fortified] mud" hauntingly expose the evacuees' stamp imprinted sharply—yet delicately—against the paved, sludge road immortalizing the disaster that hit the Tohoku region of Japan on 11 March 2011 at 14:46 JST (Guttenfelder, "Japan's Nuclear Refugee" for National Geographic Magazine) . David Gunttenfelder, Associated Press Chief Photographer (Asia), documented a photo narrative of the subsequent events following the double disaster - that is, the earthquake and the tsunami that severely damaged the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant causing not only a widespread radioactive contamination of the Japanese mainland amidst the nuclear meltdown crisis, but also massive confusion and chaos in the surrounding island region. Guttenfelder's visual record of the aesthetics of destruction reveal the devastation of the abandoned town of Namie and the toxic severity, which is not immediate to the naked eye. More . . .

Controlling Chaos? The Struggle with New Media in South Korea

John Rodgers
"It's ordered chaos," my father said as we stepped out of a Seoul City bus following a frenetic ride through the metropolis of 10 million people, among throngs of commuter cars, taxis, trucks, other buses, motorcycles and scooters (which slice between the larger vehicles), military vehicles and police cars. The city buses are notorious for their part in and negotiation of the chaos, cutting across lanes to reach a screeching halt at a sidewalk stop where passengers (most knowing—to the second—when the bus would arrive due to a phone application that tracks the buses) hurry on before the driver darts back into traffic. If one were to look at those drivers, passengers, sidewalk pedestrians, there is a great likelihood that they'd either be on, staring into or holding a phone, a phone that serves as a perpetual connection to another chaos (perhaps less ordered), a chaos that poses a threat to the stability of a nation which already stands on a peninsula divided by war only 60 years gone, and halted with an armistice, its foe in the North a persistent threat developing nuclear weapons, launching attacks at sea, and most recently, in 2010, shelling an island off the west coast. Imagining chaos is not hard to do in Korea—all one has to do is look at recent history or recall a rush-hour ride through the city's clamoring corridors. More . . .

Back to top

Liberal Studies

The Liberal Studies track is interdisciplinary in nature and allows students to engage in both directed and independent work on subjects that are not bound by the curricula of traditional disciplines.

Winter/Spring 2014

There were no Liberal Studies articles in the Winter/Spring 2014 edition of The Journal.

Back to top

Photography

The Journal includes photographs from students and alumni.

Winter 2014

Tyler Walton Mara Laine Tyler Walton
Mara Laine Tyler Walton Tyler Walton

Back to top

Contributor Bios

Authors - Winter/Spring 2014

Keely Badger focuses on the role of the United Nations’ efforts to champion international law and diplomacy around universal human rights, peacekeeping and humanitarian intervention. Her research and scholarship has taken many forms. Keely’s MALS thesis drew from the emerging discourse on youth politics in the 21st Century, bringing a critical discourse analysis to the UN’s stated goals of youth empowerment and international participation in the UN forum, and the fundamental gap between implementing these stated aims, from words to deeds. Keely is currently working working in development and outreach for Human Rights Watch based out of Santa Monica, California.

Rachel Bates is originally from Johnson City, Tennessee. She graduated from East Tenessee State University in 2012 with a degree in English and History. She is currently continuing with her avid interest in the written word through her time at Dartmouth where she is pursuing a degree in creative writing. Though her heart belongs to poetry, Rachel is hoping to branch out in to other forms of writing. She is interested in all things Appalachia: the people, the places, the education, what comes out and what seems to get stuck in. She also spends time as a teaching assistant for a freshman writing course.

Carmen Brady has had an array of experiences since finishing from Dartmouth with an AB in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology in 1998. She spent three years working as a juvenile services assistant for Child Haven in the Department of Family Services of Clark County, Nevada until moving to Washington, DC in 2006 where she worked as a Congressional intern in the House of Representatives. She transitioned to the Senate in 2007 with a permanent position as Constituent Services Coordinator for a Nevada Senator. When her time on Capitol Hill concluded in 2009, she had a decade of post undergrad experience upon which to reflect and was better positioned to make the series of choices which led her back to Dartmouth for grad school. She hopes that her time as a MALS. Creative Writing student will not only allow her to hone some of her underdeveloped creative gifts, but also build a bridge towards a career in helping coach and counsel others in the future.

Bridget Herrera is a part-time MALS student juggling life as a cashier at CVS and as a full-time single mother. She has a Bachelor’s degree from Dickinson College in the field of German Studies and she created a computerized program in Germanic Mythology as her senior thesis. During her tenure in the MALS program, her academic focus has been creative writing. Via this discipline, she has learned an eclectic style of writing, which includes dabbling in poetry, oral history, fiction and non-fiction. Each course has helped her evolve intellectually by providing a varying pallet of literary genres in which to develop her voice and style while probing deeper introspection. She is currently working on her thesis, a memoir entitled Root Awakenings.

Amani Liggett received her bachelor’s degree in English and Philosophy at UC Davis in 2011. Afterwards she worked as an inner-city reading comprehension tutor in Sacramento, as well as a grant-writer for a Sacramento-based nonprofit that focused on refugee resettlement, victims of human trafficking, and helping the financially illiterate. Amani came to Dartmouth’s MALS program in fall of 2013 and is currently studying creative writing.

Kate Moritz was born in Kirby, Vermont and has spent most of her life devoted to the stories of the Northeast. After graduating from the University of Vermont with a bachelor’s degree in English in 2010, Kate continued to pursue her love of the written word during her time at Dartmouth. Within the MALS program she studied creative writing and her short story, “Blood,” was included in her final thesis, a series of short stories entitled “Vermonters.” Kate also used her literary skills during her time as a previous co-editor-in-chief of The Journal. She currently resides in Passumpsic, Vermont where she is actively continuing to pursue her interest in writing and finding new forms of expression through poetry.

Janak Padhiar was born and raised in Denver, Colorado with a joint-family hailing from the rural village of Ugat, Gujarat, India. From being raised in the West to moving to the suburbs of Philadelphia, he finds it is only natural to continue his graduate studies at Dartmouth in Globalization Studies. Within this concentration, Janak is interested in the broad fields of economics, migration studies, development studies, place/space, and refugee studies. He completed his undergraduate degree with Honors in Sociology modified by Environmental Studies and Politics and International Affairs at Wake Forest University in 2013. Apart from my studies, I am also a recreational lacrosse and squash enthusiast along with traveling all over the world. He plans to take this interdisciplinary spirit with him at the University of Oxford in October 2014 as a doctoral student in the School of Geography and International Development.

John M. Rodgers taught high school English for a number of years at Daewon Foreign High School in Seoul, Korea before returning to his home state of New Hampshire to attend Dartmouth College. John also served as a writer and editor for several publications in Korea including 3WM and Groove Magazine where he currently serves as editor-at-large. He has written for the International Herald Tribune, the New York Times, the Asia Times, The Korea Herald and the Korea Times, among others. He is focusing on second-language education, and composition here at the College, and he is working with the international section of freshman composition.

Kristopher Shultz was born in Washington where he first became involved in safer-sex outreach and HIV/AIDS prevention. Extremely committed to promoting LGBTQI education and programs, Kristopher is the Education Director of the non-profit organization TEACH Alliance, a group dedicated to providing workshops and presentations around the country to cover such topics as safe zone trainings, queer sexual assault support groups, foster parenting, homeless shelter accessibility, healthcare, and writing. His interests include issues of queer youth homelessness and creating more accessible homeless shelters and campus environments. He is currently in the process of completing his degree in cultural studies.

Editors - Winter/Spring 2014

Editor-in-Chief

Erin Tiernan - Originally from St. Louis, Missouri, Erin graduated from Regis University where she received a bachelor’s degree in English and Philosophy. Afterwards she worked as a freelance writer and editor as well as an editorial assistant for several publications in Denver, Colorado. Erin came to Dartmouth’s MALS program in the fall of 2012 and is currently working on her thesis regarding modern Irish American writing in Boston and its role in modern cultural studies and literary studies.

Associate Editors

Amani Liggett received her bachelor’s degree in English and Philosophy at UC Davis in 2011. Afterwards she worked as an inner-city reading comprehension tutor in Sacramento, as well as a grant-writer for a Sacramento-based nonprofit that focused on refugee resettlement, victims of human trafficking, and helping the financially illiterate. Amani came to Dartmouth’s MALS program in fall of 2013 and is currently studying creative writing.

John M. Rodgers taught high school English for a number of years at Daewon Language Foreign High School in Seoul, Korea before returning to his home state of New Hampshire to attend Dartmouth College. John also served as a writer and editor for several publications in Korea including 3WM and Groove Magazine where he currently serves as editor-at-large. He has written for the International Herald Tribune, the New York Times, the Asia Times, The Korea Herald and the Korea Times, among others. He is focusing on second-language education, and composition here at the College, and he is working with the international section of freshman composition.

Editors

Yuqian Cai enrolled in MALS this past summer and now is halfway toward completing the Creative Writing Concentration. Studying writing with Prof. Kreiger, Lelchuk, and Hebert, he plans to submit a collection of short stories for his master thesis. Prior to coming to Dartmouth, Yuqian lived in Suzhou (his hometown) and Beijing, and studied in Michigan, Vermont, Germany, and Greece. Though he majored in Philosophy until his senior year, he graduated last year magna cum laude in Classical Civilization from Kalamazoo College, which he chose partly because he fancied the college's name, as if it were an amalgam of a Russian novel and a Native American tale. Apart from creative writing, his interests range from music and political philosophy to archaeology and comparative poetics, and he conducted a series of interviews with a dozen ex-ambassadors in 2012, two of which are published in the Chinese Journal of Cold War International History Studies last December. This winter in New Hampshire, he enjoys staring at the trembling and tranquilizing snowflakes, which dance down from heaven.

Robert Cotter - Originally from Philadelphia, Rob earned his B.A. at Ursinus College, where he studied philosophy and English. Rob's current research interests focus on issues in ethics, logic, and theories of practical reason. When he isn't doing philosophy, Rob also serves as a graduate TA in writing composition courses for Dartmouth freshmen.

Henry Paige is a MALSian on the Cultural Studies track. He joined Dartmouth after teaching middle school in Boston Public Schools for 8 years. Under the name of H. Hassan Paige, he has published a book of poetry entitled, “Prometheus deMannequin in Looking for Love” as part of a series he is currently working on.

Web Team - Winter/Spring 2014

Goyo Amaro is an art director with a hand in print, web, and socially conscious video game design. Goyo has led creative teams in both North and South America and has worked on a diverse range of projects from identity systems, periodical design and packaging to exhibits, events, and web sites. He’s currently the art director with the Dartmouth College Office of Advancement Communications design team. He received a BFA in Graphic Design and Packaging from Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California. Between, work, family, and play, Goyo is pursuing his M.A.L.S. General Liberal Studies degree.

Jack Shultz is a web designer, safer-sex educator, MALS student, LGBTQI activist, and all around trivia geek. He currently works as a web programmer and analyst for the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, while he completes his MALS thesis on transgender oral histories. Jack also teaches downhill skiing at Whaleback Mountain and serves as the Outreach Coordinator for the Trans* Education, Activism, Community & Health (TEACH) Alliance. Prior to relocating to the Upper Valley, he received his BA in Women's Studies from Washington State University. His academic interests include oral histories of marginalized communities, the triad of men's violence, access to information technologies and the uses of social networking in community creation, men's role in sexual assault prevention, representations of transmasculinities, and technology and internet law.

Back to top