Lorie Loeb

Dartmouth College

Lorie is a Professor in the computer science department at Dartmouth College, Director of the Digital Arts Program, the Executive Director of the Digital Arts Leadership and Innovation (DALI) Lab. She is also the President/co-Founder of TellEmotion, Inc, a social entrepreneurship start-up aimed and motivating people to change behavior and conserve resources. Before coming to Dartmouth, Lorie was Senior Research Scientist in the Computer Science Department at Stanford University. She holds two patents, is the recipient of the
Fulbright and the Whiting Foundation Fellowships. Lorie is an artist as well as a technologist. Films she worked on were awarded two Emmy Awards, and a Cine Golden Eagle Award. Films she animated have had screenings at the Museum of Modern Art, the Sundance Film Festival, the NY Film Festival, the London Film Festival and the Whitney Biennial.
At the DALI Lab, students design and develop technology tools that merge arts, science, design and technology in ways that help people communicate complex data in meaningful ways.

Billy Peters

Dartmouth College

Billy is a Dartmouth ’16.

Dartmouth Humanitarian Engineering

Dartmouth College

Dartmouth Humanitarian Engineering (DHE) is an award-winning, impact-driven group of university students at Dartmouth College in Hanover, NH. DHE runs a wide range of technical projects in developing nations, including small-scale hydropower, improved cookstoves, and an initiative aimed at improving access to clean water. We strive to encourage development, improve health, and reduce environmental impact through sustainable, affordable, socially-conscious solutions for communities in need. In order to ensure long-term sustainability, DHE partners with local NGOs and technical schools to design appropriate technologies using available resources. DHE emphasizes community involvement and collaboration on every level to foster local investment its projects.

Tray Bien

Dartmouth College

“We are Dartmouth College engineering students who were determined to find a smarter solution to the standard serving tray. We developed our tray alongside waitstaff in local restaurants, receiving direct user input throughout the design process. After several iterations and rounds of prototyping, we created the ultimate serving tray. In Tray Bien, glasses sink into the holes, lowering the center of gravity and locking them in place. Tray Bien is stable, maneuverable, and worry-free from the pour to the first sip. Our slotted design allows both stemware and cups to slide out effortlessly. Our patent-pending trays are dishwasher safe and easy to stack and store. Tray Bien eliminates the mobility and portability challenges associated with serving, removing an element of negative pressure from an already stressful workplace. Just envision: no risk of shattered glass or spilled drinks. Furthermore, the neutral wrist position is ergonomically sound, preventing wrist injuries such as tendonitis and carpal tunnel.”

Mshila Sio

YALI Fellow

“I was born and raised in Nairobi, Kenya. I have had the pleasure of working in sustainable water resource management for over 3 years with a focus on technologies that are viable for the African market and environment. Our organization Agua Inc. strives to bring economic, social and environmental empowerment through sustainable water and wastewater development projects. Water management is our continent’s biggest and most daunting challenge and at Agua, we work everyday to address this issue by providing low cost, energy and chemical free solutions that can be locally managed making them highly sustainable. I have had the honor of recently being selected by the U.S. state department as a Washington fellow through the Young African Leaders Initiative due to the potential our technology has to transform the way water is accessed and managed on the continent. We hope to make it not only easy to recycle wastewater but profitable as well so as to turn this waste product into a valued asset. We do this by using floating green filters, which is a plant-based biotechnology that is a highly effective and self-sustaining technology that uses nature’s capacity to purify water with complete respect for the environment. Our systems can provide cheap and safe drinking water of the highest quality in most areas of the continent and we hope to empower people by educating them on issues relating to sustainable management.”

Regina Agyare

YALI Fellow

Imagine a world where a girl as young as 12 years old is forced into early marriage, where her value is in her bride price and not her education, where she has no relevant skill to thrive in today’s competitive world. Now imagine that this girl lives in the slums in Africa with very few opportunities, role models and ways to economically empower herself.
At Soronko Foundation, our Tech Needs Girls project seeks to mentor girls to lead and innovate by learning to code. It is a mentorship program where young female computer scientists and engineers mentor girls and teach them to problem solve and think critically by learning to code. Coding is the language of the future. With this skill, the girls create apps to solve community problems, start their own tech companies or go through a paid internship and start making money which allows them to pay for their own education and economically empower themselves. Now imagine a world where the next Mark Zuckerberg is a 12 year old African Girl. We are helping to create that world.