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Research Projects 2014

Word Spotting in Handwritten Texts


Digital technology has made huge libraries of archival handwritten texts available to researchers, but they are often underutilized due to the laborious nature of word-by-word translation and indexing. Although current pattern recognition research has proposed a number of strategies for word spotting in digitized handwritten texts, it remains an unsolved problem. Using an application of Fourier Spatial Frequency Analysis (FSFA) for structure and pattern recognition in heterogeneous fields (Russell et al., J. Biom. Opt. 2014, and Pu et al., J. Biophoton., 2013), in collaboration with Distinguished Professor Robert Alfano and the Institute for Ultrafast Spectroscopy and Lasers (IUSL), we have developed an algorithm to automatically locate and index words to be used while preparing scanned handwritten archival documents for the Spanish Paleography Digital Teaching and Learning Tool developed by Anthony Stevens-Acevedo and Ramona Hernandez, Ph.D. at the Dominican Studies Institute.

Russell Group Student Researchers: Anson Chow, Casey Yoon, Tim Hardy Johnson

Fluid Mechanics of Drug Delivery in Cancer

Russell Research Group | Students
 
We are employing three key innovations introduced through recent collaboration between the Norris Cotton Cancer Center at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, the Optics in Medicine Lab at Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth College, and the Institute for Ultrafast Lasers and Spectroscopy (IUSL), at the City College of New York: whole-tumor mapping of nanoparticle flow patterns in tumor interstitial fluid from high-resolution histology; directional Fourier Spatial Frequency Analysis to identify the most influential barriers to transport within the tumor; and dynamic Fluorescence Multispectral Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging to characterize the permeability of tumors to nanoparticles. These methods will be used to introduce a framework for prediction of optimal nanoparticle platforms and adjuvant therapies for a given tumor, to significantly improve the delivery, efficacy, and outcome of applied nanoparticle therapy.
Russell Group Student Researchers: Milo Russell, Clyde Torres, Rifat Sakib, Irene Cifra

 
Native nanoparticles such as high density lipoprotein (HDL) can interact in interesting ways in different microenvironments. The effect of these interactions, such as jamming and phase change can be significant in the development of atherosclerosis, or as a complicating factor in the delivery of nanoparticle therapies, such as the iron-oxide particles trapped in HDL shown in the image above. A current challenge is to detect nanoparticle interaction in situ, to determine the effect of these interactions on surrounding tissue. The main focus of this project is to correlate particle aggregation as observed in TEM images to the characteristic Fourier spatial freuquency spectrum from laser speckle. In collaboration with New York Center for Structural Biology the Optics in Medicine Lab at Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth College, and the Institute for Ultrafast Lasers and Spectroscopy (IUSL), at the City College of New York.
Russell Group Student Researchers: Hawa Camara, Anson Chow, Milo Russell, Clyde Torres, Rifat Sakib, Irene Cifra


Pattern Recognition for Validation of Provenance in Heritage Science


Unknown or deliberately false authorship or provenance of cultural heritage objects (CHO) is an ongoing concern in the fields of sociology, art history, and commercial fine art, as well as for value-bearing paper documents and currency. Characteristic spatial patterns found in the microscopic structure of an object, such as a print, painting, or sculpture, can be uniquely identified using an application of Fourier Spatial Frequency Analysis (FSFA) for pattern recognition in heterogeneous fields (Russell et al., J. Biom. Opt. 2014, and Pu et al., J. of Biophoton. 2013, and patent pending). In collaboration with Institute for Ultrafast Lasers and Spectroscopy (IUSL), the City College Office of Government and Community Affairs. the Dominican Studies Institute (DSI).

Art from Science


Research methodology in the world of art is often strongly divergent from that in scientific disciplines. Although the nature of scientific publication is to present specialized information to a highly trained audience, art is more often created to reflect a universal experience for a broad audience. We are exploring the synergy of the intersection between these worlds by investigating the artistic form of physical data. In collaboration with Institute for Ultrafast Lasers and Spectroscopy (IUSL), Lynne Foster. and Cecilia Russell.

Russell Group Student Researchers: Tim Hardy Johnson, Cecilia Russell, Milo Russell, Clyde Torres, Casey Yoon
 
 
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