1998-99 DARTMOUTH

BIG GREEN SPORTS NEWS

 

Dartmouth Announces Endowment For Track

By Michael Mahoney '92

With the new academic and athletic year beginning, Dartmouth College is pleased to announce the first endowed coaching positions at the school. Effective immediately, Barry Harwick '77 and Sandra Ford-Centonze will be known as the Herbert '30 and Marjorie Chase Head Coaches of Men's and Women's Track and Field.

The endowment became possible following the recent passing of Marjorie Chase, who left much of her estate to the College with instructions that it be used to endow the positions. The bequest was in honor of the memory and in accordance with the wishes of her husband, Herbert.

"This is an important and generous gift," said College President James Wright. "Substantively, it will help to support our track and field programs. Symbolically, though, it underlines the important role that coaches have here as mentors and teachers."

The endowment, the first of its kind for Dartmouth, allows the College to follow the lead set by all the other Ivy League institutions. Many of them boast endowed coaching positions in a number of sports, a trend Dartmouth Director of Athletics Dick Jaeger would like to see occur with the Big Green programs.

"The Chases have made possible our first significant coaching endowment," he said. "I hope it will stimulate others to think about assuring the stature and quality of our coaching positions by creating similar endowments for our other athletic programs. It is a terrific way to combine loyalty, great generosity and enduring recognition in a way that has a major impact for Dartmouth athletics."

Herbert, a 1930 graduate of the College, moved to Etna following retirement in 1970. Long involved in College and class alumni activities, Chase became interested in the track program upon his arrival back in the Upper Valley and worked as a timer at many meets and trials during the indoor and outdoor seasons. He died unexpectedly while hiking on Smarts Mountain in 1979. Marjorie's interest in the program was also keen, and after Herbert's death she continued to support the program by way of several gifts, the most noteworthy being a state-of-the-art timing system.

Harwick - who also coaches cross country in the fall - is entering his seventh year as head coach of the men's cross country/track and field programs. He led the Big Green to Heptagonal cross country titles in 1994 and 1995, as well as the New England and NCAA District 1 championship in 1994. In track, Dartmouth won the New England championship in 1994 and 1995. Harwick has been honored by his peers as the NCAA District 1 Coach of the Year for the 1994 cross country season, the 1994 and 1995 outdoor track seasons, and the 1996 indoor track season.

"Much of the success of the track and cross country programs at Dartmouth is directly linked to the tremendous support we receive from our alums," he said. "The gift from Herb and Marge Chase to endow the coaching positions is the latest example of this incredible generosity - it is a fitting way to publicly show how important track and field has been in its century-old history at Dartmouth. The coaches are more enthusiastic than ever in their goal to make Dartmouth the pre-eminent team in the Ivy League and continue to produce All-America athletes."

Ford-Centonze is also in her seventh year as head coach of women's track. During her tenure, the Big Green has become a powerful program in the distance and field events, with four separate athletes earning All-America honors a total of nine times in events ranging from the mile to 10,000 meters. The women's cross country team has won four consecutive Heptagonal titles and finished fourth at last year's NCAA national championship, while the women's track team finished second at the 1995 outdoor and 1996 indoor Heptagonal meets and third at the 1996 outdoor Heps.

"It is definitely an honor to have the positions endowed by the Chases," she said. "I am happy for the entire track program, yet in a way humbled to have this tremendous honor bestowed upon us. Herb and Marge were long-time supporters, and in this way they have guaranteed that they will always be remembered by all of us."

The track staff is completed by Carl Wallin - the Big Green's long-time field coach who was greatly responsible for enhancing the Chases' interest in the sport - and Ellen O'Neil '87 as the women's cross country coach.


 

Ivy Women's Athletics Celebrates 25 Years

A series of seasonal special events (the first on October 17-18) and the selection of all-star teams in each intercollegiate sport will highlight Dartmouth's recognition of 25 years of Ivy League women's athletics.

While Dartmouth's first women's teams in field hockey, basketball, squash, tennis and lacrosse began organized competition with the advent of coeducation in 1972-73, the first Ivy League women's championship event (in rowing) wasn't contested until 1974.

Hence the silver anniversary celebration has been organized for the current academic year. The celebration actually began at the 1998 women's rowing championship regatta last spring. The major league-wide event will be a symposium and banquet in New York in April 1999 that builds on the theme, "Remembering the Past, Celebrating the Present and Embracing the Future."

Dartmouth will launch its celebration with a breakfast program in Alumni Gym on October 17 that is part of Homecoming Weekend.

In addition, a hospitality tent will be open before and during the women's soccer game with Yale on October 18.

During the weekend, Dartmouth will announce its 25-year all-star teams in field hockey and women's soccer. Similar events and recognition programs are planned to honor Big Green women's teams in winter and spring sports.

All told, athletes in the 14 sports in which Dartmouth competes for Ivy league titles, plus skiing and sailing, will be honored.

All women who have competed in athletics at Dartmouth since 1972 were invited to vote for all-star teams in each sport. The top two vote-getters in each sport become Dartmouth's representatives on the Ivy League Silver Anniversary teams in each sport.

The top Dartmouth honorees in field hockey are forward Kate Perle '88, the Ivy League player of the year in 1987, and goalie Lauren Demski '96, who holds nine Dartmouth records.

The leading soccer selections are forwards Chris Gates '89, a three-time All-Ivy first team choice, and Melissa McBean '97, an All-America and four-time All-Ivy first team member.

"We contacted over 2,000 alumnae and current student-athletes, inviting them to select the outstanding athletes in their sport," said Josie Harper, associate director of athletics. "The response has been excellent. In fact, I believe it's been better than at any other college."

A feature attraction of the October weekend at Dartmouth will be the special Ivy League traveling display of photos that recognizes some 200 outstanding athletes and teams from the eight Ivy colleges and includes an illustrated time line of women's athletics in the league.

The display is circulating among the Ivy colleges during the year. Harper is hopeful it will be available at Dartmouth's winter and spring recognition events.

During 1999, the Ivy League also will publish a coffee table book written by Dr. Paula Welch, a professor at the University of Florida, that commemorates and chronicles the first quarter-century of women's athletics in the league. (Stanford Phinch)


Comings and Goings

The summer once again brought numerous personnel changes to the Dartmouth College Athletic Department.

Probably the biggest news came with the retirement of two legendary figures, George Crowe and Kurt Foshey. Crowe -who coached the Big Green men's hockey program from 1975-84 and spent the last 12 years as the Big Green women's hockey coach - was replaced by Judy Parish '91, his associate/assistant for the last five years. Parish, in turn, named Mark Hudak as her assistant. Hudak has worked at the New Hampton (N.H.) School and was most recently at the National Sports Academy in Lake Placid, N.Y.

Foshey, the department's equipment manager for the last 24 years, was replaced by Mike Bissaillon, who comes to Hanover from Springfield College. Carol Pierce, a veteran member of the equipment staff, was promoted to senior assistant.

Meanwhile, Roger Demment, who served as associate director of athletic for physical education, fitness and recreation on an interim basis last year, was hired full-time in June after a national search.

Another prominent hire came in men's lacrosse, as the Big Green named Rick Sowell. Sowell, a seven-year assistant at Georgetown, hired former Washington & Lee assistant Lars Tiffany and Tim Brady to round out his staff.

Three other head coaches were named, as well. John Power, one of Canada's finest squash players and coaches, was hired as the Big Green's squash coach, replacing Chris Brownell '87. Kevin Gibson moved from interim to full-time as women's golf coach, replacing Izzy Johnson, while Peter Spaulding was tabbed as the interim sailing coach for 1998-99 to fill in for the now-departed Brian Doyle.

The fall sports boast a plethora of new faces on the sidelines. The football staff named Chris Adamson, a second team All-Ivy offensive guard in 1996, as well as Scott Sallach and Jared Elwell. Sallach, a 1994 graduate of Ursinus College, spent the last three years working at Monmouth University. Elwell, meanwhile, graduated in May from Rhode Island and captained last year's Ram football team.

The men's soccer staff added former Miami (Ohio) assistant coach Michael Devaney to replace Zach Rowles, while the women's soccer office named a new pair of assistant coaches, Erica Walsh and Lora Marzilli. Walsh was a former standout player at William & Mary who coached at Bucknell last year, while Marzilli played at Vermont for current Dartmouth mentor Kelly Blasius Knudsen '91. Finally, the field hockey program added Carol Knerr, the NCAA leader in saves at Richmond last year, as an assistant coach. In addition, Karen Collins - a former full-time assistant at Princeton and UNH - joined the Big Green staff as a volunteer assistant.

Men's hockey coach Bob Gaudet '81 added a former Brown player of his to the Dartmouth staff, hiring Brendan Whittet while promoting Jamie Rice to the top assistant's position. The moves were made to offset the loss of Brian McCloskey '77, who left to return to the University of New Hampshire. On the basketball court, Jay Tilton, a 1992 graduate of Hobart, replaces Mike Fulcher as assistant men's volunteer coach. In softball, former Seton Hall player Carol Sullivan was named as an assistant, while Molly McHugh comes to Hanover from Rutgers to take over as the women's novice rowing coach.

There was not much movement among the administration and support staff. Scott Roy was hired as a new assistant trainer, replacing Paul Edson. Liz Fagan, a former Dartmouth women's lacrosse assistant who spent the last year getting her master's degree in athletic administration at UMass, returns to Hanover as the department's administrative intern. Finally, Sarah Hood - an All-America women's hockey player for the Big Green last year - joins the sports information office as an intern.


 

At the departmental start-up meeting on September 16, men's and women's diving coach Ron Keenhold got a little more than he bargained for. Expecting only to hear a quick speech from interim dean of the college Dan Nelson, Keenhold was surprised when Nelson began his talk by presenting Keenhold with a plaque from the College Swimming Coaches Association for 40 years of service.


 

Scott Blackmun '79, a former soccer player for the Big Green, was recently named General Counsel and Director of Legal Affairs for the United States Olympic Committee.

Blackmun has been with the Colorado Springs office of the law firm of Hogan & Hartson, LLP, as a managing partner since 1994. He began work with the USOC staff effective in mid-September.

A four-year letterwinner in the goal, Blackmun played in 19 matches during his career and compiled a 1.02 goals against average.

Tim Brady to round out his staff.

Three other head coaches were named, as well. John Power, one of Canada's finest squash players and coaches, was hired as the Big Green's squash coach, replacing Chris Brownell '87. Kevin Gibson moved from interim to full-time as women's golf coach, replacing Izzy Johnson, while Peter Spaulding was tabbed as the interim sailing coach for 1998-99 to fill in for the now-departed Brian Doyle.

The fall sports boast a plethora of new faces on the sidelines. The football staff named Chris Adamson, a second team All-Ivy offensive guard in 1996, as well as Scott Sallach and Jared Elwell. Sallach, a 1994 graduate of Ursinus College, spent the last three years working at Monmouth University. Elwell, meanwhile, graduated in May from Rhode Island and captained last year's Ram football team.

The men's soccer staff added former Miami (Ohio) assistant coach Michael Devaney to replace Zach Rowles, while the women's soccer office named a new pair of assistant coaches, Erica Walsh and Lora Marzilli. Walsh was a former standout player at William & Mary who coached at Bucknell last year, while Marzilli played at Vermont for current Dartmouth mentor Kelly Blasius Knudsen '91. Finally, the field hockey program added Carol Knerr, the NCAA leader in saves at Richmond last year, as an assistant coach. In addition, Karen Collins - a former full-time assistant at Princeton and UNH - joined the Big Green staff as a volunteer assistant.

Men's hockey coach Bob Gaudet '81 added a former Brown player of his to the Dartmouth staff, hiring Brendan Whittet while promoting Jamie Rice to the top assistant's position. The moves were made to offset the loss of Brian McCloskey '77, who left to return to the University of New Hampshire. On the basketball court, Jay Tilton, a 1992 graduate of Hobart, replaces Mike Fulcher as assistant men's volunteer coach. In softball, former Seton Hall player Carol Sullivan was named as an assistant, while Molly McHugh comes to Hanover from Rutgers to take over as the women's novice rowing coach.

There was not much movement among the administration and support staff. Scott Roy was hired as a new assistant trainer, replacing Paul Edson. Liz Fagan, a former Dartmouth women's lacrosse assistant who spent the last year getting her master's degree in athletic administration at UMass, returns to Hanover as the department's administrative intern. Finally, Sarah Hood - an All-America women's hockey player for the Big Green last year - joins the sports information office as an intern.


 

At the departmental start-up meeting on September 16, men's and women's diving coach Ron Keenhold got a little more than he bargained for. Expecting only to hear a quick speech from interim dean of the college Dan Nelson, Keenhold was surprised when Nelson began his talk by presenting Keenhold with a plaque from the College Swimming Coaches Association for 40 years of service.


Scott Blackmun '79, a former soccer player for the Big Green, was recently named General Counsel and Director of Legal Affairs for the United States Olympic Committee.

Blackmun has been with the Colorado Springs office of the law firm of Hogan & Hartson, LLP, as a managing partner since 1994. He began work with the USOC staff effective in mid-September.

A four-year letterwinner in the goal, Blackmun played in 19 matches during his career and compiled a 1.02 goals against average.


Defense Shines but Offense Sputters in Gridiron Openers

By Stanford Phinch

 

MAINE 14, DARTMOUTH 3

 

Maine played and lost seven football games with Dartmouth from 1906 to 1934 and was outscored 173-0.

Maine played seven minutes against Dartmouth on the Black Bears' spanking new synthetic surface in Orono and had 14 points. They expected to score a lot more.

Wrong. The team that was averaging more than 30 points per game and owns a 52-28 win over New Hampshire (remember, these are scholarship programs) was neutralized for the final 53 minutes by Dartmouth's "bend-but-don't-break" defense.

Though Dartmouth is 0-2 for the first time since 1994, this is a "glass half full" story.

As has been the case so often in recent times, the Green defense did its job.

Of equal note, despite a running game that is below par due to injuries - the bulk of the work has gone to senior tailback Eric Davis (Weimar, Texas) who might as well have a bullseye painted around his jersey number - Dartmouth's offense showed it can move the ball.

Senior quarterback Mike Coffey (Creston, Ohio) won the statistical duel with his vaunted Maine counterpart, Mickey Fein. But for mental miscues (translation: procedure penalties), this was a game that decided underdog Dartmouth could have won.

There's a fine line between 0-2 and 2-0.

"I'm much more encouraged than after last week because I think Maine is a much better football team (than Penn)," said Coach John Lyons. "I think we made some progress offensively. We did some things against them."

Coffey completed 17 of 28 passes for 202 yards (Fein was 18-32 for 170). Nine of the catches were made by tight ends including seven by Adam Young (Concord, N.H.) which is impressive in an offense that expects tight ends to be blockers, not catchers.

Maine scored on its first two possessions with drives of 80 and 69 yards. The first seemed dead until Maine retained the ball after an apparent fumble at the Green two yard line.

Dartmouth then moved the ball with increased efficiency as Coffey mixed passes with option slants.

The Green's only points came late in the first half on a 23-yard field goal by Alex Csizinszky (Bradenton, Fla.) after flanker Damon Ferrara's (Morristown, N.J.) TD catch was ruled out-of-bounds.

Dartmouth had two excellent chances in the second half. Coffey's 25-yard pass to Forest Wester (Charlotte, N.C.) moved the Green to midfield but a procedure penalty killed a fourth-and-one-foot play at Maine's 42.

Midway through the final period, Brad Verber (Arlington Heights., Ill.) and safety Brad (Linwood, N.J.) stripped a Maine receiver (Eissler got the interception at the Maine 43) but it was lights out as the Bears showed their own defensive spunk by sacking Coffey twice.

"It took us awhile to realize we could play with those guys," said Lyons. "If we can continue to improve, eliminate some mistakes, and get some (injured) people back, we can be a pretty decent football team."

 

PENN 17, DARTMOUTH 14

 

Dartmouth opened its 1998 football season precisely as it closed the 1997 campaign: Playing tough defense and struggling offensively.

Against Princeton last November, the Green netted a skimpy 105 yards of total offense but scraped out a 12-9 overtime win.

Ten months later, on a sparkling September Saturday, 8,519 spectators (including one inflated Dartmouth moose mascot that made its debut at Memorial Field) watched the Green reveal another frustratingly economical attack that again managed only 105 yards by land and air.

What had been ample against Princeton was insufficient against Penn though, for awhile in the third period, Quaker coach Al Bagnoli had visions of another nightmarish visit to Hanover.

Penn controlled line play in the first half, scored on its first possession and made life generally miserable for Mike Coffey (Creston, Ohio), the senior quarterback making his first start.

At the half, Penn led 10-0 and had dominated play. Dartmouth had six net yards of total offense, no first downs and had spent two periods playing three downs and out inside its own 30 yard line.

The most impressive Dartmouth player in the first half was Wayne Schlobohm (Spring Hill, Fla.) who kept Penn at bay with six punts that averaged 46.7 yards.

And it was Schlobohm who turned the game around when his seventh punt of the game traveled 71 yards and was downed inside the Penn one early in the third period.

Now it was time for the Quakers to go three-and-out. Then Penn QB-punter Matt Rader bobbled the snap and shanked a punt that was partially blocked and rolled out of bounds at the Penn 15.

Two illegal procedure penalties were sandwiched around a pass that lost a yard, putting the ball back at Penn's 26.

That's when Coffey rolled right and fired a 26-yard strike to 6-4 wide receiver Damon Ferrara (Morristown, N.J.) who went above the Penn defender to give Dartmouth its first touchdown.

With Alex Csizinszky (Bradenton, Fla.) adding the first of his two extra points, Al Bagnoli's team was suddenly within striking distance and Penn's offense was sputtering.

Again the Quakers went three-and-out and another poor punt (20 yards) gave the Green possession at Penn's 42.

A seven-play drive showed Coffey's promise. The gutty senior converted two third-down plays, one on a six-yard option keeper and the second a 17-yard pass to Ferrara at Penn's 13.

On first down, Coffey kept on the option, broke a tackle at the line of scrimmage and dove the final yard to score.

In less than seven minutes, famished Dartmouth feasted on a 14-10 lead.

Dartmouth had a great opportunity for more after kicking off when cornerback Brad Verber (Arlington Heights, Ill.) tipped Rader's pass and linebacker Marshall Hyzdu (Cincinnati, Ohio) intercepted at Penn's 28.

But, two plays later, Coffey's errant pitch was recovered by Penn linebacker Jim Hisgen.

The decisive drive belonged to Penn's 240-pound tailback Jim Finn who carried 41 times for 151 yards in the game and scored his second TD as Penn regained the lead.

Finn carried nine times and caught a pass in the 14-play drive that stayed alive when the Green was hit with a dubious fourth-down pass interference penalty early in the final period.

Dartmouth had four fruitless possessions in the final eleven minutes and Penn escaped with its fifth win in nine games with Dartmouth in the 90s - and the fifth that's been decided by four points or less.

"It's frustrating to fight back so hard and then let it get away from us," said Coach John Lyons. "We did a great job defending bad field position in the first half. We were out there forever and only down ten and we were able to make that up.

"We had control and then we lost it...it was a tough way to lose."


Ivy League Football Standings

 Team  Ivy   Overall
 Columbia  1-0   1-1
 Pennsylvania  1-0  1-1
 Princeton  1-0  1-1
 Yale  1-0  1-1
 Brown  0-1  1-1
 Cornell  0-1 1-1 
 Dartmouth  0-1  0-2
 Harvard  0-1  0-2

If Week 1 was any indication, it's going to be a topsy-turvy year in Ivy League football.

How topsy-turvy was it? Yale, a nearly unanimous pick to finish at the bottom of the conference standings, defeated title contender Brown, 30-28. The Bulldogs won the game in dramatic fashion, as QB Joe Walland found WR Jake Borden for a 27-yard pass play that went for a touchdown on the final play of the game. Walland ended up 27-of-48 passing for 268 yards. On the other side of the ball, DB Nate Boxrucker recovered three Brown fumbles and forced two others. Brown QB James Perry completed 26-of-39 passes for 301 yards, including six for 64 yards to last year's Ivy Player of the Year, Sean Morey. WR Steve Campbell was Perry's main target, with 11 receptions for 125 yards.

What Yale did, though, almost paled in comparison to the 24-0 beating Columbia put on defending champion Harvard in New York City. It was the Crimson's first shutout loss since 1994. Freshman tailback Johnathan Reese was the Lions' top ground-gainer, with 72 yards, while Norman Hayes added 58 yards and a TD.

Finally, Princeton celebrated the opening of its beautiful new stadium with a 6-0 win over Cornell. A capacity crowd of 27,600 - the first sellout at Princeton since 1964 - saw Alex Sierk kick field goals of 47 and 37 yards on the Tigers' first two possessions, and the Princeton defense made those points stand up with a bend-but-don't-break effort. Cornell got inside the Tigers' 35-yard line five times in the second half but came away empty-handed.

Week 2 was not so kind to the Ivies, as everybody went out of conference and only two came back with wins - Brown (23-21 over Lafayette) and Cornell (17-9 over Holy Cross). Columbia fell to Bucknell, 27-20, Harvard was destroyed by Colgate, 34-14, Princeton dropped a 31-24 decision to Lehigh in overtime; Penn crashed, 34-18, to Richmond; and Yale was downed by Connecticut, 63-21, in the 49th and final meeting between the schools for bragging rights in the Nutmeg State.


Soccer Teams Off to Fast Starts

 

When Soccer America, the nation's premier soccer publication, released its 1998 college preview issue, the Dartmouth-Stanford men's game on September 20 was noted as one of five matches in the college season "Worth The Trip."

Several people took the magazine up on its suggestion, and on a day that could not have been more perfect, nearly 2,500 fans jammed Chase Field to see the Big Green defeat the Cardinal - coached by former Dartmouth mentor Bobby Clark - 2-0.

"If you scripted the weekend out for us, I don't think you could have written it up any better," said Dartmouth coach Fran O'Leary, who took over the Big Green helm when Clark left prior to the 1994 season. "We had great weather all weekend, we played well in front of a big crowd today, and we got a clean sheet against one of the top programs in the country. It could not have been a better day for the program."

Indeed, the win put an exclamation point on a tremendous opening weekend for the 15th-ranked Big Green. The day before, Dartmouth defeated Penn, 3-1, to kick off the UMBRO/Hypertherm Classic which featured the Big Green, the Cardinal, the Quakers and Boston University.

The event also proved to be a coming-out party for senior Chris Dedicik (Montreal, Que.). The lanky striker scored three times and assisted on another goal to lead Dartmouth to the title. As a result, he was named the tournament's offensive MVP. Senior co-captain Bobby Meyer (Franklin Square, N.Y.) was the defensive MVP.

The goals were a welcome sight for O'Leary, who knew that his defense would be strong with the return of three first team All-Ivy players but could be justified in fretting over who would score up front.

If the early season is any indication, O'Leary will sleep well this fall. After a preseason trip to Scotland netted nine goals in four matches, the Big Green has returned to American soil and continued the assault on its New World opponents. As a result, Dartmouth is 4-0, its best start since 1955.

"We are off to a good start," said O'Leary. "Bu we need to make sure we don't overlook anybody - there is no one on the schedule we can't beat, but at the same time they are all dangerous. We need to make sure we take care of business, and let things sort themselves out."


 

When women's soccer coach Kelly Blasius Knudsen looked at the first two weekends prior to the 1998 season, she admitted to being jittery.

"There were moments over the course of the summer when I had my doubts," she told the Valley News. "I know a few times I said to myself, 'Oh boy, what did I get us into?'"

Of course, Knudsen could acknowledge her apprehension with a smile - after all, she said it after seeing her team go 2-1-1 in the dangerous four-match kickoff.

While the men were hosting a tournament on Chase Field, the women did their male counterparts one better by hitting the road for a pair of early-season events.

At the Husker Fila Classic hosted by Nebraska September 11-13, the Big Green sent a message that it will be a team to reckon with by tying No. 20 Stanford, 1-1, and then downing eighth-ranked Clemson, 3-1. A week later, at the UMass Classic in Amherst, Dartmouth exacted revenge from a year ago on Colgate, 3-0. Since then, two more wins by shutout have pushed the women's record to 4-1-1 and lifted them to 15th in the latest national coaches poll.

Dartmouth's only loss has done nothing to sully the team's lofty image. At the UMass Classic, the Big Green drew level with No. 7 William & Mary two times before falling to the Tribe, 3-2.

"We have deserved everything we've gotten to this point," said Knudsen. "We came into camp in great shape, and we have not been intimidated by anyone. We may look young, but we have a lot of veterans."

Experience is abundant throughout the lineup. In the back, a stingy defense backstopped by goalkeeper Kristin Luckenbill (Paoli, Pa.) has allowed just five goals. At the other end, nine different players scored the Big Green's first 10 goals. Junior Melissa Roth (West Hartford, Conn.) netted a hat trick and freshman Lindsey Bergren (Orinda, Calif.) scored her second career goal in a 4-0 blanking of Princeton on September 26 to open the Ivy campaign.

"Our start is nice, but we can't let things go to our heads," said Knudsen. "We still have a lot of tough games, especially in the Ivy League, and we cannot afford to overlook anyone. But our success so far has been a nice boost of confidence. We now know we can play with anybody." (Mike Mahoney)


1998 Fall Sports Digest (September 11 to October 10)

 

MEN'S CROSS COUNTRY (1-0 Overall, 0-0 Ivy)

Results from Sept. 12-26: Dartmouth Invitational, 1st of 8; vs. Boston University, W 20-41; at Iona Invitational 2nd of 18; UPCOMING: Oct. 10 at Penn State and Keene State Invitationals.

Senior Don Conrad (St. Louis, Mo.) is healthy after being injured most of last season, and it showed at the Dartmouth Invitational. Conrad had a comfortable lead for most of the race and posted a time of 25:04.3, good for first place. Sophomore Parker Pruett (Birch Harbor, Maine) was 23 seconds behind. In head-to-head scoring between the two District 1 schools, the Big Green easily defeated Boston University. Conrad was fourth and junior Geoff Nickerson (East Derry, N.H.) fifth at the Iona meet.

 

WOMEN'S CROSS COUNTRY (1-0 Overall, 0-0 Ivy)

Results from Sept. 12-26: Dartmouth Invitational, 1st of 6; vs. Boston University, W 24-34; at Iona Invitational 2nd of 19; UPCOMING: Oct. 10 at Penn State and Keene State Invitationals.

All-America Anne Devlin (Wantagh, N.Y.) was third of 71 runners at the Dartmouth Invitational in a time of 19:51 for 3.28 miles. The Big Green also took fourth and fifth as sophomore Kelly Keene (Indianapolis, Ind.) clocked 20:09 followed by freshman Lara Niell (Harvard, Mass.) in 20:14. Devlin and Niell were third and fourth, respectively, at the Iona meet as Dartmouth was second to Wake Forest.

 

FIELD HOCKEY (1-4 Overall, 0-2 Ivy)

Results from Sept. 11-26: Kent State at Northwestern, L 4-2; Miami (Ohio) at Northwestern, W 3-1; at Northwestern, L 0-1; vs. Penn, L 3-2; at Princeton, L 0-2; UPCOMING: Sept. 30 vs. Maine; Oct. 3 at Brown; Oct. 7 at New Hampshire.

Dartmouth's win over Miami was paced by a pair of freshmen - Kate Alexander (Hummelstown, Pa.) and Kim Jenkin (Whitehouse Station, Pa.) - along with junior Kristen Leadbeater (Blue Bell, Pa.). Sophomore goalie Brittany D'Augustine (Auburn, Maine) made 10 saves in the narrow loss to Northwestern. Against fifth-ranked Princeton, D'Augustine made 17 saves.

 

FOOTBALL (0-2 Overall, 0-1 Ivy)

Results from Sept. 19-26: vs. Penn, L 17-14; at Maine, L 14-3; UPCOMING: Oct. 3 vs. Lafayette (WMUR-TV).

Junior Wayne Schlobohm (Spring Hill, Fla.) was named to the Ivy League honor roll with a school-record 446 yards punting against Penn. One kick went for 71 yards, the third longest in school history. Junior kicker Alex Csizinszky (Bradonton, Fla.) stepped in for the graduated Dave Regula '98, a record-setting All-Ivy selection, and booted two PATs against the Quakers. Dartmouth returns home on October 3 against Lafayette, with the second of four games televised by WMUR-TV, Channel 9 in Manchester.

 

MEN'S GOLF (0-0 Overall, 0-0 Ivy)

Results from Sept. 26-27: Dartmouth Invitational, 6th of 16; UPCOMING: Oct. 3-4 at Toski Invitational.

Chris Welty (Alamo, Calif.) recorded birdies on his first three holes and rode the start to a 66, enabling him to gain medalist honors at the Dartmouth Invitational. He's the first Big Green golfer to win this event since 1986. The junior tacked his 66 onto a first-day 69 to card 135, good for a one-stroke victory. Freshman Lee Birchall (Birmingham, Ala.) was 15th with 72-70-142.

 

WOMEN'S GOLF (0-0 Overall, 0-0 Ivy)

Results from Sept. 19-27: Dartmouth Invitational, 4th of 14; at Yale Invitational, 7th of 15; UPCOMING: Oct. 2-3 at Mt. Holyoke Invitational.

Junior Lauren Epstein (Syosset, N.Y.) tied for 17th with 82-85-167 at the Dartmouth Invitational, and senior Samantha Sommers (Wiscasset, Maine) was 20th with 83-87-170. At the Yale Invitational, junior Courtney Dill (Burr Ridge, Ill.) had her best collegiate tournament with 85-89-174.

 

RIDING (0-0 Overall, 0-0 Ivy)

UPCOMING: Oct. 3 at Colby-Sawyer.

The riding team opens the 1998 season on October 3. Seniors Cathy Emery (Fairfax, Va.) and Megan Phillips (Vienna, Va.) will captain the Big Green.

 

ROWING (0-0 Overall, 0-0 Ivy)

UPCOMING: Oct. 11 at Head of the Connecticut and Stonehurst Capital Regattas.

The heavyweight, lightweight and women's rowing teams have their first regattas on October 11. Dan Protz '98 stroked the U.S. double scull entry at the World Championships in Cologne, Sept. 6-13, and placed 12th. It was the first U.S. double to make the semi-finals since 1993.

 

SAILING (0-0 Overall, 0-0 Ivy)

UPCOMING: Oct. 3-4 at Danmark Trophy, Chris Loder Trophy, Northern Series III, Freshman Invitational, Lane Trophy and Bowdoin Invitational.

The Big Green women finished first at the Mrs. Hurst Bowl hosted by Dartmouth. In the Captain Hurst Bowl for flying junior competition, the Big Green was third. In the Man-Labs at MIT, sophomores Erin Maxwell (Stonington, Conn.) and Katie Lyndon (Riverside, Conn.) were first in A Division. The Dartmouth women are ranked first in the Sailing World national poll, and the coed team is ranked second (up from 18th a year ago.

 

MEN'S SOCCER (4-0 Overall, 2-0 Ivy)

Results from Sept. 14-26: vs. Maine, W 1-0; vs. Pennsylvania, W 3-1; vs. Stanford, W 2-0; at Princeton, W 4-0; UPCOMING: Sept. 30 at Vermont; Oct. 3 at Hartwick; Oct. 6 vs. Boston College.

Senior Chris Dedicik (Montreal, Que.) was named Ivy player of the week and offensive MVP for his three-goal performance at Dartmouth's UMBRO/Hypertherm Classic. Defensive MVP was classmate Bobby Meyer (Franklin Square, N.Y.). Joining them with All-Tournament honors were seniors Brendan Reidy (Oyster Bay, N.Y.) and Gareth Jones (Orleans, Ont.). Against Princeton, senior goalkeeper Matt Nyman (Westbrook, Conn.) earned his third shutout in four matches this season.

 

WOMEN'S SOCCER (4-1-1 Overall, 1-0 Ivy)

Results from Sept. 11-26: Stanford at Nebraska, T 1-1; Clemson at Nebraska, W 3-1; Colgate at UMass, W 3-0; William & Mary at UMass, L 3-2; Maine, W 1-0; at Princeton, W 4-0; UPCOMING: Sept. 30 vs. Syracuse; Oct. 3 at Brown.

Sophomore goalie Kristin Luckenbill (Paoli, Pa.) was named the Big Green's MVP at the Husker/Fila Classic at Nebraska. She had six saves as Dartmouth tied Stanford (then ranked No. 20), 1-1, and then made 11 stops against eighth-ranked Clemson in a 3-1 win.

In the home-opening victory against Maine, freshman Lindsey Bergren (Orinda, Calif.) had Dartmouth's lone goal. Melissa Roth (West Hartford, Conn.) with three goals and Bergren (with one) provided all the offense against Princeton as Luckenbill posted her third shutout of the season.

 

MEN'S TENNIS (0-0 Overall, 0-0 Ivy)

Results from Sept. 25-27: at Yale Invitational; UPCOMING: Oct. 4 vs. Vermont and Boston University.

Freshman Jeff Sloves (Aspen, Colo.) won the C finals of the Yale Invitational with a 4-6, 6-0, 6-4 victory over teammate Harlan Thompson (Dix Hills, N.Y.), a sophomore. Junior Andrew Evans (Rancho Santa Fe, Calif.) advanced to the finals of the B flight, losing to David Benet of Yale, 6-4, 6-2. Senior Erich Holzer (Houston, Texas) won the playoff for third in A singles with a 6-0, 6-3 win over teammate Rob Simik (Essex Junction, Vt.).

 

WOMEN'S TENNIS (0-0 Overall, 0-0 Ivy)

Results from Sept. 25-27: Cissie Leary Invitational at Penn; UPCOMING: Sept. 29 vs. Boston University; Oct. 1 vs. Massachusetts; Oct. 3 vs. Army.

The doubles team of Jennifer Dirksen (Los Altos Hills, Calif.) and Allison Taff (Weston, Mass.) advanced to the finals of the Cissie Leary Invitational, but fell one match short. Dirksen and Taff lost to the number one seed from Princeton, 8-5. Dirksen also advanced to the semi-finals in singles, but lost to the eventual winner, Penn's Anastasia Pozdniakova, in three sets, 6-1, 4-6, 6-3.

 

WOMEN'S VOLLEYBALL (8-2 Overall, 0-0 Ivy)

Results from Sept. 11-26: at UC-San Diego, L 0-3; at Cal Poly Pomona, W 3-1; at UC-Irvine, L 3-0; Hartford at Army, W 3-1; Air Force at Army, W 3-0; Fairleigh Dickinson at Army, W 3-2; at New Hampshire, W 3-2; Central Connecticut, W 3-0; Vermont, W 3-0; Providence, W 3-2; UPCOMING: Oct. 4 at Vermont; Oct. 9 at Columbia; Oct. 10 at Cornell.

Two Dartmouth players have been named to the Ivy honor roll this season - senior Danra Kazenski (Moon Township, Pa.) and junior Janna Merryfield (Federal Way, Wash.). The Big Green is 10th in the latest NCAA Division 1 rankings for District 1. For the first time in school history, the Big Green won its own invitational tourney, defeating Providence in the finals. Junior Anne Murray (Lawrence, Kansas) was voted All-Tournament with 19 kills and 14 digs against the Friars.

 


Trailblazers


Adam Young

Concord, N.H.

Football

 

Young had the best day for a Dartmouth tight end in nearly a decade against Maine on September 26. Although the Big Green lost to the Black Bears, 14-3, the senior tri-captain caught seven passes for a total of 109 yards. That was the most receptions for a Dartmouth tight end since Chris Keck '89 caught nine passes for 75 yards against Cornell on October 22, 1988.

 

Janna Merryfield

Federal Way, Wash.

Women's Volleyball

 

Merryfield was a second team All-Ivy pick a year ago. This season, she has already been named to the all-tournament team of two different events - the Army Invitational on September 18-19 and the Dartmouth Invitational on September 25-26. Spurred on by her play, the Big Green won both tourneys after an early-season trip to California and is off to an 8-2 start.