THE SOR JUANA INES DE LA CRUZ POETRY FILE

Searching Guide

This Guide will help you if you are using the DCIS Online Library application on a Macintosh.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Basic Searching

    1. About Online Library
    2. Getting Started
    3. Searching for materials
    4. Looking at your results
    5. Printing your results
    6. Saving your results
    7. Closing the database
    8. Other features: Online Help, Conserving memory

Advanced Searching

    1. Special features of Expert Search
    2. Constructing an Expert Search
    3. Using Boolean operators and proximity operators in Expert Search
    4. Modifying and combining previous searches in Expert Search
    5. Truncating keywords
    6. Stopwords
    7. Capitalization, punctuation and special characters
    8. Macintosh keyboard equivalents

 

1. About Online Library


Online Library is a Macintosh application that provides access to information resources --including materials in the Dartmouth College Library. The Catalog database contains information about nearly all items owned by the Library. This system also includes many other files, including the full text of Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz Poetry, Prose, and Plays.

This Guide assumes a basic knowledge of Macintosh vocabulary and operations. If you are not familiar with terms such as "double-click," "scroll bar," "window," and "menu," please read the manuals that came with your Macintosh computer.

 

2. Getting Started

Hardware and Software. To use Online Library, you will need a Macintosh computer with at least one megabyte of memory (2.5 megabytes are recommended) connected to Dartmouth's campus-wide network. The computer should be using at least version 6.0.5 of the System file.

You also will need the following software:

For instructions on acquiring these programs

see

Accessing the Sor Juana Files From Remote Locations

You must turn off and restart your Macintosh after installing these files onto your Macintosh.

Starting the program and choosing the Sor Juana Plays, Poetry or Prose files. Double-click on the DCIS Navigator icon. Scroll down the "Categories" column, and select the category "Literature." In the "Information Resources" column, scroll down and select the Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz file of your choice.

This guide will use the Poetry file as the example. There are complementary pages for the Plays and Prose files.

 

3. Searching for materials

The following searching examples will be taken from the Sor Juana Poetry file.

After you have opened the file, Online Library will present you with a search window:

The Sor Juana Poetry file has different indexes that you can search. The index names appear in pop-up menus on the search window (All Indexes and Text in the above illustration). To see what other indexes are available, click once on one of the index names and hold down the mouse. A list of indexes will appear. Drag the mouse down to the index name that you want, and then release it. The index name you have chosen will now appear in the pop-up menu.

ALL INDEXES
FIRST STANZA
INTRODUCTION
PAGE NUMBER
TEXT

To search for words in an index, click in the box next to the index name, and type the words you are looking for in the box. (You will see a blinking cursor in the box you are about to type into.) Then click on the Search button to send the search to the database. It is not necessary to fill in both boxes, unless you want to look for words in two indexes. If you do fill in both boxes, you will retrieve all the items that contain both the words in the first index and the words in the second index.

Searching for text. If you are looking for a particular text or for the occurrence of a word or words in a particular poem, type the word(s) in the box next to the Text index. The words can be entered in any order.

In the Text field, you can search for such words and phrases as:

Laura
estos versos lector
!monan vuchuilá
escalar pretendiendo las estrellas
Homero
Timoneyro, que governas
tla ya timohuica
pilico
kirkero
¿Tan grande, ¡ay Hado!

Click on the Search button to begin your search.

Searching for compositions. If you know what type of composition -soneto, lira, villancico, etc.- you are looking for, but do not know the first stanza, type the type of composition you are looking for in the box next to the Composition index. The system will find all items matching the name of the composition you type. For example, the word soneto will retrieve all the sonnets in the file:

Other searchable compositions:

décima
redondilla
lira
ovillejo
villancico
romance
glosa
epigrama
endecha
El Sueño
Searching for First Stanza. If you know the first stanza of a poem, you can search for that poem by filling in the stanza or part of the stanza in the box next to First Stanza. For example:

Searching for introduction. If you remember the words or phrases that the editors have used to introduce a poem, or the date of a poem, or the poems written in honor of a particular person or event, you may find these by typing the word(s) or name or date or event in the box next to Introduction.

Some examples of words, personal names or events you might type into the Introduction box are:

Marqués de la Laguna
Arzobispo de Méjico
cometa
Condesa de Paredes
1689
Santa Catarina
chocolate
Condesa de Galve
baile regional
Felipe IV

Searching for page number. If you want to find a particular poem and desire to consult the notes in the Méndez Plancarte printed edition, or want to know the position of a poem in relation to other poems, you may type the volume and page number next to the Page Number box. For example:

This search will retrieve materials in the two volumes dedicated to Sor Juana's poetry. If you type "I.284" you will retrieve the item(s) in the first volume. "II.284" will retrieve only the item(s) in the second volume.

Searching all indexes. If you are not sure if you are looking for a composition, text, introduction, or stanza, or if you want to be truly exhaustive in your searching, use the All Indexes index. An All Indexes search will retrieve your keywords if they are found anywhere in the Sor Juana file. The search ¿qué más will retrieve all instances in which the combination appears. It would retrieve ¿qué más as well as ¿qué and más.

Some examples of words that you might type into the All Indexes box are:

letra caeli
309 luz pura
villancico iglesia
bellaca achaque barraque
Iam Anima Verbo adhaeret
muerte) Morfeo
es muy de lo discreto--,
Musae-perito;
Searching tips:

 

4. Looking at your results

After you click on the Search button, the search name will appear in the status line in the middle of the window. The right-hand section of the status line shows the progress of your search.

After your search is completed, Online Library will display the first 50 items in a short one-line format. Use the scroll bar on the right to look at all the items that have been displayed. If you want to display 50 more items, click on the Show More button.

To locate an item from the Sor Juana Poetry File, look at the Poem format.

To display any item in the poem format, move the pointer (/) to the left of the desired item so that it points to the upper right and double-click.

To see all the items in the poem format, pull down the Display menu and choose Poem.

Display
Specific Records-R
Short-1
Poem-2

Short will display the first verse line of the poem.

To look at a specific poem by poem number, pull down the Display menu and choose Specific Records. Fill in the poem number(s) you want to see, and choose a display format from the pop-up menu.

Previous searches. To review searches that you have already made in this file, pull down the History menu. The results will be placed in a display window.

HISTORY

Discard Search S8: S3 and S6 (1 item, 7k)
Discard Previous Searches

Compact Search S8: S3 and S6 (1 item, 7k)
Compact Previous Searches

S3: filis or lisi or julia (8 items, 9k)
S6: comp endecha and text desdenes (1 item, 7k)
S8: S3 and S6 (1 item, 7k)

To select items in the display window, first move the pointer to the far left of the desired choice. Then,

To stop a search or a display, click on the Stop button or press -period.

Keep and Hide. You can temporarily remove displayed items from the window by using the Keep Records and Hide Records commands, which are found in the Edit menu. First select the items you want to keep in the display (see above). Then pull down the Edit menu and choose Keep Records. The items that were not selected will disappear from view. Or, you can select the items you want to remove from the display and then choose Hide Records from the Edit menu. To restore the complete display, pull down the Edit menu and choose Show Hidden Records.

This feature can be useful in preparing a window prior to Saving or Printing (see Section 5 and 6).

Window Preferences. You can change the way information is displayed by pulling down the Windows menu and choosing Window Preferences.

 

5. Printing your results

You can print anything that has been displayed in a Search. If you want to print the entire display, be sure no item in the display window has been selected. Then pull down the File menu and choose Print All. If you want to print only part of the display, select the records you want (see Section 4 for instructions on selecting records). Then pull down the File menu and choose Print Selection.

You can print to any printer attached to either your Macintosh or to the campus network. Use the Chooser Desk Accessory to select a printer before printing any selections.

 

6. Saving your results

You can save anything that has been displayed in a Search window into a file on your own Macintosh. Saved information can then be used by other Macintosh applications: for example, word processors.

To save an entire display to a file, be sure no item in the display window has been selected. Then pull down the File menu and choose Save All to save a new file, or Append All to add the items to an existing file. If you want to save only part of the display, select the records you want (see section 4 for instructions on selecting records). Then pull down the File menu and choose Save Selection or Append Selection.

You also can use the Macintosh Copy and Paste features to copy text directly from an Online Library window to another application such as a word processor.

 

7. Closing the database

If you do not plan to use the Sor Juana Poetry File for a while, it is better to close it. To close the database, pull down the File menu and choose Close. You can open it again, but you will have lost all the searches from the closed session.

 

8. Other features: Expert Search, Saving Settings, Online Help, Conserving memory

Expert Search. The basic search window described above allows you to search for terms in two indexes. If you need more advanced searching features, such as Boolean operators, parentheses for grouping of terms, or combining previous searches, you should use the Expert Search option.

Saving Settings. You can save your window positions for this database by pulling down the Window menu and choosing the Save Window Positions command. You can save all the rest of your settings for this database, including the indexes that appear in the pop-up menus, the Expert Search setting, and any preferences you have set using the Window Preferences command, by pulling down the Window menu and choosing the Save Window Settings command.

Online help is available if you pull down the Windows menu and choose Help. Note that the Help feature have been designed for general searches, not specifically for the Sor Juana Poetry file.

Conserving memory. If you perform a large number of searches and displays, your Macintosh may run out of memory. If the box in the lower right-hand corner approaches zero, discard some searches by pulling down the history menu and choosing one of the Discard options. Or, you can save the searches but discard the displays, by choosing one of the Compact commands.

ADVANCED SEARCHING

The basic search window described above allows you to search for terms in two indexes. If you need more advanced searching features, such as Boolean operators, parentheses for grouping of terms, or combining previous searches, you should use the Expert Search option.

 

1. Special features of Expert Search.

Expert Search provides more sophisticated search features than are available from the basic search window.

To use Expert Search, pull down the Search menu and choose Expert Search (or press -E). The search box will now change to a single large box, into which you may type complete searches:

To return to Basic Searching, pull down the Search menu and choose the Expert Search option again, to deselect it.

 

2. Constructing an Expert Search

To search for items using Expert Search, type an index name followed by the keywords you want to find in that index. Online Library will find all items that include all your keywords, regardless of the order in which they appear. For faster searching, pick the most unusual keywords you can, avoiding common terms.

You may use any index name that appears in the index pop-up menus in the basic search window. If you omit the index name, Online Library assumes All Indexes, and you will find all items that contain your keywords in any indexes.

As you type, Online Library recognizes index names and changes them into bold type. If you keep typing and your word is no longer an index name, then it will change back to plain type. If Online Library cannot determine the meaning of your search, Online Library will alert you by changing part of the search into outline type.

For example:

text lysi bella will find all items containing both the word lysi and the word bella in the text.

engaño retrato will find all items containing both words, engaño and retrato, in any index.

 

3. Using Boolean operators and proximity operators in Expert Search

In Expert Search, you can combine keywords in a search by using the Boolean operators AND, OR, and AND NOT, and the proximity operator PROX.

As you type your search, Online Library recognizes operators and changes them into bold type. If you want to search for a word that happens to be the same as an operator, surround it with quotation marks.

AND is used to narrow your search result. If you combine keywords with AND, you will find all items that contain both words in the specified index. If you do not put any operator between keywords, Online Library inserts AND.

comp soneto and text amor will find all the sonnets which contains the word amor.

OR is used to broaden your search result. If you combine keywords with OR, you will find any item that contains either one or the other in the specified index. OR is useful when you want to search for synonyms, or when you want to search for two things in one search.

agua or líquido will find all items containing either the word agua or the word líquido anywhere in the file.

Combining indexes. You can combine indexes using the Boolean operators or OR.

comp glosa or text maría will find items containing the composition type glosa or the word maría.

text rosa and intro cantar will find all items containing rosa in the text field, and the word cantar in the introduction field.

Parentheses. If more than one operator is used between keywords in the same search, Online Library performs the operations in the following order:

first: prox
then: and
finally: or

You may use parentheses to override this order of operations and force a grouping of terms.

For example:

text (razón or conocimiento) and mujer will find all items with a text field containing both razón and mujer or both conocimiento and mujer.

but

text razón or conocimiento and mujer will find all items with a text field containing the word razón as well as items containing both words conocimiento and mujer.

 

4. Modifying and combining previous searches in Expert Search

In Expert Search it is possible to combine previously completed searches using Boolean operators. To see a list of the searches that you have already completed, with their results, pull down the History menu.

HISTORY

Discard Search S8: S3 and S6 (1 item, 7k)
Discard Previous Searches

Compact Search S8: S3 and S6 (1 item, 7k)
Compact Previous Searches

S3: filis or lisi or julia (8 items, 9k)
S6: comp endecha and text desdenes (1 item, 7k)
S8: S3 and S6 (1 item, 7k)

Each search has been numbered with an "S" number. You can create new search results using these search numbers. In the above example,

S3 and S6 will find all items with the words Filis or Lisi or Julia and composition endecha and text desdenes.

You also can modify a completed search by adding more search terms. For example,

S3 and amor will find all items in search S3 containing also the word amor.

 

5. Truncating Keywords

To broaden your search you can truncate keywords using a dollar sign ($), or an asterisk (*), or using a question mark (?).

The dollar sign or asterisk specifies that any number of characters (including no characters at all) may appear in place of the truncation symbol:

herm$ or herm* will find all items containing words beginning with herm, such as hermosa, hermosura, hermosas, hermoso.

 

6. Stopwords

Online Library does not search for certain frequently occurring words, known as stopwords, even if they appear in your search request. The Sor Juana files have the following stopwords: de, el, en, la, las, los, con, y, a, un.

Stopwords are ignored when the proximity operator proxis used. The search

ceca prox meca will find such phrases as ceca y la meca.

 

7. Capitalization, punctuation and special characters

Capitalization. Upper and lower-case letters in your search requests are treated the same by Online Library.

Punctuation. Online Library ignores most punctuation, such as periods, commas and apostrophes. However, some punctuation marks do affect the result of a search. It is best to leave punctuation out of your searches unless you wish to convey the following meanings:

$ (dollar sign) or * (asterisk) indicates truncation of a keyword

? (question mark) indicates single-letter truncation of a keyword

- (hyphen) is indexed as part of a keyword, so Online Library will search for hyphenated terms.

" (quotation marks) indicate that the quoted words are to be searched as keywords, even if they happen to be index names or operators.

Diacritics (for example umlauts, diaeresis, tildes or accents) have been indexed, so you must include them in your search request.

 

8. Macintosh keyboard equivalents

Many mouse actions can be performed by keyboard equivalents.

Active areas. The active area of a window is the area where you can type or make selections, and it is identified by a heavy border. Pressing the Tab key moves the active area forward. Shift-Tab moves it backward.

Scrolling through the display area of a Search or Browse window. When the display area is active, you can use the arrow keys to scroll through the display. Pressing the up or down arrow scrolls one line at a time. Pressing -down-arrow or -up-arrow gives you the next or previous page of display.

Menu equivalents. Most menu choices can be made by holding down the key and typing a character. To find out the keyboard equivalents of a menu choice, pull down the menu. The keyboard equivalent appears at the right of the menu:

EDIT

Undo -Z

Cut -X

Copy -C

Paste -V

Clear

Keep Records -K

Hide Records -H

Show Hidden Records -J

Select All -A

Find -F

Find Again -G

Stopping searches. To cancel a search or a browse, you may press -period instead of clicking on the Stop button.

Differences between files

Although the Macintosh screens appear the same for all the Sor Juana files in Online Library, there are important differences between the files. Be sure to read the introductory material when you open a new file, to understand the contents of that file.

Each file has its own set of search indexes in the index pop-up menus.

Each file has its own set of display formats in the Display pull-down menu.

The available Indexes will vary from file to file.

You also will find that each file has its own structure. Some files contain very long records; others are very short. The Poetry and Prose files, for example, contain very brief records compared to those in the Plays file.

DCLOS Searching Guide

Adapted by Luis M. Villar
August, 1996

Next Screen