Publications by year:                     2011


Cox, R.M., M.C. Duryea, M. Najarro, and R. Calsbeek. Paternal condition drives sex-ratio bias in a lizard that lacks parental care. Evolution 65: 220-230.


Cox, R.M., and R. Calsbeek. An experimental test for alternative reproductive strategies underlying a female-limited polymorphism. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 24: 343-353.


2010


Cox, R.M., and R. Calsbeek. Cryptic sex-ratio bias provides indirect genetic benefits despite sexual conflict. Science 328: 92-94. Featured in Discovery News and National Geographic


Cox, R.M., and R. Calsbeek. Sex-specific selection and intraspecific variation in sexual size dimorphism. Evolution 64: 798-809.


Cox, R.M., and R. Calsbeek. Severe costs of reproduction persist in Anolis lizards despite the evolution of a single-egg clutch. Evolution 64: 1321-1330.


Cox, R.M., E.U. Parker*, D.M. Cheney*, A.L. Liebl, L.B. Martin, and R. Calsbeek. Experimental evidence for physiological costs underlying the trade-off between reproduction and survival. Functional Ecology 24: 1262-1269. Recommended by Faculty of 1000


Cox, R.M. Body size and sexual dimorphism. Chapter 117 in The Encyclopedia of Animal Behavior. Edited by M. Breed and J. Moore. Academic Press, Oxford.


Calsbeek, R., and R.M. Cox. Experimentally assessing the relative importance of predation and competition as agents of selection. Nature 465: 613-116. Recommended by Faculty of 1000. Featured in Nature News. Listen to podcasts from Nature (May 13) and Dartmouth


Calsbeek, R., L.A. Bonvini, and R.M. Cox. Geographic variation, frequency-dependent selection, and the maintenance of a female-limited polymorphism. Evolution 64: 116-125.


Connallon, T., R.M. Cox, and R. Calsbeek. Fitness consequences of sex-specific selection. Evolution 64: 1671-1682.


Gasc, A., M.C. Duryea, R.M. Cox, A. Kern, and R. Calsbeek. Invasive predators deplete genetic diversity of island lizards. PLoS ONE 5: e12061.


2009


Cox, R.M., and R. Calsbeek. Sexually antagonistic selection, sexual dimorphism, and the resolution of intralocus sexual conflict. American Naturalist 173: 176-187.


Cox, R.M., D.S. Stenquist*, and R. Calsbeek. Testosterone, growth, and the evolution of sexual size dimorphism. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22: 1586-1598. Cover photo


Cox, R.M., D.S. Stenquist*, J.P. Henningsen, and R. Calsbeek. Manipulating testosterone to assess links between behavior, morphology and performance in the brown anole, Anolis sagrei. Physiological and Biochemical Zoology 82: 686-698.


John-Alder, H.B., R.M. Cox, G. Haenel, and L. Smith. Hormones, performance and fitness: natural history and endocrine experiments on a lizard (Sceloporus undulatus). Integrative and Comparative Biology 49:393-407.


2008 


Cox, R.M., V. Zilberman*, and H.B. John-Alder. Testosterone stimulates the expression of a social color signal in Yarrow's spiny lizard, Sceloporus jarrovii. Journal of Experimental Zoology 309A: 505-514.


Cox, R.M., M.M. Barrett*, and H.B. John-Alder. Effects of food restriction on growth, energy allocation, and sexual size dimorphism in Yarrow's spiny lizard, Sceloporus jarrovii. Canadian Journal of Zoology 86: 268-276.


Cox, R.M., A. Munoz-Garcia, M. Jurkowitz, and J.B. Williams. Beta-glucocerebrosidase activity in the stratum corneum of house sparrows following acclimation to high and low humidity. Physiological and Biochemical Zoology 81: 97-105.


Munoz-Garcia, A., R.M. Cox, and J.B. Williams. Phenotypic flexibility in cutaneous water loss and lipids of the stratum corneum in house sparrows (Passer domesticus) following acclimation to high or low humidity. Physiological and Biochemical Zoology 81: 87-96.


Carsia, R.V., P.J. McIlroy, R.M. Cox, M. Barrett, and H.B. John-Alder. Gonadal modulation of in vitro steroidogenic properties of dispersed adrenocortical cells from Sceloporus lizards. General and Comparative Endocrinology 158: 202-210.


Carsia, R.V., P.J. McIlroy, R.M. Cox, M. Barrett, and H.B. John-Alder. Adrenal steroidogenesis in reptiles: insights from dispersed adrenocortical cells from Sceloporus lizards. Chapter 3 in Recent Advances in Non-Mammalian Adrenal Gland Research. Edited by A. Capaldo. Research Signpost.


2007


Cox, R.M. and H.B. John-Alder. Increased mite parasitism as a cost of testosterone in male striped plateau lizards, Sceloporus virgatus. Functional Ecology 21: 327-334.


Cox, R.M. and H.B. John-Alder. Growing apart together: the development of contrasting sexual size dimorphisms in sympatric Sceloporus lizards. Herpetologica 63: 245-257. 


Cox, R.M., M.A. Butler, and H.B. John-Alder. The evolution of sexual size dimorphism in reptiles. Chapter 4 in Sex, Size & Gender Roles: Evolutionary Studies of Sexual Size Dimorphism. Edited by D.J. Fairbairn, W.U. Blanckenhorn, and T. Szekely. Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK.


John-Alder, H.B., and R.M. Cox. The development of sexual size dimorphism in Sceloporus lizards: testosterone as a bipotential growth regulator. Chapter 19 in Sex, Size & Gender Roles: Evolutionary Studies of Sexual Size Dimorphism. Edited by D.J. Fairbairn, W.U. Blanckenhorn, and T. Szekely. Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK.


John-Alder, H.B., R.M. Cox, and E.N. Taylor. Proximate developmental mediators of sexual dimorphism in size: case studies from squamate reptiles. Integrative and Comparative Biology 47: 258-271.


2006


Cox, R.M. A test of the reproductive cost hypothesis for sexual size dimorphism in Yarrow's spiny lizard, Sceloporus jarrovii. Journal of Animal Ecology 75: 1361-1369.


Cox, R.M., V. Zilberman*, and H.B. John-Alder. Environmental sensitivity of sexual size dimorphism: laboratory common garden removes effects of sex and castration on lizard growth. Functional Ecology 20: 880-888.


2005


Cox, R.M. and H.B. John-Alder. Testosterone has opposite effects on male growth in lizards (Sceloporus spp.) with opposite patterns of sexual size dimorphism. Journal of Experimental Biology 208: 4679-4687. Featured Inside JEB


Cox, R.M., S.L. Skelly, A. Leo*, and H.B. John-Alder. Testosterone regulates sexually dimorphic coloration in the eastern fence lizard, Sceloporus undulatus. Copeia 2005: 597-608.


Cox, R.M., S.L. Skelly, and H.B. John-Alder. Testosterone inhibits growth of juvenile male eastern fence lizards (Sceloporus undulatus): implications for energy allocation and sexual size dimorphism. Physiological and Biochemical Zoology 78: 531-545.


2003


Cox, R.M., S.L. Skelly, and H.B. John-Alder. A comparative test of adaptive hypotheses for sexual     size dimorphism in lizards. Evolution 57: 1653-1669.


* indicates undergraduate coauthor

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Last updated

14 February, 2011