Education                                                                            


Ph.D.  2005    Ecology & Evolution, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ


B.A.    1999    Biology, College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, MA


                                                    

Research Appointments


2007-2010    Postdoctoral Researcher, Dartmouth College

                     Natural selection, sexual selection, and sexual conflict in lizards

                     Advisor: Ryan Calsbeek


2005-2007    Postdoctoral Researcher, Ohio State University

                     Physiological ecology of water balance in birds

                     Advisor: Joseph Williams


1999-2005    Graduate Student Research Assistant, Rutgers University

                     Evolution and endocrinology of sexual size dimorphism in lizards

                     Advisor: Henry John-Alder


1998-1999    Undergraduate Senior Research, College of the Holy Cross

                     Mating behavior and sex-ratio bias in newts

                     Advisor: William Healy


                                                     

Teaching Appointments


2010             Guest Lecturer, Vertebrate Zoology (BIO 24), Dartmouth College


2008-2009    Guest Lecturer, Animal Behavior (BIO 27), Dartmouth College 


2006             Lecturer, Evolution (EEOB 400), Ohio State University


2000-2002    Head Teaching Assistant, General Biology (BIO 102), Rutgers University


1999-2000    Head Teaching Assistant, General Biology (BIO 101-2), Rutgers University


1998-1999    Undergraduate Lab Assistant, General Biology, College of the Holy Cross

              


Grants and Awards


2011     George A. Bartholomew Award

             Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology 

             For distinguished contributions to comparative physiology and integrative biology

 

2008     Co-writer of National Science Foundation grant awarded to PI Ryan Calsbeek

             Adaptive mate choice driven by sexual conflict in the brown anole


2005     Best Student Paper Award, Division of Ecology and Evolution

             Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology

             A test of the reproductive cost hypothesis for sexual size dimorphism


2005     Harold & Anne Aines Endowed Fellowship in Animal Science

             Rutgers University


2003     Southwestern Research Station Student Support Grant

             American Museum of Natural History


2003     Grant-In-Aid of Research, Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology


2003     Dissertation Travel Award, Graduate School-New Brunswick

             Rutgers University


2001     Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Grant

             American Museum of Natural History



Selected Publications                                                    


Cox, R.M., and R. Calsbeek. 2010. Cryptic sex-ratio bias provides indirect genetic benefits despite sexual conflict. Science 328: 92-94.


Calsbeek, R., and R.M. Cox. 2010. Experimentally assessing the relative importance of predation and competition as agents of selection. Nature 465: 613-616.


Cox, R.M., and R. Calsbeek. 2010. Severe costs of reproduction persist in Anolis lizards despite the evolution of a single-egg clutch. Evolution 64: 1321-1330.


Cox, R.M., and R. Calsbeek. 2009. Sexually antagonistic selection, sexual dimorphism, and the resolution of intralocus sexual conflict. American Naturalist 173: 176-187.


Cox, R.M., D.S. Stenquist*, and R. Calsbeek. 2009. Testosterone, growth, and the evolution of sexual size dimorphism. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22 1586-1598. Cover photo


Cox, R.M. and H.B. John-Alder. 2007. Increased mite parasitism as a cost of testosterone in male striped plateau lizards, Sceloporus virgatus. Functional Ecology 21: 327-334.


Cox, R.M. 2006. A test of the reproductive cost hypothesis for sexual size dimorphism in Yarrow's spiny lizard, Sceloporus jarrovii. Journal of Animal Ecology 75: 1361-1369.


Cox, R.M., S.L. Skelly, and H.B. John-Alder. 2003. A comparative test of adaptive hypotheses for sexual size dimorphism in lizards. Evolution 57: 1653-1669.



Professional Societies


SSE  Society for the Study of Evolution


SICB  Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology


SSAR  Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles


ASIH  American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists

Robert M. Cox, Ph.D.              

Last updated

21 October, 2010

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