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Spanish and Portuguese Languages and Literatures

SPANISH

1. Beginning Spanish

10F: 8, 9, 11 11W: 9, 10 11S: 9, 10

11F: 8, 9, 11 12W: 9, 10 12S: 9, 10

An introduction to Spanish as a spoken and written language. The work includes regular practice—in class, in drill sessions, and in the language laboratory—in understanding and using the spoken language. Elementary reading materials serve for vocabulary building, analytical exercises, and discussion. Never serves in partial satisfaction of the Distributive or World Culture Requirements.

2. Introductory Spanish

10F, 11W: 9, 10, 11, 12 11S: 10, 11, 12 11X: 9

11F, 12W: 9, 10, 11, 12 12S: 10, 11, 12

Review of the fundamentals of Spanish, intensive work on vocabulary building, exten-sive reading and discussion. More advanced practice in the use of the spoken language in the classroom, the drill sessions and the language laboratory. Introduction to Spanish com-position. Never serves in partial satisfaction of the Distributive or World Culture Requirements.

Open to first-year students by qualifying test and to others who have passed Spanish 1.

3. Intermediate Spanish

10F: 9, 10, 11, 12, D.L.S.A. 11W, 11S: 9, 10, 11, D.L.S.A. 11X: 10

11F: 9, 10, 11, 12, D.L.S.A. 12W, 12S: 9, 10, 11, D.L.S.A.

Spanish 3 is the culminating course of the Spanish language sequence and is designed to continue the study of the cultures and languages of the Spanish speaking peoples begun in Spanish 1 and 2. TV programs, historical texts and literature provide culturally authentic materials, which in addition to the textbook, aim to fulfill the two main goals of the course: 1) to continue the intensive practice of listening, speaking, reading and writing with a cultural focus, and 2) to continue the intense study of grammar begun in Spanish 1 and 2 (or in high school). Given on-campus as the final course in the required sequence and off-campus as part of the Language Study Abroad curriculum. Special emphasis will be given off-campus to contemporary Spanish and Mexican cultural topics and social issues through the discussion of newspapers, artistic events, and mass media presentations. Never serves in partial satisfaction of the Distributive or World Culture Requirements.

Open to first-year students by qualifying tests and to others who have passed Spanish 2.

5. Language Study Abroad

10F, 11W, 11S, 11F, 12W, 12S: D.L.S.A.

Taught in the context of the Language Study Abroad program, this course in Hispanic culture reinforces listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills in Spanish. The thematic focus is on local and regional art history, with special emphasis on the city as a dynamic form of cultural production through time. Attending to political, social, economic, and religious contexts, the course features brief presentations by local personnel as well as relevant field trips. Assignments include conversation, writing projects, oral presentations, and a final course examination.

Prerequisite: acceptance into the Dartmouth Language Study Abroad Program. WCult: W (Spain), NW (Mexico).

6. Language Study Abroad

10F, 11W, 11S. 11F, 12W, 12S: D.L.S.A.

Taught in the context of the Language Study Abroad program, this introductory course in Hispanic literature strengthens listening, reading, speaking and writing skills in Spanish. The reading materials are selected to help students develop their analytical strategies as well as to expose them to relevant cultural issues and major figures of the region in which they are studying. Assigned work may include brief research papers, oral presentations, a mid-term exam and a final course examination.

Prerequisite: acceptance into the Dartmouth Language Study Abroad Program. Dist: LIT; WCult: W (Spain), NW (Mexico).

7. First-Year Seminars in Spanish and Spanish-American Literature

Consult special listings

8. Writing and Speaking: A Cultural Approach for Speakers of Spanish

11S: 11 12S: 11

This course is designed for students with a cultural background in Spanish who wish to enhance their skills in reading, writing and comprehension. Course materials will reflect a multi-media approach to understanding the cultural experiences of U.S. Latinos/as and the Spanish-speaking world. Assignments will be geared toward improving existing language skills and developing higher levels of academic proficiency. This course fulfills the language requirement for heritage speakers and serves as a prerequisite for 9 and/or all upper-level courses (30 and higher). With departmental approval, this course may be considered equivalent to Spanish 9.

Enrollment by permission only. Open to all classes.

9. Culture and Conversation: Advanced Spanish Language

10F: 10, 11 11W: 11, 12 11S: 10, 11 11X: 11

11F: 10, 11 12W: 11, 12 12S: 10, 11

This course serves as a bridge between Spanish 3 and Spanish 10. Through the intensive study of a variety of aural media (e.g. documentaries, TV and radio programs, films), grammar, vocabulary and speech acts as presented in the course packet, students will actively practice listening and speaking skills with the goal of reaching an Intermediate High Level (on the ACTFL scale). Additional written material may be added according to the professor’s particular interests.

Prerequisite: Spanish 3; AP Lang 4/5 or AP Lit 4; SAT II 600 - 680; local placement test 600+. Spanish 9 serves as a prerequisite for Spanish 10.

10. Writing and Reading: A Critical and Cultural Approach

10F: 11 11W: 10, 11 11S: 10, 12 11X: 12

11F: 11 12W: 10, 11 12S: 10, 12

This course serves as transition between the Spanish LSA (or equivalent preparation) and all upper-division courses (30 and above). Through the study of critical and theoretical vocabulary, and the reading of short stories, poems, films, theatrical plays and journalistic articles, students will acquire analytic tools to comprehend and analyze several types of texts. This course is also designed to familiarize students with different textual genres and a wide array of literary and interpretative key concepts.

Prerequisite: Participation in one of the Spanish LSA programs; Spanish 8 or 9; exemption from Spanish 9 based on test scores (see Department web site); or permission of instructor. It serves as a prerequisite for all Spanish courses 30 and higher. Dist: LIT.

23. Argentine Cultural Heritage

11S, 12S: D.F.S.P.

This course deepens the student’s knowledge of the Argentine art and cultures through the study and discussion of the visual, architectural and plastic arts, as well as music and performance. The materials will expose the students to the main trends and topics of contemporary Argentine art, cultures and society.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program, Argentina. Dist: ART; WCult: NW.

24. Spanish Cultural Heritage

10F, 11F: D.F.S.P.

This course deepens the student’s knowledge of the Spanish art and cultures through the study and discussion of the visual, architectural and plastic arts, as well as music and performance. The materials will expose the students to the main trends and topics of contemporary Spanish art, cultures and society.

Prerequisite: acceptance into the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program, Spain. Dist: ART; WCult: W.

30. Introduction to Hispanic Studies I: Middle Ages-17th Century

10F, 11F: 11

This course presents an overview of major literary trends and cultural productions from the Middle Ages to the 17th century in both their Spanish and Spanish American contexts. Students will read a representative selection of major literary works from that period, both Peninsular and Spanish-American, and discuss theoretical, aesthetic, and critical issues pertinent to the Renaissance, the Baroque, colonialism, syncretism, etc. Texts may also be cultural, visual, and/or filmic.

Prerequisite: Spanish 10. Dist: LIT; WCult: W.

31. Introduction to Hispanic Studies II: 18th and 19th Centuries

11W, 12W: 9

This course presents a chronological study of major trans-Atlantic literary trends and cultural productions, corresponding to the cultural and aesthetic movements of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Students will read a representative selection of major literary works, both Peninsular and Spanish-American, from that period and discuss theoretical, aesthetic, and critical issues pertinent to modernity, empire, enlightenment, nationalism, gender, democracy, etc. Texts may also be, cultural, visual, and/or filmic.

Prerequisite: Spanish 10. Dist: LIT; WCult: W.

32. Introduction to Hispanic Studies III: 20th-21st Centuries

11S, 12S: 11

This course presents a chronological study of trans-Atlantic major literary trends and cultural productions, corresponding to the cultural and aesthetic movements from the 1880s to the present. Students will read a representative selection of major literary works from that period, both Peninsular and Spanish-American, and discuss theoretical, aesthetic, and critical issues pertinent to modernismo, the avant-garde, revolution, post-modernism, etc. Texts may also be cultural, visual, and/or filmic.

Prerequisite: Spanish 10. Dist: LIT; WCult: W.

33. Argentine Civilization: Society, Culture and Politics in Argentina

11S, 12S: D.F.S.P.

This course studies socio-political events in the Southern Cone that have shaped the contemporary configuration of society in Argentina. Emphasis will be placed on key political figures, social movements, oppositional tensions, dictatorship and democracy, and their articulation in the cultural field. Prerequisite: acceptance into the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program. Dist: SOC; WCult: NW.

34. Society, Culture and Politics in Spain

10F, 11F: D.F.S.P.

This courses studies socio-political events in the Iberian Peninsula that have shaped the contemporary configuration of society in Spain. Emphasis will be placed on key political figures, social movements, oppositional tensions, dictatorship and democracy, and their articulation in the cultural field.

Prerequisite: acceptance into the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program, Spain. Dist: SOC; WCult: W.

35. Studies in Spanish-American Literature and Culture

11S, 12S: D.F.S.P.

This course is designed to offer students an opportunity to study a topic of interest in Spanish American literature and culture through the reading of a wide variety of literary and cultural texts. Emphasis will be placed on Argentina and the Southern Cone. Topics may vary.

Prerequisite: acceptance into the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program, Argentina. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW.

36. Studies in Modern and Contemporary Spanish Literature

10F, 11F: D.F.S.P.

This course is designed to offer students an opportunity to study a topic of interest in the literatures and cultures of Spain through the reading of a wide variety of literary and cultural texts. Topics may vary.

Prerequisite: acceptance into the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program, Spain. Dist: LIT; WCult: W.

37. Texts and Contexts: Topics in Writing

10F: 11 11W: 10 11S, 11F: 11 12W: 10, 11 12S: 11

This course is designed to help students develop excellence in writing as they prepare for upper level literature and culture courses in Spanish. Topics will vary according to term and faculty as will the “texts” studied in the course (literary, filmic, cultural, and visual). Given that thinking, reading, and writing are interdependent activities, Spanish 37 offers students an opportunity to study a topic of interest in Hispanic literature or culture while simultaneously emphasizing the advanced writing skills required of a research paper. Frequent exercises in writing and close textual study are basic to this course.

Prerequisite: Spanish 10 or permission of instructor. Dist: LIT; WCult: W.

40. Hispanic Literature and Culture by Period

11W: 2A 11S: 2 12W: 2A 12S: 2

This course will focus on the study of the significant historical periods and cultural movements of the Hispanic world. It is organized according to chronological eras that are marked by distinct cultural and literary movements. Areas covered will be the Middle Ages, the culture of the Renaissance and the Baroque, the Colonial Period, Enlightenment and Modernity, Nineteenth-Century Romanticism and Realism, the Avant-Gardes, Postmodernism, and new developments in the contemporary period. One or more periods will be selected for study.

Prerequisite: Spanish 37. Dist. LIT, WCult: W

In 11W, Lorca, Dalí, Buñuel: The Surrealist Imagination (Spanish Version). Few modern Spanish artists have been more visible and influential than the Catalan painter Salvador Dalí, the Andalusian poet and playwright Federico García Lorca, and the Aragonese film director Luis Buñuel. The course will concentrate on the development of the Surrealist project as manufactured by these major figures during the 1920s and its transformation and demise during the ensuing decade, when Avant-garde becomes more involved in politics than aesthetics. del Pino.

In 11S, The Rhetorical Zoo: Aesthetic Movements and the Representation of Animals in 20th Century Spain. This course will approach the main aesthetic movements in 20th Century Spain from a very specific perspective: the ways in which these movements have represented animals. This point of view will allow us to study the differences, for example, between Spanish modernism, avant-garde, social-realism and postmodernism, and at the same time to deal with some relevant issues related to the representation of animal life. Among these questions, we will explore the relation between animality and (political) violence, the interaction between sn some animals and different versions of the national identity, and the untenable opposition between rational modernity and its pre-modern/animal remnants. Reading of authors such as: Aldecoa, Atxaga, Borau, Buñuel, Cela, Dalí, Delibes, Hernández, Jiménez, Lorca, Rivas, Sánchez-Piñol, Saura, Tomeo, Unamuno, Valle-Inclán. Gómez.

43: Hispanic Literature and Culture by Genre

10F, 11F: 10

A literary genre is defined as an established category of written work employing a set of recognizable common conventions, such as technique, style, structure or subject matter. This course will focus on the study of Hispanic literatures and cultures and is organized around one or more basic genres like poetry, drama, novel, and essay. Other articulating categories for the course may include epic poetry, tragic drama, short-fiction narrative, the picaresque novel, and melodrama, among others. The course will provide students with the appropriate critical vocabulary to understand the specificity of the genre or sub-genre examined in the course.

Prerequisite: Spanish 37. Dist. LIT, WCult: W

In 10F, The Spanish 20th Century in the Novel: Social Criticism and its Aesthetics. This course focuses on how narrative styles—tremendismo, novela social, objetivista, experimental y detectivesca—read a particular period of Spanish contemporary history from the aftermath of the Civil War to the Transition to democracy years. Texts include: Cela’s La familia de Pascual Duarte, García Hortelano’s Tormenta de Verano, Esther Tusquets’ El mismo mar de todos los veranos, and Vázquez Montalbán’s Los mares del Sur. Aguado

45. Regional/National/Trans-Atlantic Approaches to Hispanic Studies

Not offered in the period from 10F through 11S

Prerequisite: Spanish 37.

50. Gender and Sexuality in Hispanic Studies

10F, 11F: 10A

This course will explore how the study of gender and sexuality is integral to understanding the complexities of Hispanic societies and cultures. In addition to analyzing literary texts and cultural and artistic productions, students will also examine theoretical and critical approaches to the study of gender and sexuality. Topics may include feminist movements, the construction and performance of gender, the theory and practice of women’s writing, sexual identities, and queer theories as they relate to Hispanic embodiments and representations in literature and culture.

Prerequisite: Spanish 37. Dist: LIT; WCult: CI.

In 10F, The Politics of Masculinity: Latin American Narrative and Film. This course explores the fictions of gender that found national identities and postcolonial dreams of liberation. We will study complex representations of masculinity in Latin American fiction and film in order to understand how certain ideas about masculinity subtend concepts of political legitimacy, and how some experimental texts critique those ideas. Readings include novels, short stories, and films as well as historical, sociological, psychoanalytic, and feminist theories of masculinity. Biron.

53. Topics in Spanish Linguistics, Rhetoric, and Poetics

11W, 12W: 12

The focus of study for this course will be the evolution of the Spanish language from its old and early modern manifestations to contemporary uses. Specific geographical contexts will be given special attention. Topics may include the constitution of Castilian as a national language and its relation to other peninsular languages; the history of linguistic change on all levels (phonetic/phonological, morphological, syntactic, and semantic); the influence of Arabic, indigenous languages of the Americas, English, and dialectal variants. Fundamental notions of rhetoric and poetics will be central to this course as well.

Prerequisite: Spanish 37. Dist: LIT.

In 11W, Spanish Linguistics, Rhetoric, Poetics, and the Politics of Language. The first part of this course surveys the evolution of Castilian language, with special emphasis on the influence of Arabic and indigenous languages of the Americas, Judeo-Spanish (ladino), Italianisms and Cultisms, Voseo, and the influence of English. In the second part, students will acquire analytical skills to understand the rhetorical and poetic architecture of major works of the Golden Age (Garcilaso de la Vega, Luis de Góngora, Fray Luis de León, etc). Finally, the course reflects on the politics of language by focusing on the history of Language Academies, the production of Grammars, Dictionaries and Orthographies, the relation between Castilian and other languages in Spain and Latin America, and the place of Castilian/Spanish in the United States. Cirnigliaro

55. Hispanic Literature, Culture, and Politics

Not offered in the period from 10F through 11S

Prerequisite: Spanish 37. Dist: LIT, WCult: W

60. Race and Ethnicity in Hispanic Studies

Not offered in the period from 10F through 11S

Prerequisite: Spanish 37. Dist: LIT, WCult: CI

63. Hispanic Film Studies

Not offered in the period from 10F through 11S

Prerequisite: Spanish 37. Dist: ART.

65. Hispanic Performance, Media, and the Arts

Not offered in the period from 10F through 11S

Prerequisite: Spanish 37. Dist: ART, WCult: W

70. Great Works of Hispanic Literature: Don Quixote and One Hundred Years of Solitude

Not offered in the period from 10F through 11S

Prerequisite: Spanish 37. Dist: LIT, WCult: W

73. Special Topics in Hispanic Literary and Cultural Production

10X: 2 11S: 10

This course is offered periodically with varying content so that writers, genres, historical contexts, or theoretical approaches not otherwise provided in the curriculum may be studied. The course can be offered any term and its distinct content, theoretical, or methodological approach will depend on the area of specialization of the instructor.

Prerequisite: Spanish 37. Dist: LIT.

In 11S, Todo Borges. Jorge Luis Borges is one of the most difficult and influential Latin American writers. We will study his literary trajectory including his influences (Cervantes, Kafka, Chesterton, Schopenhauer), his works both of fiction and poetry, his forgeries, his editorial work and literary criticism. We will also trace some of his arcane sources and read reflections by his critics, as well as the works of some of the writers whom he influenced such as Moroccan Tahar Ben Jelloun, author of the novel The Sand Child. Spitta

75. Creative Writing in Spanish

10F, 11F: 12

This course offers a workshop in creative writing to be taught by prominent writers in residence in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese. It is designed for native speakers of Spanish, heritage speakers, and Spanish majors in their junior or senior years. Seminar-sized class meets twice or three times a week plus individual conferences when necessary. The class will consist of group workshops on student writing (fiction, poetry, and/or theater) and individual conferences with the instructor. Students will be admitted on a competitive basis and should submit a short writing sample of poetry, fiction, and/or a play to the Department’s Administrator prior to obtaining permission to enroll. The limit for this class is 14.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (pending faculty approval)

In 10F: The short story involves all the major concerns of literary prose: plot, themes, narrator, characters, symbols, style, etc. Writing short stories provides essential practice for anyone interested in creative writing as well as in reading more analytically. This course combines the study of the history and structures of Spanish-language short stories (by Jorge Luis Borges, María Luisa Bombal, Julio Cortázar, Ana María Matute, Laura Freixas, etc.) with a workshop based on students’ original writing. Freixas.

80. Senior Seminar in Hispanic Studies

10F: 2 11W: 10A 11S: 2A 11F: 10 12W: 10A 12S: 2A

The senior seminar in Hispanic Studies is designed to provide Spanish majors with a small group setting that facilitates in-depth discussion of key concepts of critical theory, literary studies, and the discipline. The seminar will encourage students to research and explore relevant topics related to Hispanic literature and the arts and experiment with the application of the different concepts under discussion in creative ways (essay writing, visual arts projects, performance pieces, etc).

Prerequisite: Senior standing.

In 10F, Myths, Literature and Reality in the European discovery of the New World. This course will examine the changing European perception of the New World during the discovery and exploration of the American continent. We will discuss the role of dreams, myths and models in the transformation of America from utopian space into colonial reality. Topics of discussion will include: America: geographical reality and European invention; the New World as the utopian space of desire; discoverers, conquistadors and their Others; religious utopias and spiritual conquest; the proper place of women; the voices of the conquered; writing and power. Materials for the course will include maps, art, popular theatre, and writings by Columbus, Vespucci, Cortés, Cabeza de Vaca, Lope de Aguirre, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Ercilla, the Inca Garcilaso, Guaman Poma de Ayala and others. Pastor.

In 11W, Literature and Mass Media in Spanish America. This course approaches the fecund influx of Mass Media in Latin American literature and vice versa. Stemming from the analyses of three novels constructed with elements taken from mass literature and social stereotypes (Vargas Llosa’s La tía Julia y el escribidor, Puig’s Boquitas pintadas, and Valverde’s Celia Cruz, reina rumba) the course makes a critical revision of popular genres such as boleros, tangos, salsa, soap operas, etc. Bueno.

In 11S, Romanticism and Realism in Spain during the 19th Century. The course will concentrate on the turbulent beginnings of the 19th century in Spain by examining the challenges the country faced at the inception of Modernity. The artist Francisco de Goya and the writers Mariano José de Larra and Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer will guide us throughout the Romantic period. Realist aesthetics and the triumph of bourgeois consciousness and culture will be analyzed in the narrative work of Benito Pérez Galdós and Emilia Pardo Bazán. del Pino.

83. Independent Study

All terms: Arrange

A program of individual study directed by a member of the Spanish and Portuguese faculty. Spanish 83 will normally consist of a program of reading and research that is not covered in regularly scheduled course offerings. After consultation with the faculty advisor of the project, all Independent Study proposals must be submitted for approval to the Department. Only open to majors in Spanish or Romance Languages. Under normal circumstances, no student may receive credit for this course more than once.

Students interested in pursuing an Independent Study must identify their topic and faculty advisor, and present a proposal to their faculty advisor and to the Department for approval by the last week of the term prior to registering for Spanish 83.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

90. Honors Course

All terms: Arrange

Supervised independent research under the direction of a designated advisor. Honors majors will normally elect this course as the first in the required sequence (90 and 91) for completion of the Honors Program. Spanish 90 is intended to prepare the student for writing the Honors thesis, through readings in primary and secondary texts, theory and methodology. The course will include periodic written assignments and culminate in a final paper.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Honors Program.

91. Honors Seminar

All terms: Arrange

A prearranged program of study and research during any term of the senior year, on a tutorial basis, with individual faculty members (normally the thesis advisor.) A thesis and public presentation are the expected culmination of the course.

Prerequisite: Prior admission to the Department’s Honors Program; clear evidence of capability to perform honors level work, normally indicated by completion of Spanish 90 with a grade of B+ or higher.

PORTUGUESE

1. Introductory Intensive Portuguese

11S: 10/10A

An intensive introductory course that teaches fundamental communication skills—understanding, speaking, reading and writing—and introduces students to the cultures of the Portuguese-speaking world through readings, films, music and videotapes. This course is appropriate for students who may wish to devote only one term to the study of Portuguese.

3. Intermediate Intensive Portuguese

11X: D.L.S.A.

More advanced work in the use of the spoken and written language, complemented by lectures, readings, music and films. Portuguese 3 serves as the final course in the required sequence to satisfy the language requirement in Portuguese.

Prerequisite: acceptance into the Dartmouth Language Study Abroad program.

Never serves in partial satisfaction of the Distributive or World Culture requirements.

5. Brazilian Culture and Society

11X: D.L.S.A.

A course in Brazilian culture and society taught in the context of the Language Study Abroad program. Lectures by local personnel concentrate on contemporary political, social, economic, and religious institutions of the country, with attention paid to their historical background. Visits to sites supplement these lectures when appropriate. Assigned work includes preparation of papers, oral presentations, and a final course examination.

Prerequisite: acceptance into the Dartmouth Language Study Abroad program. WCult: NW.

6. Introduction to Brazilian Literature

11X: D.L.S.A.

An introductory course, offered in the context of the Language Study Abroad program, dealing with major figures, themes, or genres of Brazilian literature.

Prerequisite: acceptance into the Dartmouth Language Study Abroad program. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW.

7. First-Year Seminars in Portuguese

Consult special listings

9. Writing and Speaking: A Cultural Approach

11W, 12W: 11

This course serves as a transition between the basic Portuguese language sequence and upper-level courses. Through a selective review of grammar, vocabulary-building exercises, and readings and discussion of contemporary topics affecting the Portuguese-speaking world, students will develop their ability to write and speak clear, correct and idiomatic Portuguese in order to achieve competence in the language

Prerequisite: Completion of the foreign language requirement in Portuguese, or permission of the Chair. Open to all classes. Dist: LIT

20. The Portuguese-Speaking World and its Literatures and Cultures: The Definition of an Identity

11S, 12S: 11.

This course deals with major figures, themes, and issues of the literatures of the modern Portuguese-speaking world, including continental and insular Portugal, Brazil, Lusophone Africa and Asia, and Luso-America. The course will also present different techniques of critical reading and interpretation and their relevance to the study of specific works. Reading selections will be drawn from different genres and periods, and will be supplemented by film, music, and materials from the mass media. Considerable emphasis will be placed on speaking and writing skills. Topics will be announced in advance of each offering.

Open to first-year students by qualifying test and to others who have passed Portuguese 9 or have equivalent preparation. Portuguese 20 is a prerequisite for the Portuguese Foreign Study Program, and also counts towards the minor in Portuguese or the major in Romance Languages and modified majors. Dist: LIT.

25. Advanced Portuguese Composition

11X: D.F.S.P.

Intensive essay writing workshop with discussion focusing on Brazilian culture. Advanced grammar, sentence structure and word usage provide a framework for excellence in writing. Exercises are based on readings of materials from diverse sources in contemporary Brazilian culture, history, politics and current events. Credit for this course is awarded to students who have successfully completed the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program in Salvador, Brazil.

Prerequisite: acceptance into the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program. WCult: NW.

35. Advanced Studies in Brazilian Culture and Society

11X: D.F.S.P.

A course in Brazilian culture and society taught in the context of the Foreign Studies Program. Lectures by local personnel concentrate on contemporary political, social, economic and religious institutions and issues and their historical background. Visits to sites supplement lectures when appropriate. Assigned work includes preparation of short papers, oral presentations and exams, assessed at the advanced level. Students will also write a research paper based on group visits requiring sessions additional to regular classes.

Prerequisites: acceptance into the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program. Dist: SOC; WCult: NW.

36. Studies in Contemporary Brazilian Literature

11X: D.F.S.P.

This course explores trends in Brazilian literature from the 1960s to the present. Genres include novels, plays, short stories and poetry, as well as song lyrics of literary quality from various musical genres. Prominent themes include, but are not limited to, the socio-political experience of the dictatorship, urban and suburban life, and literature by women.

Prerequisite: acceptance into the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW.

60. The Portuguese-Speaking World: Literature and Culture by Period

Not offered in the period from 10F through 11S

Prerequisite: Portuguese 9 or permission of the instructor. Dist: LIT; WCult: W

61. The Portuguese-Speaking World: Genre

Not offered in the period from 10F through 11S

Prerequisite: Portuguese 9 or permission of the instructor. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW

62. Film Media, Performance, and the Arts in the Portuguese-Speaking World

Not offered in the period from 10F through 11S

Prerequisite: Portuguese 9 or permission of the instructor. Dist: LIT; WCult: W

63. Special Topics. Literary and Cultural Productions of the Portuguese-Speaking World

Not offered in the period from 10F through 11S

Prerequisite: Portuguese 9 or permission of the instructor. Dist: LIT; WCult: NW.

80. Seminar

11W, 12W: Arrange

This seminar is designed to provide students specializing in Portuguese studies with a small group setting that facilitates in-depth exploration of key aspects of the discipline. The seminar will encourage students to research and explore relevant topics related to the literature and arts of the Portuguese-speaking world and experiment with the application of the different concepts under discussion in new and creative ways (essay writing, short story writing, visual arts projects, performance pieces, etc.). This course may serve in satisfaction of the culminating experience requirement for Romance Language and modified majors with a concentration in Portuguese. de Lima.

Prerequisite: Portuguese 9 or permission of the instructor. Dist: LIT

In 11W, Identity, Difference, and Otherness in 16th Century Portuguese Travel Narratives. For the Portuguese explorers, the 16th Century was a time of encounters with radical otherness. Their travels confronted them with physical and cultural realities that challenged every cultural assumption, every category of the real. It should not come as a surprise, then, that the first task of the discoverer was to organize a new vision, processing a flood of color, sound and light that threatened to overcome his resistance and impose a new autonomous system of perception and representation. His second task would be to come to grips with that radical otherness. Comparisons and contrasts would provide the first basic tool for “understanding” the Other and his world. They would also set the stage for legitimate appropriation of an ‘Other” that would be found lacing and inferior in the comparative process of apprehension. In mapping out the main processes that shape the colonial dynamics of seeing, knowing and appropriating during that period we will turn to the texts of Pero Vaz de Caminha, Pero de Magalhães Gândavo, Gabriel Soares de Sousa, and Fernão Mendes Pinto.

83. Independent Reading and Research

10F, 11W, 11S, 11F, 12W, 12S: Arrange

A program of individual study directed by a member of the Spanish and Portuguese faculty. Portuguese 83 will normally consist of a program of reading and research that is not covered in regularly scheduled course offerings. After consultation with the faculty advisor of the project, all Independent Study proposals must be submitted for approval to the Department. Under normal circumstances, no student may receive credit for this course more than once.

Students interested in pursuing an Independent Study must identify their topic and faculty advisor, and present a proposal to their faculty advisor and to the Department for approval by the last week of the term prior to registering for Portuguese 83.

90. Honors Course

10F, 11W, 11S, 11F, 12W: Arrange

Supervised independent research under the direction of a designated advisor. Honors stu-dents will normally elect this course as the first in the required sequence (90 and 91) for completion of the Honors Program. Portuguese 90 is intended to prepare the student for writing the Honors thesis, through readings in primary and secondary texts, theory and methodology. The course will include periodic written assignments and culminate in a final paper.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Honors Program.

91. Honors Seminar

11W, 11S, 11F, 12W, 12S: Arrange

A prearranged program of study and research during any term of the senior year, on a tutorial basis, with individual faculty members (normally the thesis advisor). A thesis and public presentation are the expected culmination of the course.

Prerequisite: Prior admission to the Department’s Honors Program; clear evidence of capability to perform honors level work, normally indicated by completion of Portuguese 90 with a grade of B+ or higher.