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German Studies

1. Introductory German

09F: 9S, 10 10W: 9 10S: 9S 10F: 9S, 10  11W, 11S: 9S

Introduction to written and spoken German. Intensive study of basic grammar and vocabulary through readings, drills, composition exercises, conversation, and practice in the lab oratory. Never serves in partial satisfaction of the Distributive or World Culture Requirement. The staff.

2. Introductory German

09F: 10 10W: 9S, 10 10S: 10 10F: 9S,  11W: 9S, 10  11S: 10

Continuation of German 1. Continued intensive work on the fundamentals of oral and written German in classroom and laboratory. Never serves in partial satisfaction of the Distributive or World Culture Requirement. The staff.

3. Intermediate German

09F: 11 10S: 11, D.L.S.A. 10X: D.L.S.A.  10F: 9S  11S, 11X: D.L.S.A.

Continuation of German 2. Designed primarily to develop reading and speaking skills; emphasis on expansion of vocabulary and reinforcement of grammatical structures. Reading and discussion of texts of literary and cultural interest. Oral and written assignments. Never serves in partial satisfaction of the Distributive or World Culture Requirement. The staff.

5. Aspects of Contemporary German Culture

10S, 10X, 11S, 11X: D.L.S.A.

Using the city of Berlin itself as a site and object of study, students will explore contemporary German culture in its widest sense. Visits to religious, architectural, scientific, and industrial sites will acquaint them with multiple aspects of life in Berlin today.

Prerequisite: acceptance into the Dartmouth Language Study Abroad Program. WCult: W.

6. Readings in German Literature

10S, 10X, 11S, 11X: D.L.S.A.

This course introduces students to the interpretation of stories, poems, and articles from various periods of German history. Depending on availability, we will also read plays and view their performances in some of the many theaters in Berlin.

Prerequisite: acceptance into the Dartmouth Language Study Abroad Program. Dist: LIT; WCult: W.

7. First-Year Seminars in German Literature

Consult special listings

8. Advanced Language Skills

10X: 9

Designed to develop facility in oral expression and writing; emphasis on vocabulary expansion and reinforcement of grammatical structures. The course will draw much of its material from the web, as well as from television, films, and more traditional print media. These works will serve as a basis for discussion and frequent writing assignments about contemporary linguistic, cultural, social, and political issues. Not open to returning FSP participants. WCult: W. Schnader.

9. Introduction to German Studies: From the Reformation to Reunification

10S, 10F: 11

This introduction to German cultural history examines social and historical developments as they are reflected in literature, art, music, and philosophy from the age of Martin Luther to the unification of Germany in 1990. Emphasis is placed on Germans’ growing awareness of nationhood and on analysis of aesthetic and intellectual accomplishments representative of major periods in their history. May be elected as a prerequisite for the Foreign Study Program. Conducted in German.

Dist: SOC; WCult: W. Kenkel.

10. German Culture and Society before 1900

10W: 11 11W: 12

Before Germany became a nation state in 1871, language and culture defined its identity. Courses under this rubric will explore various ways in which writers, philosophers, politicians, and artists created and criticized different aspects of this identity. Figures treated will range from Goethe to Freud and from Beethoven to Nietzsche.

In 10W, Enlightenment, Emotion, and Emancipation: German Life and Literature, 1750-1850. An introduction to the lives, times, and main works of major writers of the Golden Age of German literature. Readings include plays, poems, and prose ranging from fairy tales and other short fiction to aesthetic, philosophical, and political treatises. Structured around a series of videos, this course focuses on important periods in German cultural and intellectual history. Essays, oral reports, and a final exam encourage students to hear, read, speak, and write educated German. Conducted in German.

Prerequisite: German 3, or equivalent. Open to all classes. Dist: LIT; WCult: W. Shookman.

In 11W, Enlightenment, Emotion, and Emancipation: German Life and Literature, 1750-1850. An introduction to the lives, times, and main works of major writers of the Golden Age of German literature. Readings include plays, poems, and prose ranging from fairy tales and other short fiction to aesthetic, philosophical, and political treatises. This course focuses on important periods in German cultural and intellectual history. Essays, oral reports, and a takehome final encourage students to hear, read, speak, and write educated German. Conducted in German.

11. German Culture and Society in the Twentieth Century

09F: 11 11S: 9L, 11

In the course of the twentieth century, Germany has undergone changes with global implications. Courses under this rubric will explore important moments in the cultural history of German-speaking countries in the twentieth century, from the Weimar Republic to the Holocaust, and from the Cold War to the fall of the Berlin Wall and beyond.

In 09F and 11S at 11, Autobiography and Memory in 20th Century German Culture. After a brief historical introduction, we will analyze autobiographical and literary texts, artwork, films, and contemporary architectural projects. Readings include works by Heinrich Mann, Anna Seghers, Elias Canetti, Christa Wolf and Walter Benjamin, the Nazi-era diaries of Viktor Klemperer, the paintings of Gerhardt Richter, and films such as Black Box Germany, documenting a society polarized by terrorism. We conclude by analyzing architectural projects memorializing German history. Conducted in German.

Prerequisite: German 3, or equivalent. Open to all classes. Dist: LIT; WCult: W. Fuechtner.

In 11S at 9L, Pre-War, Inter-War, Post-War: German Literature, 1900-1950. An introduction to the lives, times, and works of major German-speaking authors active in the first half of the twentieth century, e.g., Rilke, Kafka, and Trakl; Tucholsky, Brecht, Thomas Mann, Döblin, Remarque, and Fallada; Böll, Borchert, Eich, Schnurre, Kästner, and Andersch. Readings are taken from these authors’ plays, poems, and prose and are complemented by audio-visual as well as vocabulary aids. Students study these literary works against the historical background of the First World, War, the Weimar Republic, Hitler’s seizure of power, the Second World War, and the division of Germany in 1949. They also learn about concepts such as Expressionism and Trümmerliteratur. Essays and a take-home final exam help them improve their linguistic skills while they develop the ability to read literature ranging from early modernism to the Gruppe 47. Dist: LIT WCult: W. Conducted in German. Shookman.

13. Beyond Good and Evil

10S, 11S: 10

Borrowing its title from Nietzsche, this course examines some of the most famous and infamous figures—mythological, fictional and historical—that have profoundly shaped German identity. As we explore the actual lives, works, and influence of the likes of Luther, Faust, and Leni Riefenstahl, you will not only develop a greater understanding of Wagner’s question “What is German?” but also learn how the answer to that question has come to epitomize notions of good and evil in general. Conducted in English.

Open to all classes. WCult: CI. Fuechtner.

29. Advanced Language Training

09F, 10F: D.F.S.P.

Intensive work in spoken and written German. Systematic grammar review and vocabulary building, with special emphasis on idiomatic expression. Weekly written assignments and oral reports on Berlin-related topics. Does not carry major credit.

Prerequisite: acceptance into the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program. WCult: W.

30. Studies in German History

09F, 10F: D.F.S.P.

More than any other German city, Berlin encapsulates Germany’s complex recent past. From the Brandenburg Gate to the Olympic Stadium and from the Wannsee to Alexanderplatz, every corner of the capital evokes memories of Nazi rule, World War II, Cold War divisions, or Unification. This course addresses significant aspects of postwar German history and cultural memory. In-depth studies of important developments will be complemented by visits to museums and historical sites.

Prerequisite: acceptance into the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program. WCult: W.

31. Studies in German Theater

09F, 10F: D.F.S.P.

Berlin is one of the culturally most vibrant cities in Europe. There are over a hundred theaters and several opera houses with performances that range from classical drama to vaudeville and from musicals to serious opera. For the FSP literature course, students will view stage productions and read, discuss, and write weekly essays about the plays. The repertory varies from year to year.

Prerequisite: acceptance into the Dartmouth Foreign Study Program. Dist: LIT; WCult: W.

42. Topics in German Civilization (in English translation)

10X: 10

In 10X, Contemporary German Cinema. Recent German films such as The Lives of Others, The Downfall, Head On or Run Lola Run have enjoyed much international success at festivals and box offices and drawn attention to a new generation of German-language film makers. This class will explore contemporary German culture of the last twenty years through their lens. We will discuss some of the main challenges that German society is facing today: overcoming the divide between East and West, integrating immigrant cultures, and coming to terms with the history of the Third Reich. In our analysis of popular mainstream movies as well as low-budget independent productions, we will also address how film makers today refer to the rich tradition of German cinema before reunification, e.g. the expressionist cinema of the 1920s or the New German Cinema of the 1970s. No German knowledge is required for this class—all films are available and subtitled in English. By special arrangement, this course can also be used to count toward a German Studies major or minor. Open to all classes. Dist: SOC. Fuechtner.

43. History and Theory of German Film (in English translation)

09F: 3A 11S: 2A

In 09F, Continental Strangers: European Exiles and Émigrés in Hollywood, 1933-1950 (Identical to, and described under, Film Studies 42).

German majors can take this course for major credit if they do additional work in German and participate in a German discussion section.

In 11S, The Berlin School (Identical to, and described under, Film Studies 42, pending faculty approval)

Open to all Classes. Dist. ART; WCult: CI. Gemünden.

44. Topics in German Civilization (in English Translation)

11S: 10A

In 11S The Faust Tradition. Faust’s famous story of selling one’s soul to the devil in return for wealth, power, knowledge, love, freedom, or youth has been told in many ways and diverse media. This course concentrates on the life and times of the actual Johann Faustus and their first literary treatment, The Damnable Life and Deserved Death of Dr. John Faust; on two dramatic classics, Christopher Marlowe’s The Tragicall History of the Life and Death of Doctor Faustus and Johann Wolfgang Goethe’s Faust; and on two twentieth-century novels, Mikhail Bulgakov’s The Master and Margarita and Thomas Mann’s Doctor Faustus. Representations of Faust in the visual arts, music, film, and other national literatures will also be regarded. In comparative breadth as well as critical depth, the course thus surveys the enduring fascination with Faust (and his sidekick Mephistopheles) from the Renaissance and the Reformation, through both the Enlightenment and Romanticism, and down to the present day. Shookman.

45. The Burden of the Nazi Past: World War, Genocide, Population Transfer, and Firebombing (in English translation) (Identical to Jewish Studies 37.2 and Comparative Literature 64)

Not offered in the period from 09F through 11S

46. The German Novel (in English translation)

Not offered in the period from 09F through 11S1

47. German Drama (in English translation)

Not offered in the period from 09F through 11S

61. The Age of Goethe: (1749-1832)

10F: 10

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe was the most notable creative force of the period that bears his name, but his contemporaries included an astonishing number of other great geniuses in literature, music, philosophy, etc. In addition to reading representative literary works by Goethe, Hoffmann, Kleist, Lenz, Schiller, and Tieck, students will explore a topic of their choosing about historical, artistic, or scientific developments of the time.

Conducted in German. Open to all classes. Dist: LIT. WCult: W. Duncan.

62. Literature of the Romantic Period

Not offered in the period from 09F through 11S

64. Literature of the Modern Period

Not offered in the period from 09F through 11S

65. Topics in Twentieth Century German Cultural Studies

10W: 10A 11W: 2A

In 10W, Modes of Belonging: What is Heimat? This seminar will introduce students to major issues in German culture that span the course of the twentieth century and consider them through the prism of our theme. It will further familiarize students with the methods of cultural studies, teach them how to explore a topic using different media, and improve their speaking and writing in German. The course is divided into several segments with a week at the end for oral presentations of paper topics. For each topical segment there will be primary readings in German as well as materials in other media. Conducted in German.

German majors can take this course for Senior Seminar credit if they do additional work.

Open to all classes. Dist: LIT; WCult: W. Komska.

In 11W, Major Transformations. This seminar will introduce students to four major issues in German culture during the twentieth century: Grossstadt, Gewalt und Antisemitismus; Stunde Null; Multikulturalismus; and Die Berliner Republik. Through primary readings in German and study of visual and musical material, students will become familiar with the methods of cultural studies, with the use of different media to explore a topic, and will improve their spoken and written German. The course includes oral presentations of paper topics. Conducted in German.

German majors take this course for Senior Seminar credit by doing additional work.

Open to all classes. Dist: LIT; WCult: W. Kacandes.

67. German Drama

Not offered in the period from 09F through 11S

81. Seminar

Not offered in the period from 09F through 11S

82. Seminar in German Media

10S: Arrange

Seminar conducted in German. Thea Dorn

84. Seminar in

Not offered in the period from 09F through 11S

85. Independent Study

All terms: Arrange

87. Honors Thesis

10S, 11S: Arrange

See German Honors Program.

The Department encourages students to consider the following courses in related disciplines:

Art History 43: Northern Renaissance Art

Art History 51: Visions of Modernity: The Nineteenth Century

Art History 53: Classic Modernism: Painting and Sculpture, 1900-1914

Government 41: European Politics

Government 64: Modern Political Thought

History 48: European Society in the Industrial Age

History 51: Modern European Intellectual History, 18th and 19th Centuries

History 52: Modern Germany, 1800-1945

History 65: Europe in the Twentieth Century

Music 32: Western Art Music from the Early Baroque through Beethoven

Music 33: Western Art Music from Early Romanticism to the Late 20th Century

Music 35: Beethoven in Context

Philosophy 15: Modern Philosophy: Hume and Kant

Philosophy 16: Modern Philosophy: Nineteenth Century Continental

Philosophy 17: Phenomenology and Existentialism

GERMANIA

Germania, the German club, is open to all students interested in German language, literature and culture. Members meet for informal discussions and special events.