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Genetics

102. Biochemistry, Cell and Molecular Biology II

10W, 11W: 9

The second term of the required year-long graduate-level core course. Topics include introductory immunology, microbial pathogenesis, principles of genetics, model organisms, genomics, proteomics and bioinformatics.

Prerequisite: Biochemistry 101 or permission of the instructor. Not open to undergraduate students. Three lectures per week. Berwin, Cole, and associates.

118. Advanced Topics in Genetics and Molecular Genetics (Identical to Biochemistry 118)

10S, 11S: Arrange

Each year, Genetics 118 will focus on a different topic. Emphasis is on reading and analyzing material from the primary literature.

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. The staff.

142. Genetics and Physiology of Behavior

10W, 11W: Arrange

Examination of the genetic, physiological, cellular, and molecular bases of behavior and responses to environmental factors in eukaryotic organisms. Topics to be covered from the current and classic literature will include circadian rhythmicity, learning and memory, and other areas of current research; topics emphasized will vary from year to year. Four hours of lecture and discussion per week.

Open to undergraduates (with senior standing and permission of an instructor) who should enroll under Biology 79. The staff.

144. Oncogenomics

10S: Arrange Offered in alternate years.

Cancer is not one disease but hundreds of different diseases caused by hundreds of different genotypes. At the cusp of the era in which it has become possible to classify tumors molecularly and to develop targeted therapeutics, this course will explore the impact of genomics on cancer prevention, detection, classification and treatment. Working with a new textbook and the primary literature, students will present research projects on molecular profiling, model systems, and molecularly targeted drugs and imaging. The course will meet for 3 hours per week.

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Lupien.

145. Human Genetics (Identical to Microbiology and Immunology 145)

11S: Arrange Offered in alternate years.

This course will consider the structure, organization and function of the human genome, with an emphasis on how human genetics will develop now that the genome of humans and many other organisms have been sequenced. The mouse and other model organisms will also be discussed in regard to how they may genetically differ or be similar to humans. The course will meet for two 90 minutes sessions per week. Each session will cover a specific topic and for most sessions the topic will be presented by one of the students enrolled in the course.

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Fiering.

146. Molecular and Computational Genomics

11S: Arrange Offered in alternate years

The sequencing of the complete genomes of many organisms is transforming biology into an information science. This means the modern biologist must possess both molecular and computational skills to adequately mine this data for biological insights. Taught mainly from the primary literature, topics will include genome sequencing and annotation, genome variation, gene mapping, gene expression and functional genomics, proteomics and systems biology. The course will meet for 3 hours per week.

Prerequisite: permission of an instructor. Moore, Whitfield.

147. Animal Development and Human Disease

10S: Arrange Offered in alternate years.

Understanding of the molecular basis of human disease results from the exceptional power of genetic research technologies in the model organisms (worms, flies, fish and mice) and the universal nature of major genetic pathways in the animal kingdom. This course will offer integrated examination of the genetic, cellular, and molecular bases of the biology and pathology of development. The topics will be focused on the most interesting and informative human hereditary diseases for which the responsible genes have been identified. The developmental principles and pathways (e.g., Wnt signaling and colorectal cancer, sex determination and sex reversal, left-right asymmetry and human laterality disorders, DNA repair and Li-Fraumeni syndrome) and the model organisms we will use to illustrate them may vary somewhat from year to year. 1 hour of lecture and 3 hours of discussion per week.

Prerequisite: permission of an instructor. Tevosian, Ahmed, Conradt, Ernst, Saito.

197. Graduate Research in Genetics A

All terms: Arrange

An original individual, experimental, or theoretical investigation beyond the undergraduate level in genetics. This course is open only to graduate students, prior to passing their qualifying exam; it may be elected for credit more than once. This course carries one course credit and should be elected by students conducting research and also electing two or more other graduate or undergraduate courses. Dunlap and the staff of the Program.

198. Graduate Research in Genetics B

All terms: Arrange

An original individual, experimental, or theoretical investigation beyond the undergraduate level in genetics. This course is open only to graduate students, prior to passing their qualifying exam; it may be elected for credit more than once. This course carries two course credits and should be elected by students electing only departmental colloquia in addition to research. Dunlap and the staff of the Program.

199. Graduate Research in Genetics C

All terms: Arrange

An original individual, experimental, or theoretical investigation beyond the undergraduate level in genetics. This course is open only to graduate students, prior to passing their qualifying exam; it may be elected for credit more than once. This course carries three course credits and should be elected by students conducting research exclusively in any one term. Dunlap and the staff of the Program.

267. Graduate Research Colloquium: Developmental Biology

F, W, S: Arrange

All graduate students are required to enroll in Graduate Research Colloquium during each term of residence, except summer. In the Developmental Biology section, students will read and discuss original research papers that apply genetic, molecular, and/or genomic approaches to problems of metazoan development. All students will have frequent opportunities to lead discussions. The class ordinarily meets weekly. Not open to undergraduates. Saito.

271. Graduate Research Colloquium: Chromatin Structure (Identical to Microbiology and Immunology 271)

F, W, S: Arrange

All graduate students are required to enroll in Graduate Research Colloquium during each term of residence, except summer. An essential element of scientific training is in the critical analysis and communication of experimental research in an oral format. Evaluation will be based on quality of the work described, quality of critical analysis, and on presentation style, including effective use of audio-visual materials. All students will be required to participate in at least one Journal Club/Research in Progress series. All students will make oral presentations that describe work from the current literature. This course will meet for a 1-hour discussion once per week. Not open to undergraduates. Ernst, Lupien, Fiering.

297. Graduate Research in Genetics A

All terms: Arrange

An original individual, experimental, or theoretical investigation beyond the undergraduate level in genetics. This course is open only to graduate students, subsequent to passing their qualifying exam; it may be elected for credit more than once. This course carries one course credit and should be elected by students conducting research and also electing two or more other graduate or undergraduate courses. Dunlap and the staff of the Program.

298. Graduate Research in Genetics B

All terms: Arrange

An original individual, experimental, or theoretical investigation beyond the undergraduate level in genetics. This course is open only to graduate students, subsequent to passing their qualifying exam; it may be elected for credit more than once. This course carries two course credits and should be elected by students electing only departmental colloquia in addition to research. Dunlap and the staff of the Program.

299. Graduate Research in Genetics C

All terms: Arrange

An original individual, experimental, or theoretical investigation beyond the undergraduate level in genetics. This course is open only to graduate students, subsequent to passing their qualifying exam; it may be elected for credit more than once. This course carries three course credits and should be elected by students conducting research exclusively in any one term. Dunlap and the staff of the Program.