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Engineering Sciences

Chair: Erland M. Schulson

Professors I. Baker, B. Cushman-Roisin, G. Cybenko, E. Garmire, T. U. Gerngross, U. J. Gibson, R. J. Graves, J. J. Helble, W. Lotko, D. R. Lynch, L. R. Lynd, K. D. Paulsen, B. W. Pogue, E. Santos Jr., E. M. Schulson, S. Taylor; Professors Emeriti A. O. Converse, C. E. Hutchinson, F. E. Kennedy, H. J. Richter, B. U. O. Sonnerup, G. B. Wallis; Associate Professors H. J. Frost, E. W. Hansen, U. L. Osterberg, M. Q. Phan, L. R. Ray, C. R. Sullivan, B. S. Trembly; Assistant Professors M. E. Borsuk, S. G. Diamond, K. E. Griswold, K. Odame, R. Olfati-Saber, P. M. Vlahovska; Senior Lecturers J. P. Collier, J. A. Daubenspeck, R. C. Lasky, C. G. Levey, S. P. McGrath, V. F. Petrenko, P. J. Robbie, J. M. Rosen, S. G. Shepherd; Lecturers M. R. Albert, A. Bakker, V. H. Berk, D. C. Cullen, R. E. Denton, P. Ferguson, P. J. Hoopes, K. Hoyt, M. S. Laser, V. V. May, D. L. Murr, D.W. Van Citters, L. Wissel.

The undergraduate Engineering Sciences major leads to an A.B. degree. It provides engineering students with a common core of Science and Engineering Sciences courses. Interest in the various branches of engineering is accommodated through electives and usually through additional study leading to a Bachelor of Engineering or higher degree. For those students considering careers in such diverse fields as medicine, management, or law, the Engineering Sciences major enables them to understand our increasingly technological society better.

Students interested in a career in Engineering should plan on completing the Bachelor of Engineering or Master’s program. The Bachelor of Engineering degree program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (EAC/ABET); it is equivalent in technical content to the Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering offered at many other universities but is broader in scope. It requires 10 courses in Natural Science, Mathematics, and Engineering beyond the requirements of the major in Engineering Sciences, and typically requires up to three terms in residence beyond the 12 terms required for the A.B. degree. Students who enter Dartmouth with advanced standing may be able to complete the B.E. at the same time as the A.B. in four years.

The graduate degrees are differentiated according to function. For those interested in design, professional practice, and engineering management, the M.E.M. degree is offered; for those interested primarily in research, the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees. Additionally a joint M.D./Ph.D. program is offered in conjunction with the Dartmouth Medical School and a joint M.E.M./M.B.A. program with the Tuck School of Business. The Thayer School Guide to Programs and Courses should be consulted for detailed information on all graduate programs (B.E. and above).

COURSES AVAILABLE TO NON-MAJORS AND FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS

Several engineering sciences courses have few or no prerequisites and may be taken by first-year students exploring a potential interest in the major, or by non-majors seeking to broaden their education with the study of technology. These courses include Engineering Sciences 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 21, 31, 37, and 51.

TECHNOLOGY

Undergraduate courses up to Engineering Sciences 86 satisfy the Technology and Applied Sciences distributive requirements (TAS). Some also satisfy the distributive laboratory requirement (TLA). For those students interested in an introduction to technology and applied sciences one of the courses Engineering Sciences 1 through 13 is recommended.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR

The sequential nature of the Engineering Sciences curriculum, and the possibilities for developing modified majors with other departments require that students plan their study programs well in advance. Assistance in planning programs may be obtained from an engineering faculty advisor.

All first-year students interested in the sciences should take the placement test in mathematics. The prerequisite courses for the Engineering Sciences major are either the Integrated Mathematics and Physics sequence (for the Class of 2009 and earlier) or Mathematics 3, 8, 13, Physics 13, 14, plus Engineering Sciences 20 and Chemistry 5. Computer Science 5 can be substituted for Engineering Sciences 20. For students prepared for advanced placement in Calculus it is advisable to take the sequence, Mathematics 8 and 13, or Mathematics 11.

Unless otherwise prohibited, prerequisites for the major may be taken under the Non-Recording Option. No more than two transfer courses may be used for credit in the major.

The Engineering Sciences Major requires seven courses from the core program:

1. Engineering Sciences 21, 22, and 23 are required.

2. Two from Engineering Sciences 24, 25, 26, and 27.

3. Two from Engineering Sciences 31 or 32; 33 or 34; 35 or 36; or 37.

Two additional courses are required.

4. One elective in Engineering Science.

5. One elective in Engineering Science, mathematics or a science course.

A Culminating Experience in Engineering Sciences is required. This can be taken instead of one of the electives or as an additional course. The culminating experience may be: a project or a thesis, Engineering Sciences 86, 88 or 190 (Engineering Sciences 190 must be taken as part of the two-course design sequence Engineering Sciences 190/290); or (Class of 2009 and earlier) an advanced course (Engineering Sciences 63, 76, 91, 92 or any graduate course available for A.B. credit). Effective with the Class of 2010, the course option consists of an advanced engineering sciences course with a significant design or research project, normally taken in the senior year, chosen from an approved list. Consult the Engineering Sciences Department for the most recent list.

Only Engineering Sciences courses numbered above 20 (excluding 80 and 87) may be counted as electives in the major.

Students seeking to complete the A.B. and B.E. degrees concurrently should note that Engineering Sciences 190 may also be counted toward requirements for the B.E. program.

Satisfactory completion of the major requires a grade point average of 2.0 in the courses suitable for satisfying the major (other than those prerequisite to the major). The same criterion holds for both courses in a modified major and those in a minor.

The courses in the third tier of the core Engineering Sciences (31-37) serve as introductions to different areas of engineering. These courses and other electives are offered to allow students to shape their programs to reflect interests in one of the usual branches of engineering or in accordance with their own special interests. In Mechanical Engineering, the normal third tier core courses and electives are Engineering Sciences 33, 34 and 76; in Electrical Engineering, Engineering Sciences 31, 32, 61 and 62; in Computer Engineering, Engineering Sciences 31, 62, 63 (see also modified major below); in Environmental Engineering, Engineering Sciences 37, 41, 42 and 43 (see also modified major below); in Materials Science, Engineering Sciences 33 and 73; in Chemical Engineering, Engineering Sciences 34, 35, 36 and 37 (see also modified major below); in Biomedical Engineering, Engineering Sciences 35 and 56. Students interested in Chemical Engineering are advised to elect Chemistry 6, 57, and 61 in addition to their engineering courses, and to consult Professor Lynd in formulating their program.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR IN BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING (pending faculty approval)

The biomedical engineering major is offered to students interested in either medical school or graduate studies in biomedical engineering. Faculty from Thayer School and Dartmouth Medical School jointly advise the research projects.

Prerequisites are Mathematics 3, 8, 13, Physics 13, 14, Chemistry 5-6 or 10, plus Engineering Sciences 20 and Biology 11. Computer Science 5 can be substituted for Engineering Sciences 20.

The biomedical engineering major consists of five engineering science courses, Engineering Sciences 21 and 22, one additional core course chosen from Engineering Sciences 23, 24, 25, 26 or 27, one gateway course chosen from Engineering Sciences 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 or 36 and Engineering Sciences 56 or one additional course chosen from Engineering Sciences 23, 24, 25 or 26; four biology and chemistry courses, two from Biology 12, 13, 14 and Chemistry 51-52 or 57-58 and one biochemistry or engineering science elective chosen from Biology 40 or Chemistry 41, or an engineering science course numbered 23 or above.

A culminating experience is required. It may be an independent project or honors thesis, Engineering Sciences 86 or 88, or one of the following courses in biotechnology or biomedical engineering, Engineering Sciences 160, 161, 162 or 165.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR IN ENGINEERING SCIENCES OR A MAJOR MODIFIED WITH ENGINEERING SCIENCES

Prerequisites are Mathematics 3 and 8, and Physics 13 or Physics 3 and 4. The required courses are four Engineering Sciences courses numbered above 20 (excluding 87), to include Engineering Science 21 or 22, or both. Students should note that many Engineering Sciences courses require prerequisites in addition to Mathematics 8 and Physics 13. No course in the modified major or the minor may be taken under the Non-Recording Option.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR IN MATERIALS SCIENCE

The minor in Materials Science is sponsored by faculty in Chemistry, Physics and Engineering with an interest in interdisciplinary education and research in materials science.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ENGINEERING PHYSICS MAJOR

The Department of Engineering Sciences and the Department of Physics and Astronomy offer a major in Engineering Physics. This major features a 5/5 split in courses, unlike a modified major which requires six courses from one field and four from the other.

The prerequisite courses for the Engineering Physics major are Mathematics 3, 8, 13, 23; Physics 13, 14; Chemistry 5; and Computer Science 5 or Engineering Sciences 20;

The Engineering Physics major is a ten-course program consisting of three Engineering Sciences core courses (Engineering Sciences 22, 23, 24); three Physics core courses (Physics 19, 24, 43 [Students taking Physics 15 and 16 may substitute a third elective for Physics 19]); and four electives, two from each department. Two electives must be selected from the following list: Engineering Sciences 25, 33, 34; Physics 42, 68, 91; Physics 73 or Engineering Sciences 131; Physics 66 or Engineering Sciences 120; Physics 44 or Engineering Sciences 140. The other two electives may be courses from the Engineering Sciences Department (numbered above 20, excluding Engineering Sciences 80 and 87) or courses from the Physics and Astronomy Department which fulfill the straight physics major.

A culminating experience is required in the major which can be taken instead of one of the electives above. It must be one of the following: a project or a thesis, Engineering Sciences 86, 88 or 190 (Engineering Sciences 190 must be taken as part of the two-course design sequence Engineering Sciences 190/290); or an advanced course (Engineering Sciences 63, 76, 91, 92 or any graduate course available for A.B. credit. Effective with the Class of 2010, the course option consists of an advanced engineering sciences course with a significant design or research project, normally taken in the senior year, chosen from an approved list. Consult the Engineering Sciences Department for the most recent list) or Physics 68, 72, 73, 74, 76, 82, 87, including the senior honors thesis option.

All major programs require an average GPA of 2.0 in all courses counted toward the major, including prerequisites.

For more information contact Professor Hudson (Physics and Astronomy) or Professors Lotko or Levey (Engineering Sciences).

MODIFIED MAJORS

Diverse interests of students have, in the past, led to the construction of Engineering Sciences majors modified by courses in biology, chemistry, mathematics, computer sciences, physics, art, economics, or environmental studies.

The following specific modified majors have been established.

Modified major with Biology: Students interested in engineering and biology may elect a modified major with biology. This modified major must include:

1. as prerequisites: Mathematics 3, 8, and 13; Physics 13 and 14; Chemistry 5 or 10, Engineering Sciences 20, Biology 11 and 12 (formerly 15) (Note: for the Class of 2009 and earlier, the Integrated Mathematics and Physical Science program may be substituted for the prerequisite Mathematics and Physics courses);

2. for the Engineering Sciences portion: Engineering Sciences 22, 25 and 35 plus three courses elected from Engineering Sciences 21, 23, 24, 26, 33, 34, 36, 37, 52, 56, 91, 161, 165 (Engineering Sciences 91, 161 and 165 also satisfy the culminating experiment requirement, see below);

3. for the biology portion: Biology 13 (formerly 16), plus three courses elected from Biology 34, 35, 37, 42 (formerly 66), 43 (formerly 27), 45 (formerly 23), 46 (formerly 64), 61, 65, or 71 or Chemistry 51 or 57.

4. the modified major must also include a culminating experience, which may be a project or a thesis, Engineering Sciences 86, 88 or 190 (Engineering Sciences 190 must be taken as part of the two-course design sequence Engineering Sciences 190/290); or an advanced course (Engineering Sciences 63, 76, 91, 92 or any graduate course available for A.B. credit). Effective with the Class of 2010, the course option consists of an advanced engineering sciences course with a significant design or research project, normally taken in the senior year, chosen from an approved list. Consult the Engineering Sciences Department for the most recent list.

Students interested in the modified major with Biology should contact Professor Lynd.

Modified major with Chemistry: Students interested in engineering and chemistry may elect a modified major with chemistry. The major enables students to design programs of study that reflect the diversity of their interests. It requires a core of three engineering courses, provides a broad yet relevant set of engineering electives, requires a two-course chemistry core, and is completed with two chemistry electives. This modified major must include:

1. as prerequisites: Mathematics 3, 8, and 13; Physics 13 and 14; Chemistry 5/6 or 10; Engineering Sciences 20. (Note: for the Class of 2009 and earlier, the Integrated Mathematics and Physical Sciences program may be substituted for the prerequisite Mathematics and Physics courses);

2. for the Engineering Sciences portion: Engineering Sciences 22, 25 and 36 plus three courses elected from the following: Engineering Sciences 21, 23, 24, 26, 33, 34, 35, 37, 52, 91, 156, 158 (Engineering Sciences 91, 156 and 158 also satisfy the culminating experience requirement, see below.) Not more than two from 21, 35 and 37 may be counted toward the major.

3. for the Chemistry portion: Chemistry 51 or 57 and 61 or 71 plus two courses elected from Chemistry 41, 52 or 58, 63, 64, 67, 72, 73

4. the modified major must also include a culminating experience, which may be a project or a thesis, Engineering Sciences 86, 88 or 190 (Engineering Sciences 190 must be taken as part of the two-course design sequence Engineering Sciences 190/290); or an advanced course (Engineering Sciences 63, 76, 91, 92 or any graduate course available for A.B. credit). Effective with the Class of 2010, the course option consists of an advanced engineering sciences course with a significant design or research project, normally taken in the senior year, chosen from an approved list. Consult the Engineering Sciences Department for the most recent list.

Students interested in the modified major with Chemistry should contact Professor Lynd.

Modified Major with Computer Science: For those students interested in computer engineering, a major in engineering sciences modified with computer science is recommended. Such a modified major must include:

1. as prerequisites: Mathematics 3, 8, and 13; Computer Science 5; Computer Science 8, 15 or 18 (Computer Science 15 and 18 are no longer offered, can be used as prerequisites by students who took them previously); Physics 13 and 14; and Chemistry 5 (Note: for the Class of 2009 and earlier, the Integrated Mathematics and Physical Science program may be substituted for the prerequisite Mathematics and Physics courses).

2. for the modified major required courses include: Engineering Sciences 22, 27 31, Computer Science 23, plus Engineering Sciences 23 or 24.

3. for the modified major, breadth options include: a total of five courses from Groups A, B, and C with at least one course from each of the groups and three of the courses must be Computer Science courses; Group A includes Engineering Sciences 32, 62, 63, Computer Science 37; Group B includes Engineering Sciences 26, 68, 92 (Engineering Sciences 63 and 92 also satisfy the culminating experience requirement, see below), Computer Science 78; Group C includes Engineering Sciences 91, Computer Science 25, 52, 58.

4. the modified major must also include a culminating experience, which may be a project or a thesis, Engineering Sciences 86, 88 or 190 (Engineering Sciences 190 must be taken as part of the two-course design sequence Engineering Sciences 190/290); or an advanced course (Engineering Sciences 63, 76, 91, 92 or any graduate course available for A.B. credit). Effective with the Class of 2010, the course option consists of an advanced engineering sciences course with a significant design or research project, normally taken in the senior year, chosen from an approved list. Consult the Engineering Sciences Department for the most recent list.

Students interested in the modified major with Computer Science should contact Professor Cybenko.

Modified Major with Environmental Sciences: A modified major has been established to permit interdisciplinary study in environmental sciences. Effective preparation for graduate study or professional activity in the environmental sciences requires an assimilation of material traditionally encountered in biology, chemistry, ecology, and earth sciences, as well as in engineering sciences. This modified major must include:

1. as prerequisites: Mathematics 3, 8, and 13; Physics 13 and 14; Chemistry 5 or 10; Biological Sciences 11 and 16 (formerly 14); and Engineering Sciences 20 (Note: for the Class of 2009 and earlier, the Integrated Mathematics and Physical Science program may be substituted for the prerequisite Mathematics and Physics courses);

2. for the Engineering Sciences portion: Engineering Sciences 22, 25, 37, 41, 43 and one of the following: Engineering Sciences 27, 34, 36, 52 or 171.

3. for the Environmental Sciences portion: four courses from the following list, with at least two courses from one department. Biological Sciences 21 (formerly 54), 23 (formerly 53), 25, 26 (formerly 51); Chemistry 51, 63; Earth Sciences 26, 55, 66, 76; Environmental Studies 20, 25, 55, 79, 89. Additional requirements: Chemistry 51 is permitted only as a prerequisite to Chemistry 63.

4. the modified major must also include a culminating experience, which may be a project or a thesis, Engineering Sciences 86, 88 or 190 (Engineering Sciences 190 must be taken as part of the two-course design sequence Engineering Sciences 190/290); or an advanced course (Engineering Sciences 63, 76, 91, 92 or any graduate course available for A.B. credit). Effective with the Class of 2010, the course option consists of an advanced engineering sciences course with a significant design or research project, normally taken in the senior year, chosen from an approved list. Consult the Engineering Sciences Department for the most recent list.

Students interested in the modified major with Environmental Sciences should contact Professor Lynch.

Modified major with Economics: Students interested in business and industrial management may elect a modified major with economics, consisting of:

1. as prerequisites: Mathematics 3, 8, and 13; Physics 13 and 14; Chemistry 5; Engineering Sciences 20 or Computer Science 5; Economics 1 and 10 (Note: for the Class of 2009 and earlier, the Integrated Mathematics and Physical Science program may be substituted for the prerequisite Mathematics and Physics courses);

2. for the Engineering Sciences portion: Engineering Sciences 21, 22, 52 and one course selected from Engineering Sciences 23, 24, 25, or 33; and two Engineering Science electives;

3. for the Economics portion: two courses among Economics 20, 21, 22, and a two-course sequence in Money and Finance (Economics 26 and 36), Industrial Organization (Economics 25 and 45), or (Economics 25 and 35), or International Trade (Economics 29 and 39).

4. the modified major must also include a culminating experience, which may be a project or a thesis, Engineering Sciences 86, 88 or 190 (Engineering Sciences 190 must be taken as part of the two-course design sequence Engineering Sciences 190/290); or an advanced course (Engineering Sciences 63, 76, 91, 92 or any graduate course available for A.B. credit). Effective with the Class of 2010, the course option consists of an advanced engineering sciences course with a significant design or research project, normally taken in the senior year, chosen from an approved list. Consult the Engineering Sciences Department for the most recent list.

Students interested in the modified major with Economics should contact Professor Schulson.

Modified major with Public Policy: Students interested in technology and public policy may want to consider an engineering major modified with public policy. This modified major must include:

1. as prerequisites: Mathematics 3, 8 and 13; Physics 13 and 14; Engineering Sciences 20 or Computer Science 5; Chemistry 5; a course in statistical data analysis, such as Economics 10, Social Science 10, or Mathematics 10.

2. for the Engineering Sciences portion: Engineering Sciences 21 and 22, plus one course selected from Engineering Sciences 23-27, one course selected from Engineering Sciences 31-37, one course selected from Engineering Sciences 41, 43, 44, 51, 52, 56 and one Engineering Sciences course numbered above 20.

3. for the Public Policy portion: Public Policy 5, plus at least one Public Policy methods course, such as: Public Policy 40-48 or Economics 20, and at least one course from a policy track. These are typically mid-level courses in Public Policy or related departments, and cannot include Engineering Sciences courses. Possible tracks include: Environment and Public Policy; Health and Public Policy; Natural resources and Public Policy; and Science/technology and Public Policy. The Rockefeller Center maintains a list of suggested offerings in these areas.

4. the modified major must also include a culminating experience, which may be a project or a thesis, Engineering Sciences 86, 88 or 190 (Engineering Sciences 190 must be taken as part of the two-course design sequence Engineering Sciences 190/290); or an advanced course (Engineering Sciences 63, 76, 91, 92 or any graduate course available for A.B. credit). Effective with the Class of 2010, the course option consists of an advanced engineering sciences course with a significant design or research project, normally taken in the senior year, chosen from an approved list. Consult the Engineering Sciences Department for the most recent list.

Students interested in the modified major with Public Policy should contact Professor Helble.

Modified major with Studio Art: Students interested in architecture or product design may want to consider an engineering major modified with studio art. This modified major must include:

1. as prerequisites: Mathematics 3, 8, and 13; Physics 13 and 14; plus Engineering Sciences 20 and Chemistry 5. (Note: for the Class of 2009 and earlier, the Integrated Mathematics and Physical Science program may be substituted for the prerequisite Mathematics and Physics courses);

2. for the engineering science portion: Engineering Sciences 21, 24 and 33, plus two courses elected from Engineering Sciences 22, 25, 31, 37, 75, 76 and one engineering science elective (Engineering Sciences 76 or a graduate level elective also satisfy the culminating experience requirement, see below);

3. for the studio art portion: Studio Art 15 and 16, plus two upper level studio art courses.

4. the modified major must also include a culminating experience, which may be a project or a thesis, Engineering Sciences 86, 88 or 190 (Engineering Sciences 190 must be taken as part of the two-course design sequence Engineering Sciences 190/290); or an advanced course (Engineering Sciences 63, 76, 91, 92 or any graduate course available for A.B. credit). Effective with the Class of 2010, the course option consists of an advanced engineering sciences course with a significant design or research project, normally taken in the senior year, chosen from an approved list. Consult the Engineering Sciences Department for the most recent list.

Students interested in the modified major with Studio Art should contact Professor Robbie.

Normally, other modified major programs will contain at least three of the following Engineering Sciences core courses: 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36 or 37 (plus two Engineering Sciences electives.) The modified major must also include a culminating experience; this can be taken instead of one of the electives or as an additional course. The culminating experience may be: a project or a thesis, Engineering Sciences 86, 88 or 190 (Engineering Sciences 190 must be taken as part of the two-course design sequence Engineering Sciences 190/ 290); or an advanced course (Engineering Sciences 63, 76, 91, 92 or any graduate course available for A.B. credit). Effective with the Class of 2010, the course option consists of an advanced engineering sciences course with a significant design or research project, normally taken in the senior year, chosen from an approved list. Consult the Engineering Sciences Department for the most recent list. A coherent program of study with a substantial engineering content but not including all or any of the above courses may be approved (by the Department Chair) as a modified major based in another department, or as a special major.

All modified Engineering Sciences majors must be approved by the Chair of the Engineering Sciences Department.

HONORS PROGRAM

During their junior or senior year, students may apply for admission to the Honors Program in Engineering Sciences. The application must be filed no earlier than the second week of the fall term in the junior year and no later than the second week of the winter term in the senior year. Contact the Chair of the Engineering Sciences Department for details. Admission to the Honors Program may be granted to those students who have attained an overall grade point average of 3.0, and a grade point average of 3.33 in the major.

The main requirement of the Honors Program is the completion of an honors project. The project, a creative activity suitable to the major subject, is not restricted to experimental work but can equally take the form of a theoretical investigation. Much of the development of the honors project will normally take place within the framework of Engineering Sciences 88, the Honors Thesis. (Engineering Sciences 88 also fulfills the requirement for a culminating experience in the major.) Upon completion of the project, the student will submit a written thesis and give an oral presentation. Those students who satisfactorily complete the Honors Program with a ‘B+’ average or better and have a grade point average of 3.3 or higher in the major at the time of graduation, will earn Honors recognition in the major. High Honors will be granted to those students who, in addition, have taken two engineering science courses beyond those required for the major (excluding courses under 20), have attained a grade point average of 3.50 in all engineering courses, and have completed outstanding independent work. A vote of the Department is also required prior to awarding High Honors. Students may begin their project the previous term by enrolling in Engineering Science 87, Undergraduate Investigations. An interim evaluation of honors students will be made after one term and continuation will be recommended for those students whose work demonstrates the capacity for satisfactory (B+) work. Students who satisfactorily complete the Honors Program will have entered on their permanent record Honors in Engineering Sciences, or High Honors in Engineering Sciences.

ADVANCED STANDING IN THAYER SCHOOL GRADUATE PROGRAMS

Many students majoring in engineering sciences enter Dartmouth College with course credits, proficiencies, or both, in a number of subjects resulting from exceptional preparation in high school. As a result, these students have increased elective freedom in choosing courses to satisfy their A.B. requirements.

The 100- and 200-level Engineering and Engineering Sciences courses described in this bulletin can be used to satisfy the A.B. degree requirements.

Election of 100- and 200-level Engineering and Engineering Sciences courses in excess of the undergraduate requirements for the major and for admission to any of Thayer’s post-A.B. programs will permit a student to be admitted to the Thayer School with advanced standing. Depending upon the number of elective opportunities, significant reduction in the time required to complete Thayer School’s graduate degree programs is possible.

To take full advantage of this opportunity students are urged, as early as possible after declaring their major, to consult with their Thayer School faculty adviser. Additional details are contained in the Thayer School Bulletin

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER’S DEGREE (M.S.)

The Faculty of the Thayer School believes that the education of all graduate students should include reasonable breadth in the areas of applied mathematics and engineering.

In addition to the basic requirements for the Master’s degree, which include three terms in residence at Dartmouth, the Department requires:

For the M.S. with concentration in Engineering Sciences:

1. The requirement is nine approved graduate-level courses, five of which must be engineering courses. For students whose prior preparation is an accredited B.S. or B.E. in Engineering, or equivalent, the requirement is six graduate-level courses.

2. Satisfaction of the following distribution requirements:

a. One Applied Mathematics Course (see below)

b. Minimum of two courses in engineering breadth

c. Minimum of three courses in engineering depth.

(Courses taken previously, e.g., as an undergraduate, can be used in satisfaction of this requirement but do not reduce the number of courses required, unless admission is with advanced standing.)

3. A thesis approved by the student’s graduate committee and the faculty, demonstrating the ability to do research and contribute to the field.

4. An oral defense of the thesis.

Applied Mathematics Courses:

ENGS 91, ENGS 92, ENGS 100, ENGS 103, ENGS 104, ENGS 105, ENGS 106, ENGS 200, ENGS 202, and ENGS 205.

A faculty advisor will be appointed for each candidate to aid in developing his or her program. The individual course of study must be submitted to, and be approved by, the Thayer School Graduate Committee, during the student’s first term of residency. The thesis must be approved by a thesis committee. The thesis committee generally consists of three faculty members from the student’s department/program of study (including the thesis advisor). One of the three may be from outside the department/program, but this is not a requirement. Copyright to theses will be held by the Trustees of Dartmouth College.

For students recommended for the award of the M.S. degree, the faculty may also recommend the award of the B.E. degree if a substantial portion of the student’s undergraduate program was taken at Dartmouth or in one of its official exchange programs and, if in meeting M.S. requirements, the ABET criteria for the award of the B.E. are also satisfied. Students wishing to take advantage of this opportunity should plan their M.S. programs appropriately. At least one term prior to the scheduled M.S. thesis defense, the B.E./M.S. candidate submits a Bachelor of Engineering program plan approved by both their advisor and the Director of the Bachelor of Engineering program to the Registrar.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DOCTOR’S DEGREE (PH.D.)

Students with a master’s degree (or outstanding performance on a bachelor’s degree) in engineering or the physical sciences are eligible for admission to the Doctor of Philosophy program. Consult the 2008-2009 Thayer School Guide to Programs and Courses for details. The requirements for the Ph.D. are as follows:

1. Residence at Thayer School for a minimum of eight terms after the bachelor’s degree, at least three of which occur after successful completion of the Oral Examination. Residence requires

a. six terms of participation in the weekly Thayer Seminar on Applied Science and Technology, including one-time completion of the special graduate Seminar on Science, Technology and Society, ENGS 195, and

b. annual participation in the Research-in-Progress Workshop, for which each Candidate in residence presents his or her individual research progress.

2. Technical proficiency in principles and methods of engineering, applied science, and applied mathematics underlying the anticipated thesis research, as evidenced by performance on an oral qualifying examination. The examination covers at least three fundamental areas selected by the Candidate in consultation with his or her special advisory committee and approved by the Director.*

3. Technical breadth in engineering or applied science, as demonstrated by either an approved course of study in one or more areas outside or secondary to the Candidate’s main area of specialization, defense of a research proposal or completion of a project in an area outside the Candidate’s main area of specialization.*

4. Specialization with mastery at an advanced level of the body of knowledge pertaining to the Candidate’s chosen area of research, as demonstrated by the successful oral defense of a thesis proposal, and by completion of a program of study approved by the Graduate Program Committee. The extent and content of this program are designed to meet the individual interests and needs of the Candidate.*

5. Professional competence in resource development for a research project or technology startup enterprise, as demonstrated by completion of a competitive research proposal or business plan for a technology startup company. The proposal or business plan may be developed either independently or as part of the Competitive Proposal Workshop.

6. Original research making a significant contribution to knowledge, combined with demonstration of professional expertise in the chosen area of study, as demonstrated by at least the following:

a. presentation of elements of the doctoral research at a professional meeting with the Candidate as first author,

b. a dissertation of professional quality certified by the Candidate’s thesis committee,

c. acceptance of at least one manuscript on the doctoral research for publication with the Candidate as first author, and

d. public oral presentation and defense of the dissertation.

PH.D. PROGRAM IN INNOVATION

Thayer School offers a Ph.D. Program in Innovation, which supplements the student’s engineering research with specific coursework and practice in applying entrepreneurial skills to move research discoveries to market. Students in the Program in Innovation meet all requirements for admission to candidacy and full admission to the Ph.D. program, including passing an oral qualifying examination and defending a Ph.D. thesis proposal. Specific requirements for the candidates in the Program in Innovation can be found in the Thayer School Guide to Programs and Courses.

M.D.-PH.D. PROGRAM IN BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING

Thayer School of Engineering and the Dartmouth Medical School offer an M.D./Ph.D. program in biomedical engineering. Students must apply to the Medical School, indicating their interest in the joint program. The requirements for the Ph.D. portion of the program are modified to permit a more efficient completion of the dual degree program.

A student may begin by first pursuing two years of study in basic science at the Medical School. Enrollment in Thayer School for two years follows, during which the student would take courses, qualify for Ph.D. candidacy, pass the oral examination, and initiate dissertation research. Alternately, some students prefer to satisfy basic Ph.D. requirements before starting medical school. The research would then be continued in concert with years 3 and 4 of the M.D. program (the clinical years), especially during year 4 where dissertation research would be counted as elective courses toward the M.D. Both degrees are awarded simultaneously after typically 6 to 6 1/2 years of study.

Specific requirements of this program are:

M.D. component: Completion of the 4-year M.D. curriculum. Elective time of year 4 can be devoted to Ph.D. dissertation research. (Consult the Dartmouth Medical School Bulletin for details.)

Ph.D. component:

1. Residence at Thayer School for a minimum of five terms after the Bachelor’s degree, at least one of which occur after successful completion of the Oral Examination. Residence requires three terms of participation in the weekly Thayer Seminar on Applied Science and Technology.

2. Technical proficiency in principles and methods of engineering, applied science, and applied mathematics underlying the anticipated thesis research, as evidenced by performance on an oral qualifying examination. The examination covers at least three fundamental areas selected by the Candidate in consultation with his or her special advisory committee and approved by the graduate program committee.

3. Technical breadth in engineering or applied science, as demonstrated by either an approved course of study in one or more areas outside or secondary to the Candidate’s main area of specialization or defense of a research proposal or completion of a project in an area outside the Candidate’s main area of specialization.*

4. Specialization with mastery at an advanced level of the body of knowledge pertaining to the Candidate’s chosen area of research, as demonstrated by the successful oral defense of a thesis proposal, and by completion of a program of study approved by the M.D./Ph.D. Biomedical Engineering Committee. The extent and content of this program are designed to meet the individual interests and needs of the Candidate.

5. Original research making a significant contribution to knowledge, combined with demonstration of professional expertise in the chosen area of study, as demonstrated by at least the following:

a. presentation of elements of the doctoral research at a professional meeting with the Candidate as first author,

b. a dissertation of professional quality certified by the Candidate’s thesis committee. The Thesis Committee consists of a minimum of three full-time faculty members from the student’s department/program of study (including the thesis advisor) and one with an appointment outside the department/program, preferably outside of Dartmouth.

c. acceptance of at least one manuscript on the doctoral research for publication with the Candidate as first author, and

d. public oral presentation and defense of the dissertation.

PH.D. IN COMPUTER SCIENCE

A Ph.D. in computer science is offered by the graduate program in Computer Science, including some Thayer School faculty. See section entitled Computer Science for details.

* The oral examination, procedures for demonstrating technical breadth, and thesis proposal are described in more detail in the Thayer School Guide to Programs and Courses.

* The oral examination, procedures for demonstrating technical breadth, thesis proposal, and work­shop to facilitate development of a competitive research proposal or business plan are described in more detail in the Thayer School Guide to Programs and Courses.