Linguistics and Cognitive Sciences

Cindy Guo ‘10 LING-CindyGuo
F09-S10 D-plan: R-R-R
Linguistics, Economics

Favorite and least favorite things about your department:

My favorite thing about the department is that the professors are very approachable. They have office hours but are usually free to meet with you at other times. You can go in and talk to them about Linguistics, their areas of expertise, choosing classes, or anything else. One difficult thing is that the Linguistics department is kind of small, so it can be hard to fit in classes with your d-plan, especially if you plan to study abroad or otherwise be off for a few non-summer terms. The professors realize this, though, and you can adjust some classes for the major if they don’t fit in with your schedule.

Important info for potential majors:

It’s definitely important to plan ahead so that you can fit in the classes you want to take. Also, you can go in and talk to the head of the department about picking classes and finishing the major requirements. If it’s absolutely not possible to take a required class, you might even be able to substitute something else for it. The department’s willing to listen to and work with you.

Talk to me if:

You’re thinking about modifying a Ling major or double majoring. I also went on the Linguistics FSP, so I can answer questions about that too.

Most valuable academic info learned:

Make sure to take some random classes in subjects you’ve always been interested in. It’s great to learn something different, and you might even find something you’re really passionate about. For a while, every class I took made me want to major in that department. While you do eventually have to settle on a major (or two), you can still experiment through distribs or any extra electives you have.

Favorite class and professor:

I enjoyed Ling 50/Ames 17, Discourse, Culture and Identity in Asia and the Middle East with Professor Glinert. The focus was sociolinguistics and we studied the effects language has on culture and vice versa. This class was also relevant to Chinese, which is the modified aspect of my major. A lot of guest speakers came in and we were able to study language through the lens of anthropology, music, and other areas.

Major classes taken:

LING 1, 8, 20, 22, 50; ANTH 51; CHIN 11, 31, 32, 42

Major journey:

I had always enjoyed learning languages in high school so I signed up for the Linguistics freshman seminar. I discovered that Linguistics and studying foreign languages were actually quite different, but I found the topics we discussed in class interesting. Sociolinguistics and the cultural aspect of communication are the areas that appeal most to me. Also, the more technical classes, such as phonetics and syntax, end up being quite useful outside of Linguistics.

Major-specific activities:

Presidential Scholar research with Professor Sacerdote for Economics

Other activities:

Aegis; Alpha Xi Delta-Philanthropy Chair; DAOpals; Dartmouth Chinese Culture Society-President; Green Key Society; Tour Guide; Undergraduate Advisor

Off-campus program:

AMELL FSP in Beijing, 07X
Linguistics FSP in Auckland, 09W

Internship experience:

Davis, Polk & Wardwell, Document Clerk, 09S, New York, NY

sliderLauren A. Glover ‘11 LING-LaurenGlover
F09-S10 D-plan: R-L-R
Linguistics Modified with Neuroscience and a minor in Engineering

Favorite and least favorite things about your department:

I most enjoy the enlighteningly rich conversations that you will inevitably have with any given Linguistics professor. They are incredibly passionate about their subjects; and when given a question, will not only answer it with surprising depth, but also answer some questions which you hadn’t even thought of yet. However, most Linguistics professors seem to convey their point more easily in a small-classroom setting as it provides better discussion. It’s easy to feel awkward discussing meticulous ideas in a large lecture setting (such as Linguistics 001)

Important info for potential majors:

Whether conducting analyses at a phonological (small-scale) or conversational (large-scale), it’s important to talk aloud. It feels silly at first to sound out words or argue over whether something was voiced or voiceless in class, but it is the most beneficial tool to gaining a concrete understanding of language.

Talk to me if:

You’re interested in the scientific applications of the Linguistics major. I’m focusing on the applications of a neurologically engineered mental lexicon (i.e., resulting in mute people with the ability to speak).

Most valuable academic info learned:

There is no such thing as a proper grammar for everyone. Each mental lexicon is specific to its own individual (i.e., if it sounds right to you, then it’s correct).

Favorite class and professor:

As of right now, my favorite professor is Prof. David Peterson, teaching LING 024: Discourse Analysis. After collecting a conversation sample, you transcribe and analyze it on the grounds of pause time, non-verbal communication, politeness, and etcetera.

Major classes taken:

LING 1, 11, 24; PSYC 6; EDUC 50; ENGS 005; FREN 002, 003, 007

Major journey:

I was originally a Neuroscience major with a greater interest in language use and its applications in studying the brain, but no outlet. Linguistics satisfied the human aspect of what intrigued me. On a whim, I took an engineering class, only to discover that there was current research on engineering a larynx (i.e., voice box). This led me to believe that we can engineer humans to speak, but knowledge of the mental lexicon is needed.

Other activities:

Women in Science Project, Dartmouth Dance Ensemble, Dartmouth Classical Ballet Theatre, and SoulScribes-VP

Off-campus program:

FSP in Auckland, 10W

Internship experience:

Dr. Chetankumar Tailor: Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
: 2010 Winter: Served as a head of the lab group specifically determining the envelope sequence of the Feline Leukemia Viruses A, B, C, and T and their consequences in causing Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA) in infants.

sliderL. Michael Lefkowitz ‘10 LING-Michael
F09-S10 D-plan: R-L-R
Linguistics

Favorite and least favorite things about your department:

I love how interdisciplinary linguistics is.  Few other fields touch on logic, physics, sociology, anthropology, history, and computer science.  Also, the linguistics professors at Dartmouth are great teachers and fun people to boot.

My least favorite thing is the infrequency of many interesting classes due to the small size of the department.  Core classes aside, many topics are taught only every other year, so you have to be careful when planning out your D-Plan.  The upside of having a small department is that you can have a close relationship with all the professors.

Important info for potential majors:

The ling major is a pretty straight shot.  Once you’ve taken Ling 1, you can take almost any class in the department.  As said previously though; if there are any specific classes you want to take, start planning your D-plan around them early.

Talk to me if:

You have general questions about what linguistics is, or if you’re having trouble with Ling 1 or Syntax.  Or if you need a forth.

Most valuable academic info learned:

Go to office hours, even if you’re doing well in a class.  Introduce yourself to the professor on the first day.  Ask questions.

NPs are a lie.  (But don’t tell anyone I said that).

If you’re taking Indo-European Linguistics, from day one keep a running list of ALL sound changes and ALL cognates in the back of your notebook!

Favorite class and professor:

Favorite class: Ling 36, Field Methods, w. David Peterson
Favorite professor: Timothy Pulju

Major classes taken:

LING 1, 17, 18, 22, 24, 26, 35, 80

Major journey:

I took Ling 1 with my freshman fall, purely out of interest, and was hooked.  I liked the diversity of topics in linguistics, and dealing with linguistics data was a lot of fun, so I took it and ran with it.

Major-specific activities:

TA for Ling 1; RA for Professor Peterson; Tutor/Section Leader with the ASC.

Thesis status:

Not sure yet.

Other activities:

Co-ed Council—VP; Phi Tau—Social Chair, House Manager;

Off-campus program:

Japanese LSA+ in Tokyo, 07X, and Linguistics FSP in Auckland, NZ, 10W

sliderNatalie Stoll ‘10 LING-NatalieStoll
F09-S10 D-plan: R-R-R
Linguistics Major, Economics Minor
Pre-Law

Favorite and least favorite things about your department:

The Linguistics department is really small, which helps foster relationships with fellow Linguistics majors and with your professors. The professors are really knowledgeable and are always available to help you outside of class. Scheduling classes can be somewhat difficult because some classes are only offered every two years. With off terms and study abroad programs, you might never get to take a certain class. On the bright side, registering for classes is really easy because there might be only four Linguistics classes being offered, and you may have already taken one or two of them. In the end careful planning can solve this problem.

Important info for potential majors:

Potential majors should take Ling. 1 as soon as possible. The class gives you a very good overview of the field of Linguistics. It highlights the different sub-fields of Linguistics that are available to take as classes after Ling. 1. If Ling. 1 sparks your interest I would highly recommend taking any other Linguistics class the next term to see if Linguistics is right for you.

Talk to me if:

You came to Dartmouth not knowing what you were going to major in and still have no idea! …You need help deciding which Linguistics class to take after Ling. 1.

Most valuable academic info learned:

Your major should be something that you get excited about. You should look forward to taking the classes and enjoy them. Do not be concerned about what you might do with your major once you have graduated. You can do anything with any major. Take the classes that interest you, and you will get the most out of them.

Favorite class and professor:

Historical Linguistics with Professor Pulju was an awesome class. Professor Pulju is incredibly smart and explains concepts very clearly. We started off talking about sound change and kept building from there, adding new concepts that we would analyze in our data sets. The data sets really helped me understand the material, and as the term progressed they became more complicated, and also more fun!

Major classes taken:

LING 1, 10, 17, 18, 20, 26, 27, 80

Major journey:

I had no idea what I wanted to major in and my friend suggested I take a Linguistics class. I took Ling. 1 my sophomore fall and found it really interesting. I decided to take Sociolinguistics in the winter and really enjoyed that as well. I declared Linguistics as my major in the winter, but did not decide completely until my sophomore summer, after I took two more Linguistics classes.

Other activities:

Dartmouth Track and Field – Captain; Alpha Xi Delta – Treasurer; Big Brother Big Sister – mentor; DOC Trips – trip leader

Off-campus program:

Volunteer English Teacher in Arusha, Tanzania, 08F

Internship experience:

Federal Public Defender Office, Clerical Assistant/Intern, 06X and 07X, Portland, OR

sliderAllie Miller ‘10 LING-and-cog-AllieMiller
F09-S10 D-plan: R-R-R
Cognitive Science, Women’s and Gender Studies Minor

Favorite and least favorite things about your department:

I primarily love the flexibility of the major. You can be on-term or go off-term wherever you like and always have major classes available. I didn’t have to change around my D-Plan in order to be able to take classes in succession. Additionally, because the major is so small (Cog Sci Class of 2010 has seven majors), the professors will hold get-togethers or happy hours for everyone. That all being said, because the major consists of four departments rather than just one, there can sometimes be a lack of communication or advising between all four departments. My major advisor, a Ling/Russian professor, is amazing, but knows very little about the Computer Science department.

Important info for potential majors:

Just read up on the major! I had never even heard of it and only chose it after some reading and research about it. And if you decide to become a major, find your major advisor quickly. They will be indispensable when considering independent studies and theses.

Talk to me if:

you have any questions!! Or are trying to shy away from more biology-focused classes.

Most valuable academic info learned:

Time management and taking the time to bond with professors. They’re here for YOU!

Favorite class and professor:

A tie between Linguistics 20, Experimental Phonetics with Professor Chitoran and Psych 28/COGS 2, Cognition with Kelley. In the phonetics class, I absolutely loved our last assignment—you got to study anything you wanted about a language not taught at Dartmouth. I did an in-depth analysis of end consonants in Thai!

Major classes taken:

LING 1, 20; PSYCH 1, 11, 25, 28; PHIL 1, 6, 26. (plus one off-term class). Will be taking CS 5, PSYCH 60, and COGS 85.

Major journey:

Oh god. Started as a math major. Became a Psychology major for a day. Then a Psych/Ling double major. Then a Psych/Phil double major with a Ling minor. And now: Cognitive Science.

Other activities:

Dartmouth Dodecaphonics – Business Manager, Tour Manager; DREAM – Fundraising Chair; Kappa Delta Epsilon – Programming Chair; Campus Senior Tour Guides – mentor; Dimensions – performer ’07, coordinator ’08; HCROO ’08; Dartmouth Hillel – Community Service Chair; The Dartmouth Independent; Shebalite 08X

Off-campus program:

Transfer Term at Royal Hollloway, University of London, 09W

Internship experience:

Weber Shandwick, Public Relations intern, 07X, Los Angeles
NBC/Universal, TV Production intern, 08W, Los Angeles

sliderEmily Ulrich ‘11
F09-S10 D-plan: FSP-R-R
History and Liguistics

Favorite and least favorite things about your department:

The Professors in the History department are passionate about their subject and are willing to engage with students one on one outside of class.  There are great research opportunities, and an FSP to London.  As well as learning about History, the department teaches students the process behind academic research. By offering an inside view of this dialogue, students themselves are invited into the debate.  Instead of just memorizing facts, students are invited to participate in questioning the past.  All history students are required to take courses in different geographic areas. If one has a tight schedule it can be challenging to work everything in, however with considered planning this should not be too frustrating an obstacle to overcome.

Important info for potential majors:

Start by taking a course that interests you without worrying about whether or not you are going to major in the department and how/if that will effect your career etc. Choosing a major should be the natural result of following your interests, not a forced attempt at creating a “future”.

Talk to me if:

You are interested multiple subject areas so we can find a way to connect them and get a satisfying major out of your interests.

Most valuable academic info learned:

Go to office hours, ask questions, and get to know your professors and the research they are doing.  It gives you insight beyond your classes into your field of study.

Favorite class and professor:

Hard question: History 43 with Prof. Simons was incredible because it surveyed the whole arc of the middle ages and introduced me for the first time in a serious way to the subject.  The course peaked my curiosity and I’m now majoring in this time period.  I’d recommend it to anyone who wants to try out the History department. For seminar classes: Hist. 49 with Prof. Estabrook and Eng. 20 with Prof. Warren.

Major classes taken:

Just to clarify, Medieval Studies includes courses outside of the History department.  Therefore I’ve taken:  Hist 43, 49; Eng. 20; Comp 10; Rel 34.

Major journey:

Freshman year I dedicated myself to taking interesting classes without worrying about my major. It was obvious early on that I was drawn to the social sciences, and after Hist. 43 when I discovered an interest in the Middle Ages, the modified History major was an obvious choice. It allowed me to take classes in other departments that interested me, but also assured me that I would create a solid foundation in the period.

Major-specific activities:

(Hopefully) Presidential Scholar with Prof. Warren (We hear back in 5 days, so once I know I can either include this or not…) Undergraduate research grant for dialect study in Treviso, Italy.

Thesis status:

I intend to write a thesis, but I’m still in the early stages of planning it.  I’m hoping to concentrate on 15th century manuscripts in England/Northern France but I still need to narrow down my topic.

Other activities:

Fusion Dance Ensemble, Dartmouth Symphony Orchestra, Flute Teacher, Italian Drill Instructor, Sigma Delta

Off-campus program:

TA of Italian LSA+ in Rome, 08S; History FSP London, 09F

Favorite and least favorite things about your department:

I love how interdisciplinary linguistics is. Few other fields touch on logic, physics, sociology, anthropology, history, and computer science. Also, the linguistics professors at Dartmouth are great teachers and fun people to boot.

My least favorite thing is the infrequency of many interesting classes due to the small size of the department. Core classes aside, many topics are taught only every other year, so you have to be careful when planning out your D-Plan. The upside of having a small department is that you can have a close relationship with all the professors.

Important info for potential majors:

The ling major is a pretty straight shot. Once you’ve taken Ling 1, you can take almost any class in the department. As said previously though; if there are any specific classes you want to take, start planning your D-plan around them early.

Talk to me if:

You have general questions about what linguistics is, or if you’re having trouble with Ling 1 or Syntax. Or if you need a forth.

Most valuable academic info learned:

Go to office hours, even if you’re doing well in a class. Introduce yourself to the professor on the first day. Ask questions.

NPs are a lie. (But don’t tell anyone I said that).

If you’re taking Indo-European Linguistics, from day one keep a running list of ALL sound changes and ALL cognates in the back of your notebook!

Favorite class and professor:

Favorite class: Ling 36, Field Methods, w. David Peterson

Favorite professor: Timothy Pulju

Major classes taken:

LING 1, 17, 18, 22, 24, 26, 35, 80

Major journey:

I took Ling 1 with my freshman fall, purely out of interest, and was hooked. I liked the diversity of topics in linguistics, and dealing with linguistics data was a lot of fun, so I took it and ran with it.

Major-specific activities:

TA for Ling 1; RA for Professor Peterson; Tutor/Section Leader with the ASC.

Thesis status:

Not sure yet.

Other activities:

Co-ed Council—VP; Phi Tau—Social Chair, House Manager;

Off-campus program:

Japanese LSA+ in Tokyo, 07X, and Linguistics FSP in Auckland, NZ, 10W