Environmental Studies

Carrie Rosenblum ‘10
F09-S10 D-plan:  R-R-R
Environmental Studies major, Geography minor

Favorite and least favorite things about your department:

My favorite thing is the small size of the department, allowing majors to get to know each other and the professors very well. Most of the classes are not overwhelmingly large, and I think the overall atmosphere of the department is comfortable, friendly and accessible. My least favorite aspect of the program is the somewhat limited scope and breadth of the course offerings.

Important info for potential majors:

Get to know your professors! Take advantage of office hours and engage your profs outside of the classroom— they want to talk to you! The intimate size of the department invites students to really get to know professors, and for me, these connections have helped me to gain a lot more out of the program than I ever could have on my own.

Talk to me if:

you are curious about environmental education/interpretation, the National Park Service, or if you are interested in sustainable agriculture.

Most valuable academic info learned:

Education does not just occur in the classroom. ENVS classes provide you with a solid framework that you can use apply and expand your knowledge in outside situations. Some of the most important things I have learned have come from off campus and self-initiated experiences. Also, follow your interests as closely as you can, rather than taking classes just to fulfill requirements.

Favorite class and professor:

ENVS 25 with Ross Virginia!  This class reinforced my interest in sustainable food issues.  The assignments were based around firsthand experience, as we got to go on field trips to local farms and farmers markets.  This class really changed my perspective on food and made me think critically about my own eating habits, leaving me with valuable, take home lessons.

Major classes taken:

ENVS 3, 25, 39, 40, 42, 65, 84; GEOG 40

Major journey:

When I entered Dartmouth, I was planning on majoring in romance languages. However, after taking my freshman seminar in the Environmental Studies department, I decided to give up French literature for good. Although I have found other ways to pursue my love of languages at Dartmouth, I decided to devote my academic focus to Environmental Studies, and I couldn’t be more thrilled with that decision.

Major-specific activities:

Presidential Scholar research with Professor Chris Sneddon

Thesis status:

I won’t be doing a thesis.

Other activities:

Admissions Tour Guide; DOC Trip Leader; resident of Sustainable Living Center

Off-campus program:

Italian LSA+ in Rome, 07F; ENVS FSP in Southern Africa, 08F

Internship experience:

In 07X, I was an interpretation intern with the National Park Service at Assateague Island National Seashore in Virginia. I spent ten weeks learning about the park and creating and presenting my own interpretive programs to the public, including an aquarium talk, beach walk, marsh walk, beach campfire, night hike and creature feature. I also assisted with Marine Explorers and surf fishing programs, staffed the Visitor Center desk and interacted informally with visitors. In 09X I will be working in Washington, D.C. as an intern with the consumer advocacy group Food and Water Watch, doing research and advocacy work on sustainable aquaculture.

sliderErica Boyce ‘10 envs3-carier
F09-S10 D-plan:  R-R-R
ENVS and English/Creative Writing double-major
Pre-Law (but not taking any classes for it)

Favorite and least favorite thing about department:

My favorite thing about the Environmental Studies department is that it’s so small that it’s impossible to disappear within the department; you’ll pretty much always be in touch with the administrators and professors, which is really helpful when it comes to finding out about things like guest lectures and special lunches. It’s also a very flexible major—beyond the core courses, you can pretty much do whatever you want with it and pick your own concentration. My least favorite thing about the department is that because it is so small, there isn’t a huge amount of classes offered within it, so you really have to go out on your own and look for classes that will fit into your concentration.

Important info for potential majors:

Definitely get to know Professor Friedland. As chair of the department, he can help you pick classes, let you know about stipends for internships, and just give you general advice about making your way through the major. Also, if there’s a book you need for a class that’s missing from Baker-Berry, check the Hornig Library!

Talk to me if:

you’re interested in the Twelve College Exchange or in combining a double major with more than one term off-campus, or if you’re having trouble finding an environmental studies-related internship

Most valuable academic information learned:

Go to office hours! Your professors are a great resource, and for the most part, they’re more than willing to help you out. Also, it is possible to spend a year off-campus or triple-major or whatever—it just requires a good deal of planning and initiative. Really, though, your time here at Dartmouth can be whatever you make of it, so take advantage of that!

Favorite class and professor:

ENVS 56 was a fascinating (and extremely relevant) class. Prof. Fisher-Vanden is great at explaining things—and she’s really helpful in office hours. Prof. Friedland is also an awesome professor; his enthusiasm is contagious, and he’s very careful about being nonpartisan in his lectures, which is a difficult thing to do in this field. ENVS 72, meanwhile, was a very fun way of getting a unique perspective on environmental issues and nature in general.

Major classes taken:

ENVS 2, 12, 56, 72; BIOL 16; ECON 1; GEOG 14; Biology of Marine Organisms at Bowdoin College; Marine Policy at Williams-Mystic Maritime Studies Program

Major journey:

I came to Dartmouth knowing I wanted to be a creative writing major and thinking that I wanted to take some classes in environmental studies, which I’d never had any experience with before. After taking ENVS 2, I thought I wanted to minor in ENVS—and after talking to Prof. Friedland, I was convinced to become a major. Now I’m thinking about possibly writing a thesis…

Major specific activities:

ENVS 2 test-grader

Thesis status:

Tentatively, a comparison between the clean-up efforts of Chesapeake Bay and the Boston Harbor, with Coleen Fox.

Other activities:

Programming Board; RWiT – writing assistant; PB’s delegation to the Undergraduate Finance Committee

Off Campus Program:

Bowdoin College exchange term, 08F; Maritime Studies Program of Williams College and Mystic Seaport in Mystic, CT, 09W-S

Internship experience:

Ecological management and education coordination intern, Massachusetts Audubon Society Stony Brook Wildlife Preserve, Norfolk, MA, 08W; Sustainable Fisheries intern, New England Aquarium, Boston, MA, 09X

sliderStephanie Gardner ‘10 ENVS-StephanieGardner
F09-S10 D-plan:  R-R-R
Environmental Studies Major; Earth Sciences Minor; Spanish Minor

Favorite and least favorite things about your department:

I love that the major is interdisciplinary.  You choose 4 elective classes, including ones from other departments, which are somehow related to a central issue.  For example, my elective focus is how people relate to the environment, and the courses I’ve chosen include ENVS 15 (Environmental Issues of the Earth’s Cold Regions) and GEOG 19 (Gender, Space, and the Environment).

Many of the faculty offices are far apart and there isn’t a common area where you can hang out with other majors or have the opportunity to run into professors.  I want to help organize some departmental get-togethers so that majors, graduate students, professors, and potential majors have the opportunity to meet each other, so keep an eye out for those!

Important info for potential majors:

Don’t be afraid to just walk into the ENVS office on the first floor of Steele.  There you will find pamphlets about the major, faculty, course offerings, and events.  Susan Milord, the administrative assistant who works in the office, is very friendly and happy to help.  Also, e-mail a professor with specific questions you have about their courses.  They love hearing from students and are happy to respond.

Talk to me if:

Talk to me if you are thinking about studying abroad.  I studied abroad three times before my senior year!

Most valuable academic info learned:

1) Get to know professors.  You need connections for advice, letters of recommendation, research opportunities, and thesis work.
2) Go to Career Services events.  Career Services is possibly the best resource on campus.  Learn to make a killer resume, get advice from alumni, and search for jobs and internships.
3) Follow your passion.  If you love what you are studying, you will excel at it and be happy!

Favorite class and professor:

Class: Pole to Pole: Environmental Issues of the Earth’s Cold Regions. Professor Ross Virginia was fun and knowledgeable.  I loved that we utilized the Hood Museum and Rauner Special Collections Library to delve into Inuit culture while we were learning about climate change issues.
Professor: Richard Howarth.  He is very approachable outside of class and extremely well-versed in Ecological Economics.  He always has a book to recommend related to your economic or environmental interests.

Major classes taken:

ENVS 2, 15, 55; CHEM 5; ECON 1; School for Field Studies transfer term in Costa Rica

Major journey:

At the end of high school I was interested in being an Environmental Studies Major.  After taking some ENVS courses at Dartmouth, I really fell in love with it.  I think your major has to be something that really interests you.  You are excited to go to class and want to learn as much as you can about it.  When my environmental studies classes were doing that for me, I knew I had found my passion.

Thesis status:

My intention is to do a thesis on solar energy with Professor Richard Howarth as my advisor.  It would be a quantitative investigation of powering the U.S. with just solar energy.  Questions I would answer include “how many solar panels would we need?” and “where would we put them?”

Other activities:

Environmental Conservation Organization; Sustainable Living Center; PE program Snowboard Instructor; Intramural Squash

Off-campus program:

Environmental Studies Program through the School for Field Studies in Costa Rica, 08W and 08S; Earth Sciences FSP in the Western US, 08F; Spanish FSP in Buenos Aires, Argentina, 09S

Internship experience:

I was a WISP intern for the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory just north of campus.  I worked 10 hours per week W07 and S07.  I photographed Antarctic ice samples in a cold lab and then processed the images using a computer program. I gained experience working in a research-oriented facility and presented my findings at a poster symposium.  I may be an organic farm and garden-based nutrition education intern at Katchkie Farm X09, where I will learn about sustainable farming practices and teach young children about farming and cooking nutritious meals with home-grown veggies.

sliderThea Sutton ‘10 envs-thea
F09-S10 D-plan: R-R-R
Environmental Sciences

Favorite and least favorite things about your department:
The professors are great. They are super accessible and friendly, they really want to get to know you and what you are passionate about…some have even come to my soccer games. The prerequisite can be tough if you don’t do all the reading and attend class—get to know the professor so that when you need help he/she knows you’re up to speed.

Important info for potential majors:

Get to know your professors. Ask other majors about classes and professor to be sure to take. Be as specific or as broad as you want(/can) with your focus. It’s your education, study what you love!

Talk to me if:

Talk to me if you’re interested in intermixing different disciplines—the ENVS major is great for allowing you to take anthropology, geography, sociology, etc classes along with environmental studies classes and have them count towards your major…or if you’re interest in internships in the Bay Area, I did a lot of research on different opportunities before I settled on Global Footprint Network for my junior winter.

Most valuable academic info learned:

Classes at Dartmouth are all about balance. Taking three reading, or three writing, or three logic, etc classes in one term can be really stressful. Make it balanced…Also, people are here to help. Ask a professor, ask a tutor, ask a classmate, teammate, PAL, etc—they want you to succeed.

Favorite class and professor:

Professor Roebuck’s ENVS 28: Global Environmental Health was the first ENVS class I took and I instantly fell in love with environmental sciences. Professor Roebuck was funny and knowledgeable. This class convinced me to switch from biology/pre-med to the ENVS major. And SOCY 68: Global Health Systems with Professor Anthony was a very cool class I took as part of my focus on health. Most of the class was group projects about different health care system set-ups around the world—I learned a lot.

Major classes taken:

ENVS 2, 3, 20, 28, 55, 60, 91; BIOL 16; ANTH 55; SOCY 68; GEOG 13

Major journey:

I stumbled upon Global Environmental Health my freshmen year. Before that I was a struggling Biology major looking for a balance, I found with ENVS I would be able to take the classes I wanted to and pursue a very specific focus. I took a course with Professor Howarth, who is now my advisor, and that sealed the deal.

Major-specific activities:

Dartmouth Coalition for Global Health; MEDLIFE (Medicine, Education, and Development for Low Income Families Everywhere); Iran Yun Memorial Scholar

Thesis status:

I haven’t decided officially yet whether I am going to a thesis. If I did it would probably be on the institution of agriculture and the subsequent predication of malnutrition and food insecurity leading to higher disease prevalence in those regions though a discussion of history and different case stories.

Other activities:

Varsity Women’s Soccer, Kappa Delta Epsilon, Dartmouth Tour Guide, Dartmouth Coalition for Global Health, Student Assembly

Off-campus program:

Transfer Term at University of Sydney, Sydney, AUS followed by 4 weeks of backpacking in New Zealand—so beautiful.

Internship experience:

Global Footprint Network, Communications Intern, 09W, Oakland, CA

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Kathy Oprea ‘10 GOVT-KathyOprea
F09-S10 D-plan: R-R-R
Double Major Env. Studies

Favorite and least favorite things about your department:

The economics department has many different “tracks” which allow students to really specialize in their field of interest.  The professors are willing to help students who are having trouble in the course, and there are enough Econ majors that it’s easy to find someone to study with in any class that you’re in.  However, because the classes are so large it is sometimes difficult to get to know the professors or to have engaging discussions without visiting them during office hours.

Important info for potential majors:

I would encourage all students thinking of being Econ majors to read about the professors in the department and find one that shares your interests, and get to know them as an advisor.  Sometimes it’s helpful to talk to someone in the field in order to figure out what you’re really interested in.

Talk to me if:

You are interested in economic development or environmental economics.  As well, I’d love to talk to you if you are thinking about writing a thesis or doing a Presidential Scholar research project.

Most valuable academic info learned:

Find something that you are really interested in, and a professor who shares that interest.  Outside research is the best way to develop analytical and writing skills and will make you want to do work independently.

Favorite class and professor:

Econ 72, Law & Economics with Prof. Fischel

Major classes taken:

ECON 72, 38, 24, 27, 22, 21, 20, 10, 1

Major journey:

I came to Dartmouth with the intention of majoring in economics to prepare me for law school.  Sophomore spring, I became interested in environmental economics, and worked with an ENVS professor doing research on the abatement costs of mercury emissions for coal-fired power plants in New England.  Junior winter, I worked at the US Department of Justice Environmental Division, and realized that my true passion was solving environmental policy problems with the least economic costs.

Major-specific activities:

Presidential Scholar Research Assistant with Prof. Richard Howarth of the Env. Studies Department

Thesis status:

“Renewable Energy Efficiencies and the Best Government Policy to encourage Investment”

Other activities:

Daniel Webster Legal Society Center Discussion Group Leader; Varsity Sailing Team; Alpha-Xi-Delta Sorority; Big Brother Big Sister; String Trio Chamber Groups

Off-campus program:

French FSP in Paris, 08W
Internship experience: Team NEO Economic Development Organization, Cleveland, OH (07X); US Department of Justice Environment and Natural Resources Division, Washington, DC (09W); The Cleveland Carbon Fund at the Cleveland Foundation (09X)

Internship experience:

Great Lakes Energy Institute at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, OH