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>  News Releases >   2003 >   January

Against the Tide: Envisioning Peace and Justice in Times of Hatred

Posted 01/06/03

Dartmouth's Annual Celebration of Martin Luther King Jr.

All events are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted. For additional information call 646-3749 or visit www.dartmouth.edu/~eoaa.

For more info

2003 Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration spans 2 weeks
Social Justice Awards 2003

Sunday, Jan. 12
The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center presents Class of 1930 Fellow Mary Robinson, Head of State of the Republic of Ireland and U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights, speaking on "Human Rights and Ethical Globalization."
7 p.m.
Cook Auditorium, Tuck School of Business
646-3874

Friday, Jan. 17
Hopkins Center Film Special: War Photographer. Documentary chronicling the work of photojournalist James Nachtwey '70 in the Balkans, Palestine and Indonesia.
7 p.m.
Spaulding Auditorium
$7, $5 Dartmouth ID (tickets on sale in advance at the Hop Box Office)
646-2244

Saturday, Jan. 18
HopStop: "We Are One: Celebrating Diversity." Through drumming and movement, Ochazania Klarich and members of D'Moja Drum & Dance explore the impact of African, South American and Haitian rhythms on American music. For families with children of all ages.
11 a.m.–12 p.m.
Alumni Hall, Hopkins Center

Lecture by photographer Carrie Mae Weems, in conjunction with Carrie Mae Weems: The Hampton Project, on view at the Hood Museum of Art (see below).
4 p.m.
Arthur M. Loew Auditorium
Reception follows, hosted by the Friends of Hopkins Center and Hood Museum of Art

Hopkins Center Film: Strange Fruit. With Martin Luther King Jr. Touches the Walls of our Lives, short by Jethro Rothe-Kushel '03. Strange Fruit explores the origins and legacy of Billie Holiday's influential protest song. Discussion with Steve Swayne, Assistant Professor of Music, follows.
7 p.m.
Arthur M. Loew Auditorium
$6, $5 Dartmouth ID, free with Loew series pass

Sunday, Jan. 19
Multi-faith Celebration, in honor of the life and works of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. Speaker: Susannah Heschel, Eli M. Black Professor of Jewish Studies and Chair, Jewish Studies Program.
3 p.m.
Rollins Chapel

Monday, Jan. 20
Martin Luther King Jr.'s Dartmouth Speech, "Towards Freedom." Continuous multimedia presentation of the speech he delivered at Dartmouth in 1962.
9 a.m.–3 p.m.
105 Dartmouth Hall

Eyes on the Prize, documentary series about the American civil rights movement from 1952 to 1965.
9 a.m.–3 p.m.
Continuous showing in various Collis Center locations

Martin Luther King Jr. Speech: "Declaration of Independence from the War in Vietnam." Dramatic reading by Dartmouth students, faculty and staff, with introduction by Ronald Edsforth, Visiting Professor of History, and William Cook, Professor of English and Israel Evans Professor of Oratory and Belles Lettres.
12 p.m.
Collis Common Ground
Light lunch provided

Martin Luther King Jr. drop-in play group, organized by the Afro-American Society's Dartmouth Alliance for Children of Color.
3–5 p.m.
Cutter/Shabazz Hall
For children of all ages

Candlelight vigil, sponsored by Alpha Phi Alpha.
5 p.m.
Meet at Cutter/Shabazz Hall and march to the Top of the Hop

Keynote address by Morris Dees, co-founder and Chief Trial Counsel for the Southern Poverty Law Center and renowned civil rights attorney. The center is known for its tolerance education program, legal victories against white supremacist groups and tracking of hate groups. Dees is author of Hate on Trial: The Case against America's Most Dangerous Neo-Nazi, A Season for Justice, and Gathering Storm: America's Militia Threat.
7 p.m.
Spaulding Auditorium
Reception follows at the Top of the Hop
Free tickets available at the Hop Box Office starting Jan. 14, 10 a.m.
Four-ticket limit per person

Tuesday, Jan. 21
"Whose Life to Live? When Dreams and Societal Pressures Conflict," Career Services panel on students' struggles to find their own voices and passions among conflicting pressures.
5–6 p.m.
1 Rockefeller Center

Wednesday, Jan. 22
Amnesty International presents "International Health and Human Rights: Torture, an Affront to Human Dignity," panel with Allen Keller, Director of the Bellevue/NYU Program for Survivors of Torture; Kathleen Allden, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Dartmouth Medical School and Medical Director of the International Survivors Center; and Sowore Oyomele, Nigerian activist and torture survivor.
4:30 p.m.
Brace Commons

Amnesty International dinner and forums:
(1) "Post 9/11 — Torture Interrogation: Justified?" and "Asylum Seekers in the USA," with Allen Keller and Kathleen Allden.
6 p.m.
Brace Commons
RSVP required: amnesty@dartmouth.edu

(2) "Democracy — Is it Worth the Risk?" with Sowore Oyomele.
6 p.m.
McCulloch Hall Lounge
RSVP required: amnesty@dartmouth.edu

Lecture by Jon Jang and James Newton: "Paul Robeson: His Legacy as a Multicultural Artist," in conjunction with "When Sorrow Turns to Joy" (see below).
6 p.m.
Faculty Lounge, Hopkins Center

Hopkins Center Film: Frida. A chronicle of the life of Mexican artist Frida Kahlo, starring Salma Hayek.
6:45 p.m. and 9:10 p.m.
Spaulding Auditorium
$6, $5 Dartmouth ID, free with DFS pass

Thursday, Jan. 23
Community Hour: "Risk." Panel and small group discussion about taking social risks at Dartmouth. Presented by Palaeopitus Senior Society.
12 p.m.
Collis Common Ground
Light lunch provided

Discussion with Paul Robeson Jr.: "Civil Rights, Free Speech and the Price of Dissent," a reflection on his father's life and its impact on civil rights in America.
4:30 p.m.
105 Dartmouth Hall

Spotlight discussion with Jon Jang and James Newton, in conjunction with "When Sorrow Turns to Joy" (see next listing).
7 p.m.
Faculty Lounge, Hopkins Center

East Coast Premiere: Jon Jang and James Newton, "When Sorrow Turns to Joy: Tribute to Paul Robeson—From Africa to China to African American," with special guest Timothy Robert Blevins, bass-baritone. Pianist Jon Jang and jazz flutist James Newton pay tribute to Paul Robeson, the African-American singer, actor and political activist. This confluence of jazz, gospel and traditional Chinese music illuminates the connection between Chinese sorrow songs and African-American spirituals.
8 p.m.
Spaulding Auditorium
$22, Dartmouth students $5

Friday, Jan. 24
"Hate Hurts: How Children Learn and Unlearn Prejudice." Ellen Bettmann, Director of Training and Resources, Anti-Defamation League, talks about her book, Hate Hurts.
12:15 p.m.
Center for Women and Gender
Lunch provided
RSVP by Jan. 23: cwg@dartmouth.edu or call 646-3456

Social Justice Awards and Community Dinner, honoring Joan and Allen Bildner '47, Tuck '48, Parents '75; James Nachtwey '70; Kathleen Allden, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry; Kimberley Porteus '88; and Mattie Richardson '91. With remarks by Susannah Heschel, Eli M. Black Professor of Jewish Studies and Chair, Jewish Studies Program.
6 p.m.
Collis Common Ground
Free tickets available at the Collis information desk starting Jan. 2

Against the Tide: Art and the Politics of Oppression:
(1) Performances: Nuyorican Café poet, Spoken Word by student poets and student theater presentations.
8 p.m.
Top of the Hop

(2) 'area' student art gallery opening. Showcases art that addresses political and historical concerns; DJ and refreshments
10 p.m.
Top of the Hop

Saturday, Jan. 25
Film: Pharaoh's Streets, award-winning documentary about homelessness in Los Angeles, by Jethro Rothe-Kushel '03. Discussion with the filmmaker follows.
5 p.m.
1 Rockefeller Center

Sunday, Jan. 26
Film: The Restless Conscience, Oscar-nominated film about the German resistance to Hitler. With remarks by Tracey Hughes '04 and Gerd Gemünden, Professor of German Studies and of Comparative Literature.
7:30 p.m.
Collis Common Ground

Monday, Jan. 27
Amnesty International presents "Exposing the Chinese Gulag: Laogai Prison Camps," a lecture by Harry Wu, Executive Director of the Laogai Research Foundation and Research Fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution.
4:30 p.m.
Filene Auditorium, Moore Hall

Women of Color Collective presents "The Miseducation of Lauren's Girls: From Queens to Queen @$! %&#!" A documentary/lecture presentation about the representation of women of color in hip-hop culture by David Lamb, Professor of African-American Studies at John Jay College, City University of New York.
7 p.m.
105 Dartmouth Hall

Tuesday, Jan. 28
Dartmouth Community dinner with Randall Kennedy, Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and author of Nigger: The Strange Career of a Troublesome Word; Race, Crime, and the Law; and Interracial Intimacies.
6 p.m.
Roth Center for Jewish Life
Tickets required
E-mail constance.cochran@dartmouth.edu or call 646-3197

Ongoing events
Hood Museum of Art Exhibition
Carrie Mae Weems: The Hampton Project
Jan. 18–March 9

An installation by internationally acclaimed contemporary photographer Carrie Mae Weems and a selection of photographs from Frances Benjamin Johnston's Hampton Album of 1900. These women, distanced by time and race, are joined by their shared focus on the history and legacy of the Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute, now Hampton University, founded in 1868 for the education of African Americans and, later, Native Americans. For information call 646-2808.

Hood Museum of Art Recent Acquisition: John Wilson, Martin Luther King, Jr., 2002

John Wilson's poignant portrait of Martin Luther King Jr. Etching and aquatint with chine colle, purchased through the Olivia H. Parker and John O. Parker '58 Acquisition Fund. On view beginning Jan. 14.

Against the Tide: Art and the Politics of Oppression
Jan. 24–late February

'area' student art exhibition addressing political and historical concerns; see Jan. 24 for opening events.
Top of the Hop

Dartmouth has television (satellite uplink) and radio (ISDN) studios available for domestic and international live and taped interviews. For more information, call 603-646-3661 or see our Radio, Television capability webpage.

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