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Native American Studies: Faculty

Vera PalmerName: Vera Bauer Palmer (e-mail)

Title: Senior Lecturer

Brief Bio: Tribal Enrollment: Tuscarora - Six Nations Iroquois; Grand River Band; Bryn Mawr College B.A. and M.A.; Magna Cum Laude (Philosophy) Cornell University; M.A. (English Language and Literature) Cornell University; Ph.D. Candidate, ABD (English Language and Literature; Concentration: American Indian Literature; Minor: American Indian Studies)

Courses Taught: NAS 8, NAS 22, NAS 34, NAS 47, NAS 80

Vera Palmer came to Dartmouth from Cornell University in 1999 to assume the new mentoring position with the NAS Program. She has also taught "Contemporary Native American Literature," "Contemporary Native American Poetry," "Perspectives in Native American Studies," and "Bear Clan Texts-Senior Seminar." During winter '08, she will teach "Native American Oral Traditions Literature." She was awarded Dartmouth's Eastman Dissertation Fellowship in April, 2000. Her dissertation, "Bringing Kateri Home: Restoring a Cultural Narrative of an Iroquoian Saint," considers the Jesuit hagiography of Mohawk Christian ascetic, Kateri Tekakwitha. Her work proposes an indigenous account of loss and historical grief employing perspectives and principles of the Iroquoian Condolence tradition.

Ms. Palmer is a recipient of the Ford Foundation Pre-doctoral Fellowship ('96), and the Frances B. Allen Fellowship at the D'Arcy McNickle Center - Newberry Library ('97). While pursuing her master's at Bryn Mawr College, she organized and led a Peace Studies Mission to several Anishinabe, Diné, and Hopi communities, to introduce students and faculty participants to tribal leaders in those contexts who work for justice and sovereignty. She collaborated with Bryn Mawr's English and Philosophy Departments to create and co-teach the first Native American Literature course offered at that college. Before leaving Philadelphia in 1995, she was awarded the Philadelphia Mayor's Commission Award, "Women Who Make a Difference," for her activism on behalf of the American Indian community. At Cornell, she created the Native American Indian Prisoners' Support Program within two New York State maximum-security facilities. In recognition of her work on this project, she was awarded in 1999 the Robinson-Appel Humanitarian Award. She conceived and mounted an art exhibit entitled, "Art Across Walls," at Cornell's Willard Straight Gallery, featuring the writing and artistic expression of Native American prisoners. In recognition of this project she was awarded the Cornell Community Partnership Grant.

Ms Palmer began work to establish cultural outreach program at Dartmouth to benefit Native prisoners in New England correctional facilities. Vera also initiated the Native Women's Song Circle at Dartmouth, and a Quilt Project at the NAD House. She serves as the Faculty Advisor for the Alpha Pi Omega Native American women's sorority.

Last Updated: 3/23/09