Lesson 2 Art Lecture

Art Lecture 2 Color Theory

Bring finished triangles to critique

color wheels: mixing, secondary colors from primaries

1. Squeeze out yellow, red, ultramarine, turquoise and magenta onto your platte.

Mix two color wheels with secondary colors from each of the following sets of primaries:

yellow, red, ultramarine
yellow, magenta, turquoise.

2. Using a ruler, copy the large triangle onto a sheet of drawing paper. Choose a formula from any of the small triangles on the bottom of your handout. Mix colors according to the chosen formula and paint your triangle. When completed, paint two more triangles with new formulas.

Triangles: mixing a range of colors from three hues

Unless we are working with light itself as a medium, our medium is not color, it has color. Pigments/paint have color or absorb wavelengths of color.

In this class we'll be working with pigments and subtractive color mixng. In subtractive color when all the colors are mixed, we obtain a neutral or black. Black is the absence of color. It absorbs all light equally.

Subtractive color theory: a way of organizing color and mixing pigments: Hue, Value, Intensity

Hue

In order to visualize relationships clearly, we arrange the hues in a circular a design. We can mix around or across the color wheel.

From Benjamin Martinez and Jacqueline Block: "Visual Forces   An Introduction to Design"
PRENTICE HALL, 1988
p. 186, Figure A

Primaries

Primaries are the three principle hues. They have specific positions on the color wheel. Red, yellow and blue are the primary triad. They are spaced equally apart on the color wheel with yellow at the top, and red on the left and blue on the right in this example. The primaries are said to produce all of the colors. But in reality, along with the primaries red, blue and yellow, we also need turguoise and magenta to mix a wide range of colors. Theoretically, the primaries, themselves, cannot be mixed from any other colors.

The three primaries neutralize each other when mixed together.
Mixing any two primaries produces a neighboring secondary color

Secondary colors

On the color wheel secondary colors are placed between the two primaries from which they are mixed. Orange between red and yellow, green between yellow and blue, and purple between red and blue.
Intermediate or tertiary colors come between each primary and secondary: orange red, blue green, etc.

Analogous colors

Analogous colors are adjacent to each other on the color wheel. A group of analogous colors contain at most two primaries. Analogous colors have a very harmonious influence on a work of art.

Complementary colors

Complementary colors are opposite each other on the color wheel. Blue/Orange, Yellow/Purple, Red/Green. When mixed together they produce neutrals. Placed beside each other in a composition, they create contrast, and often, vibration.

From Benjamin Martinez and Jacqueline Block:
"Visual Forces   An Introduction to Design"
PRENTICE HALL, 1988
p. 195, Figure C

Value

From Benjamin Martinez and Jacqueline Block: "Visual Forces   An Introduction to Design"
PRENTICE HALL, 1988
p. 188, Figure A, B

There are a wide range of color tones that can be achieved by modifying one hue with the addition of neutrals, black and/or white. The property of value distinguishes between the lightness and darkness of a hue. We can mix a hue with black, white, gray (neutral), or with a darker or lighter hue.

All colors reflect a different quantity of light as well as a different wavelength.
Each hue has a normal value that indicates the amount of light it reflects
It can be made lighter or darker than normal by the addition of white and /or black.
It is important to recognize the normal value of a hue.

Intensity

From Benjamin Martinez and Jacqueline Block: "Visual Forces   An Introduction to Design"
PRENTICE HALL, 1988
p. 190, Figure A B C

Value is the quantity of light of a color, while intensity is the quality of light of a color. We also refer to intensity as the degree of saturation in a color.

Spectrum hues have the highest intensity.

There are four ways to change the intensity of a color:

1. Add white. This will make the value higher (lighter) and change the intensity.
2. Add black. This will make the value lower (darker) and change the intensity.
3. Add gray. If the gray is the same value as the original hue, the intensity will change, but not the value.
4. Add complementary hue.

The mixture of two hues exactly opposite each other on the color weel such as red green, blue orange, or yellow and violet result in neutral gray or brown. Complementaries present an equal balance of three primaries, a different result than adding neutrals.

From Benjamin Martinez and Jacqueline Block:
"Visual Forces   An Introduction to Design"
PRENTICE HALL, 1988

p. 191, Figure D
Geraldine Millham, Chairback Tapestry (detail). 1984.

p. 191, Figure E
Michael Vanderbyl, "Six by Six." (Vanderbyl Design, San Francisco)

In these examples we can see how one color beside another changes the character of other colors. In the first image closely related, low intensity colors are used to create a soothing atmosphere. In the second image, high intensity shapes create a contrast against a soft background with low saturation of color.

Color relationships

Closely related colors
Complement colors or extreme value contrast
Split complement = a color and two color on either side of its complement blue/orange red/orange yellow
Transparency affects the intensity of a color

Warm/Cool

Warm colors are said to be on the red/yellow side of the color wheel. Cool colors are on the blue/green side of the color wheel.

From Benjamin Martinez and Jacqueline Block:
"Visual Forces   An Introduction to Design"
PRENTICE HALL, 1988
p. 192, FIGURE A

From Benjamin Martinez and Jacqueline Block:
"Visual Forces An Introduction to Design"
PRENTICE HALL, 1988
p. 219, Figure B
Paul Cezanne, "Houses in Provence." c.1880.
(National Gallery of Art, Washington; Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon)

From Benjamin Martinez and Jacqueline Block:
"Visual Forces   An Introduction to Design"
PRENTICE HALL, 1988
p. 219, Figure C.

Howard Hodgkin, "Goodbye to the Bay of Naples." 1980-1982.
(Private Collection)

Blues tend to recede into the picture plane, while warmer hues come forward. These effects are dependent upon each individual work of art. In the painting below by Cezanne, the warms come foreward and the cool colors recede. However, in the abstract painting by Howard Hodgkins, the sharp blue shape in the center of the composition moves forward because of the scale and power of that color. (#1 Martinez)


 (Color part)

These color exercises will give you experience in:

The first 3 assignments can be grouped together or arranged on small, separate pieces of paper. You will need to put the first two, Value Change and Normal value of Pure Hues, on one sheet of paper, or make separate, identical, gray scales for each one. Make a simple but attractive presentation.

Materials for next week

bring ink and paper
transfer paper
plexiglas plate
newsprint
pencils/eraser
measuring tools
carving tools
safety kut
printing ink
roller


 Lesson 1 | Math partArt part |
 Lesson 2 | Math part |
 Lesson 3 | Math partArt part |
 Lesson 4 | Math partArt part |