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Fall, 1999
MWF 10
103 Gerry


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Dorothy Wallace
Choate House, 6-3610

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IMPS INFINITE SERIES TUTORIAL at ODU
INFINITE series text at UNH
INFINITE series at ASTATE
DARTMOUTH Math Dept





Course Description:

Discover for yourself the computation that won Schrodinger the Nobel Prize in physics. Starting with differential equations in one variable and series solutions to them, we will progress to an in-depth study of the wave equation. A partial differential equation in several variables, the wave equation describes the propagation of both sound and electromagnetic waves, as well as the objects (vibrating strings, drums, and atoms) which produce them. The course culminates in a three week excursion into the solution of Schrodinger's equation for the spectral lines of the hydrogen atom, and a derivation of the orbital shapes seen in every college chemistry book.

Who should take this course? If you are majoring in math, physics, chemistry, or are a hot-shot engineer, this course should be part of your undergraduate education. The timing is intended to make it simple for students in Physics 23 or Chemistry 81 to enroll, as Math 15.3 is particularly relevant to the material in both of those courses.

Prerequisites:

A course in multivariable calculus, an interest in physics or chemistry, a willingness to work.

Text:

We will use a text consisting of four short works by local authors. A prize will be given to anyone who can name this text to our satisfaction. Copies will be available for purchase at the start of class.

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Copyright 1999, MATC
Last updated 17 September 1999