Monthly Archives: March 2012

Wikipedia’s Next Big Thing: Wikidata, A Machine-Readable, User-Editable Database Funded By Google, Paul Allen And Others

by Sarah Perez “Wikidata, the first new project to emerge from the Wikimedia Foundation since 2006, is now beginning development. The organization, known best for its user-edited encyclopedia of knowledge Wikipedia, recently announced the new project at February’s Semantic Tech & Business Conference in Berlin, describing Wikidata as new effort to provide a database of [...] Continue reading

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Engineering Serendipity

by Sarah Perez “I don’t know if Highlight, Glancee, Banjo, or any one of those other startups you’re now officially sick to death of hearing about are going to make it, but I know that for the first time in a long time, we’re starting to move in the right direction in terms of mobile [...] Continue reading

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Strange Bedfellows

If politics makes strange bedfellows, it gets really weird when you add poetry. There is a file in our collection of Robert Frost’s correspondence labeled “Pound, Ezra,” that contains a record of an astounding literary relationship. It starts with a 19… Continue reading

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Tricorder project

“One of the most beautiful aspects of science is that while there is so much we can see and smell and feel around us, there’s an inconceivably large universe around us full of things we can’t directly observe. The Tricorder project aims to develop handheld devices that can sense a diverse array of phenomena that [...] Continue reading

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Altmetrics – Alternative Metrics for Articles (think: impact 2.0)

Altmetrics are metrics that attempt to capture the impact of scholarly publications as reflected in non-traditional media, – social media like blogs, Twitter, and Mendeley.   Traditional works of published scholarship (articles, journals, and scholarly monographs) have citation metrics such as impact factors that reflect their impact in specific, carefully defined venues – the number of [...] Continue reading

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New Instructional Video Resource: lynda.com

Dartmouth College Computing Services is now providing unlimited access to lynda.com for all Dartmouth College faculty, staff, and students. [Access here:  http://lynda.dartmouth.edu] lynda.com is an online subscription library that teaches the latest software tools and skills through high-quality instructional videos taught by recognized industry experts. To learn more, we suggest that you watch this introductory [...] Continue reading

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New Business Books!

Click on the titles below to see these books in the library catalog:
Branding Television
The Number That Killed Us
The End of Finance
 
 
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Dartmouth Traditions: Math Burial

In the 1800s students were required to study math for the first two years of their college career. According to Leon Burr Richardson’s History of Dartmouth College, beginning sometime in the 1830s the sophomores would celebrate the end of their math … Continue reading

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Book Arts Prize for 2012

The Book Arts Prize is a juried award given every year in recognition of excellence in the creation of a hand printed and bound book, letterpress printing, or hand binding made in the studio of the Book Arts Workshop. Deadline for entries is June 1, 20… Continue reading

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Spring Term at Kresge

Welcome to the first day of Spring term! Although the weather has reverted to its wintry temperatures (hopefully not for long), Kresge is open for business! Monday – Thursday: 8am – 12midnight Friday: 8am – 8pm Saturday: 11am – 8pm Sunday: 11am – 12midnight Have a paper to write but don’t know where to start? [...] Continue reading

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